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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2024

Caroline Hartmann, Chu Chen and Mario Hayek

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of risk-taking attitude as an important antecedent to corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of risk-taking attitude as an important antecedent to corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use regression models on a sample of 2,136 publicly traded US companies over a 10-year period.

Findings

Corporate risk-taking encourages the pursuit of CSR initiatives and internal (i.e. board strength) and external (i.e. financial analysts) corporate governance mechanisms strengthen that relationship.

Originality/value

While pursuing CSR initiatives involves financial and reputational risks that are evident by the variability in the outcomes (e.g. firm value) of firms that have historically undertaken CSR initiatives, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to theoretically explain why risk-taking is an important antecedent to CSR and empirically test that relationship.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Caroline C. Hartmann and Jimmy Carmenate

Board diversity positively impacts corporate social responsibility (CSR); however, there is limited evidence on how board diversity affects the reputation of organizations that…

1740

Abstract

Purpose

Board diversity positively impacts corporate social responsibility (CSR); however, there is limited evidence on how board diversity affects the reputation of organizations that are involved in CSR. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect board diversity has on socially responsible firms’ corporate social responsibility reputation (CSRR). The authors specifically examine this relationship because an organization’s corporate reputation may be very different to its CSRR gained through engagement in socially responsible activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the CSR reputation scores for the top 100 most socially responsible global companies provided by the RepTrak Database as a measure of CSRR. Board diversity measures are calculated for gender, ethnicity and education to measure their impact on social reputation. The sample for this study consists of 146 observations for the period 2013–2017.

Findings

The authors find a significant and positive relation between having a combination of women and ethnically diverse members on the board and firms’ CSRR. The authors also find a significant positive effect on CSRR when the board is composed of women and educationally diverse members.

Research limitations/implications

Board diversity characteristics continue to impact organizations’ decision-making processes and their involvement in CSR activities as public stakeholders demand greater representation of females and minorities on the board. Because research on board diversity is in its infancy, the authors urge scholars to continue to investigate the impact board diversity has on an organization’s motivation to be socially responsible as well as how it affects their CSRR.

Practical implications

The findings of this study highlight the importance stakeholders place on an organization’s social responsibility reputation and the positive effects of board diversity in managing their CSRR.

Social implications

The findings provide evidence that the composition of the board can influence a company’s engagement in CSR activities and their CSRR as perceived by its stakeholders.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the CSR literature by introducing the concept of CSRR. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study also extends research in the diversity literature by examining the relationship between board diversity variables and an organization’s CSRR. The findings highlight the importance of having a diverse board composed of ethnically and educationally varied individuals and provide evidence of a link between organizations’ involvement in socially responsible activities and their CSRR.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Caroline Heins

Contactless shopping concepts meet the needs of those consumers who want to minimise social interactions, especially due to COVID-19; they also offer added value by combining the…

1276

Abstract

Purpose

Contactless shopping concepts meet the needs of those consumers who want to minimise social interactions, especially due to COVID-19; they also offer added value by combining the advantages of traditional shopping with digital features that stem from online shopping. The development of digitalised retail concepts has been made possible through digitisation and the use of new technologies. To date, the concepts have been created with various formats through the application of the most advanced Industry 4.0 technologies. This paper aims to provide a deepened understanding of the latest trends and draws attention to the various classes, including shopping functionalities and features.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper performs a review of current disruptive and new business retail concepts within the grocery retail industry in Germany. Therefore, a secondary research methodology and observations were performed to create an overview and a categorization. This categorization has been used to identify the related cases.

Findings

The results add to the literature as follows. First, a matching of contactless shopping to innovative business models is made. Second, a status-quo analysis of contactless shopping solutions in Germany is carried out with defined set of criteria. This study created a list of all major available contactless shopping solutions. Third, this study examines two new business models, namely, automated vending machines and walk-in stores, which meet the changes in consumer behaviour and needs in times of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

This paper provides a deeper understanding of the latest trends within the retail industry and draws attention to disruptive business models as well as the functionalities and features of shopping solutions. New store concepts launched during the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in unique selling propositions of 24-h everyday shopping and contactless shopping.

