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1 – 10 of 204
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Caroline Jackson, James Morgan and Chantal Laws

The purpose of this paper is to report on untold stories that not only illustrate the creativity but also complexity of working in outdoor events. There has been global…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on untold stories that not only illustrate the creativity but also complexity of working in outdoor events. There has been global interest in the creative industries and the creative economy more generally. Events have not been identified or categorised as part of this. Experiences have been identified as part of the creative sectors (NESTA, 2006) and events are seen as experiences (Jackson, 2006; Berridge 2007). There has been little research undertaken about the creative nature of event experiences, especially in how they are created.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework was created from literature on creativity more generally to inform the Creativity in Events research project. Interviews with those working in the outdoor events sector were the basis of the qualitative stage of the research project investigating the phenomenon of creativity in events.

Findings

This paper identifies the core facets of creativity in the management of outdoor events. These were fluency, originality, imagination, elaboration, environment and complexity. A vignette is used to illustrate the intricacy of the nature of creativity in the production of outdoor event experiences. The overall findings were that event management was both creative and pragmatic and that both are necessary. There was a need for a creative environment with processes and familiarity that aided inspiration and originality.

Originality/value

The background and findings are relevant to recognising events as part of the wider creative economy. A greater understanding of the nature of creativity in events informs both education and practice.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2020

Elvira Bolat, Julie Robson, Kokho Jason Sit, Shannon Birch-Chapman, Samreen Ashraf, Juliet Memery and Caroline Jackson

This paper aims to understand consumers’ response to the trust repair mechanisms adopted by corporate brands in a service sector context following prominent trust damaging…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand consumers’ response to the trust repair mechanisms adopted by corporate brands in a service sector context following prominent trust damaging organizational transgressions.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a qualitative approach, six focus group discussions are used to investigate three high-profile consumer trust erosion cases within the service sector.

Findings

Consumer trust varies by context. Despite the severity of trust damage, corporate brands can recover trust towards their brands amongst consumers not directly affected by transgressions. Not all trust repair mechanisms are equally applicable to all service contexts, and re-branding could be used as a trust repair mechanism. Corporate brands in the service sector should focus on sense-making, relational approaches and transparency. Orchestration of trust repair mechanisms needs to be integrated within the trust rehabilitation processes.

Research limitations/implications

This study illustrates it is important to reconsider trust repair processes to accommodate context and integrate post-transgression consumer research.

Practical implications

Successful corporate brand rehabilitation of consumer trust requires examination of the trustworthiness dimensions consumers express before and after the transgression to select the most appropriate trust repair mechanisms. Findings suggest organizations also have preventative trust repair management programs.

Originality/value

This research is the first to empirically apply the conceptual framework of Bachmann et al. (2015) to explore consumer responses to the trust repair mechanisms adopted by corporate brands by context.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2018

Caroline Jackson, David Roger Vaughan and Lorraine Brown

This paper aims to explore the reasons why descriptive phenomenology (DP) can provide an improved understanding of hospitality, tourism and event experiences. This is…

3012

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the reasons why descriptive phenomenology (DP) can provide an improved understanding of hospitality, tourism and event experiences. This is achieved through two objectives: first, by revealing the complexities and philosophical depths of DP; second, by providing a practical, stepped method that offers rigour and transparency.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based upon a study that explored the lived experience of the popular music festival-goer. It generally discusses the phenomenological philosophies of Husserl (1965 [1911]) and the descriptive phenomenological method in psychology of Giorgi (2009). It identifies not only some of the challenges and criticisms of DP but also the strengths of using a scientific approach to phenomenological research.

Findings

The philosophical strengths underlying DP afford a deeper understanding of the phenomenon being studied. The lived experience music festival study illustrates that the method of data collection and analysis highlights the intricacy of the philosophical debate and research findings. Although the bracketing, or epoché, method of DP has been criticised, the actual application is far more complex than trying to blank out prior knowledge. The aim is to ensure that it is the participants’ experiences that are used to identify the structure that is the phenomenon rather than the personal interpretation of the researcher.

Originality/value

It is recognised that researching the lifeworld affords a greater depth of understanding of experiences in people’s lives. One of the disappointments has been that one branch of phenomenological research, DP, has been underutilised and at times misunderstood in hospitality, tourism and event research. This paper aims to demonstrate and illustrate why and how DP should be considered in the future research of such experiences.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Caroline Jackson

556

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Allan Jepson, Alan Clarke and Gillian Ragsdell

This study lies within “classical discourse” (Getz, 2010) within festival studies as its context is firmly situated within cultural anthropology and sociology. Unlike…

2151

Abstract

Purpose

This study lies within “classical discourse” (Getz, 2010) within festival studies as its context is firmly situated within cultural anthropology and sociology. Unlike previous studies this research is unique in that it integrates social cognitive theory (SCT) which is usually found in psychology discourses. The purpose of this paper is to propose how the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability (MOA) model would benefit from integrating self and group efficacy theory. It achieves this by building on previous analysis of primary data collected in the field at the Utcazene, Street Music Festival, Veszprem, Hungary, (Jepson et al., 2013) using an adapted MOA model.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses previous studies which have tested the MOA model through primary data collection. Following this analysis best practice is and similarities are identified through discussion; then a case is then made to adapt the model to integrate and test Bandura's (1986) concept of self-efficacy based on the benefits it could provide to future research within community festivals and events.