Details

foresight, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2022

Minelle E. Silva, Michele M.O. Pereira and Linda Caroline Hendry

This article investigates how micro-foundations of sustainability can build supply chain resilience (SCRes). Specifically, by defining supply chains as social-ecological systems…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article investigates how micro-foundations of sustainability can build supply chain resilience (SCRes). Specifically, by defining supply chains as social-ecological systems, this article explores how sustainability as a supplier capability leads to the transformative development of SCRes capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal multi-case studies were developed over the first year of the COVID-19 outbreak. A total of 52 interviews were conducted with managers and employees of 12 global supplier firms as well as associated local cooperative and consultancy managers. Secondary data were also used for triangulation. An inductive approach was used for data analysis to elaborate theory through a metaphor.

Findings

Nine micro-foundations of sustainability were identified and categorised using the dynamic capabilities steps: sensing, seizing and reconfiguring. They were found to move together with the preparing, responding and transforming steps of SCRes, respectively, and thus to perform as dance partners using our dance performance metaphor. Moreover, ten supplier cases were found to be adopting a transformative social-ecological perspective as they performed all key stages of our dance performance metaphor. The transformations all resulted from either institutional or social sustainability, and the associated micro-foundations generated six main SCRes capabilities, most commonly linking visibility and organisation with institutional and social sustainability respectively.

Practical implications

A deeper understanding of sustainability micro-foundations is provided for supply chain managers to enhance the development of SCRes strategies in preparation for future sustainability-related crises.

Originality/value

Unlike previous research, this article explores an intertwined understanding of SCRes and sustainability during a crisis. Through the micro-foundations of sustainability we explain how sustainability capability builds transformative SCRes using a supplier perspective.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2024

Jia Wells and Caroline S.L. Tan

This study aims to examine the relationships between functional value (quality and price), social value (extrinsic and intrinsic), emotional value and attitude toward a brand, as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships between functional value (quality and price), social value (extrinsic and intrinsic), emotional value and attitude toward a brand, as well as the direct relationship between attitude toward a brand and the purchase intention of tires. This research also explores the moderating effect of social influence on the relationship between attitude toward a brand and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model based on literature is developed and tested using an online survey, with a sample of 760 active drivers gathered through purposive sample judgment. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling with AMOS 28 and Hayes Process Macro 4.

Findings

The results demonstrate that extrinsic social value has a positive direct relationship with attitude toward brands. The findings also indicate that intrinsic social value has a positive influence on attitudes toward brands. Attitude toward a brand is found to have a positive direct relationship with purchase intention.

Originality/value

This research extends the existing literature on consumption values and offers insights into the specific values that influence attitudes toward tire brands as well as purchase intention. The findings provide insights to tire businesses in values that they could focus on when developing strategies to increase positive brand attitude and purchase intention.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Mohammed Alhashem, Caroline Moraes and Isabelle T. Szmigin

This paper aims to examine how prosumption manifests in an online community, Instructables.com, and its value for those who engage with it. The paper emphasizes its…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how prosumption manifests in an online community, Instructables.com, and its value for those who engage with it. The paper emphasizes its distinctiveness compared to similar phenomena, particularly co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This work uses a netnography-informed research approach, involving Instructables community observations, participation and 15 online interviews with members of the community.

Findings

Prosumption provides personal benefits including hedonic elements of enjoyment and fun, functional elements of monetary saving and self-sufficiency, and cognitive benefits such as problem solving and learning. Further, extra-personal benefits include community-, environment-, market-, family- and friends-oriented benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Personal and extra-personal prosumption benefits generate use and social value, progressing understanding of value through a type of prosumption that the authors term peer-to-peer.

Practical implications

An understanding of the differences among concepts can set expectations, responsibilities and opportunities for both firms and prosumers in an increasingly collaborative marketplace.