Findings

This paper has been framed by initial research by Jepson et al. (2013) and Hung et al. (2011) which after analysis revealed that the MOA model was still lacking in its ability to reveal “why” local people were motivated or empowered to engage in the planning of community festivals and events. It has become evident through discussion that measuring self-efficacy has much to contribute in regards to community engagement in the event planning process; moreover there is strong evidence to support its inclusion within the MOA model. It could be used to further inform on the synergy within and between the three disciplines underpinning the model such as the relationship between knowledge, opportunity and ability, as well as reveal new ones between self-efficacy and knowledge, opportunity and ability.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper and therefore is based on theoretical discussion but not on empirical data collected in the field of event studies.

Originality/value

Very few studies have engaged measurement of community participation within festivals and events. This study is original as it is interdisciplinary and investigates the concerns the roles local community take (as stakeholders), meanings (how local community culture is represented within the festival) and impacts (internal and external festival impacts and how these effect the local community) through established planning frameworks and SCT.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Stephen Henderson and James Musgrave

To translate theory into a practical tool, the purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for the development of social marketing strategies to modify…

4883

Abstract

Purpose

To translate theory into a practical tool, the purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for the development of social marketing strategies to modify event attendee behaviour in a sustainable direction.

Design/methodology/approach

Consumer value is synthesised with social marketing and consumer behaviour theory to develop the framework. A major problem for festivals (throwaway tents) and current pro-environmental practices are used to determine the framework's applicability.

Findings

The conceptual framework suggests that achieving desired behaviour(s) within an audience requires consideration of the added value at the downstream level, strategies that recognise offsite/onsite behaviour settings, engagement of upstream advocacy and more attention to the evaluation of success.

Research limitations/implications

A single low-involvement behaviour example is used to validate the conceptual framework suggesting further work is needed to widen tests of its applicability.

Originality/value

This paper synthesises theory into a framework that has significant potential as a tool to develop behavioural change strategies at events.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Miguel Moital, Julie Whitfield, Caroline Jackson and Arjun Bahl

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

2812

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data regarding event sponsorship activity, perceptions of event sponsorship, motives to sponsor, form of investment and structure of sponsorship was obtained from a sample of 61 drinks producers in India through a questionnaire. Mann‐Whitney and logistic regression were employed to compare the alcoholic and the non‐alcoholic sectors.

Findings

The results suggest that the alcohol and non‐alcohol drinks sectors sponsored a similar level of events, but in investment volume terms, sponsorship from the non‐alcoholic sector is far greater than that of the alcoholic sector. While the two sectors are similar in many ways, the emphasis placed on certain motives for sponsoring events was different, with alcoholic drinks businesses placing greater importance on reaching niche audiences and increasing media coverage than non‐alcoholic ones.

Research limitations/implications

A limited number of areas of the sponsorship decision‐making were covered, yet the study provides insights into the decision making of one of the key sponsoring industries: the drinks industry.

Practical implications

Securing sponsorship is becoming more difficult and complex. By understanding how sponsors make decisions, including potential variations between companies within an industry, event organisers will be in a better position to tailor sponsorship proposals, enhancing the likelihood of obtaining the desired sponsorship contracts.

Originality/value

Most sponsor decision‐making research focuses on how sponsorship decisions can be improved so that they work better for the sponsor. This paper, in contrast, emphasises that by understanding how clients make decisions (i.e. sponsors), sellers (i.e. the sponsored) will be in a better position to win over competition and secure the desired sponsorship deals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Tommy D. Andersson and John Armbrecht

– The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model explaining the value of event experiences.

1496

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model explaining the value of event experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Three versions of the explanatory model are tested by regression analysis of data from a survey of 650 visitors to a sports event.

Findings

The three model versions are significant and explain the value of event experiences with satisfactory R2 values (0.29, 0.46 and 0.68) using the concepts “Extent of visit”, “Experience intensity” and “Expenditure”. The measures of event experiences (Use-Value, Direct Use-Value as well as Indirect Use-Value) meet requirements for reliability and validity.

Originality/value

The paper reveals that explanatory models are basic but novel in a sports event context and provide a basis for further research. Furthermore, the definition of Indirect Use-Value has been clarified and adapted for higher relevance to destination managers focusing on event tourism.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Eliza Hixson

This paper aims to explore the social impact that two events, the Adelaide Fringe Festival and the Clipsal 500, have on young residents (16-19 years old) of Adelaide. The…

6306

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the social impact that two events, the Adelaide Fringe Festival and the Clipsal 500, have on young residents (16-19 years old) of Adelaide. The purpose of this paper is to examine how young people participate in these events and how this affects their sense of involvement in the event and contributes to their identity development.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was adopted in which focus groups and questionnaires were conducted with secondary school students. As an exploratory study, focus groups (n=24) were conducted in the first stage of the research. The results of the focus groups were used to develop a questionnaire that resulted in 226 useable responses. The final stage of the research explored one event in further depth in order to determine the influence of different participation levels.

Findings

This study found that young people demonstrated more involvement in the Adelaide Fringe Festival and their identities were more influenced by this event. Further investigation of the Adelaide Fringe Festival also indicated that level of participation affects the social outcomes gained, with those participating to a greater degree achieving higher involvement and increased identity awareness. This is demonstrated through a model which aims to illustrate how an event impact an individual based on their role during the event.

Originality/value

This paper applies two leisure concepts in order to analyse the impact of events. Activity involvement is a concept which examines the importance of the activity in the participant's life. Also of importance to young people is how activities contribute to their identities, especially because they are in a transitional period of their lives.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

1 – 10 of 204