Originality/value

By critically analyzing the nature of value through a particular kind of prosumption, the paper makes three theoretical contributions. First, it transforms and broadens the scope of empirical research by clarifying critical distinctions between co-creation and prosumption and establishing them as higher-order concepts. Second, the paper determines the benefits, use and social value participants derive from particular forms of participation in the marketplace. Finally, the paper establishes a new concept, namely peer-to-peer prosumption, which the authors define as a type of prosumption that prioritizes collective, peer-to-peer use and social value over exchange value. The paper contributes to marketing literature on the ongoing evolution of consumer roles and participation in the marketplace, by furthering theorization in this field.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Eluiza Alberto de Morais Watanabe, Caroline Rodrigues do Nascimento, Michele Gasparoto Moreira Teixeira de Freitas and Mayra Monteiro Viana

Sustainable food consumption is crucial to protect the environment and to promote a better quality of life. Our study analyses and compares the causes, perceived consequences of…

1216

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable food consumption is crucial to protect the environment and to promote a better quality of life. Our study analyses and compares the causes, perceived consequences of food waste and practices to mitigate it in supermarkets and restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted 17 semi-structured interviews with managers or other responsible persons with mastery of information about food waste of restaurants (self-service and à la carte) and supermarkets. The data were analysed via thematic content analysis.

Findings

The leading causes of food waste for the interviewed supermarkets and restaurants were improper handling by the staff, ineffective stock control management and lack of employee training. Supermarkets perceived other causes such as inadequate food packaging, refrigeration and temperature issues and dishonesty of carriers. The perceived consequences of food waste were mainly related to the economic aspect. Regarding adopting practices to reduce waste, some highlights are employee training, waste management by a specialized employee, assertive demand forecasting, meal preparation in the store and food donation. Just the supermarkets employ price reduction as a practice to reduce food waste. We concluded that, in general, supermarkets perceive more causes for waste than restaurants but do not necessarily present practices to mitigate these additional causes.

Originality/value

This research expanded the scope of studies about food waste and reveals procedures that those in charge can implement to reduce food waste. Our study analysed the causes, practices and consequences of food waste in two types of food channels (supermarkets and restaurants, in different formats). The literature does not clearly disclose aspects assigned to different food marketing channels, especially in emerging economies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2024

Caroline S.L. Tan and Satoshi Ota

In this study, the authors developed a conceptual model to investigate sustainable consumption behavior, specifically the intention to use reusable bags, and its relationship with…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, the authors developed a conceptual model to investigate sustainable consumption behavior, specifically the intention to use reusable bags, and its relationship with two crucial factors influencing the use of single-use plastic bags: cost savings and convenience. This study also aims to explore the mediating roles of environmental concern, guilt and self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study using online survey involving 421 respondents was conducted, and data analysis performed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that self-efficacy influenced environmental concern and sustainable consumption, while perceived savings did not. Perceived convenience significantly influenced sustainable consumption behavior. Environmental concern had indirect effects on the relationships between perceived savings, perceived convenience and sustainable consumption behavior, whereas guilt did not moderate the relationship between environmental concern and sustainable consumption behavior.

Originality/value

The main contribution lies in the insights for promoting the sustainable use of reusable shopping bags, benefiting both theoretical understanding and practical applications in efforts to encourage sustainable consumption behavior.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2023

Lucia Espinosa-Brisset, Caroline Pénicaud, Isabelle Souchon and Anne Saint-Eve

The purpose of this paper is to better understand consumer's familiarity with fruit processing as well as how fruit production conditions (organic and conventional farming)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand consumer's familiarity with fruit processing as well as how fruit production conditions (organic and conventional farming), processing conditions (homemade, artisanal and industrial) and the type of processing (e.g. applesauce, apple cider and apple sorbet) influence consumer perceptions of processed fruits.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey questionnaire was applied to 1,000 people living in France. The people represented different genders, ages (18–60+) and sociodemographic categories. Participants were categorized based on their produce purchasing habits (conventional, local, organic, local-organic). The questionnaire contained multiple choice and five point Likert scale questions. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests.

Findings

The authors found that participants saw year-round availability, fruit preservation and food waste reduction as processing advantages. Locally sourced products were preferred to organic products. The perceived disadvantages to processing were additive usage, nutrient loss and packaging. For consumers, these disadvantages drove highly differentiated perceptions of industrial versus artisanal/homemade apple products. Processing conditions appeared to matter far more than production conditions (organic vs. conventional). In general, consumers weren't familiar with processing operations, awareness was greater for consumers of local and/or organic produce than conventional consumers.

Social implications

There must be a societal transition toward healthier diets, and food technologies. Informed consumers, might be better equipped to make healthy, informed choices if the consumers are given quality information about food production and processing at different levels.

Originality/value

Research has shown that consumers view fresh organic fruit positively, but only few studies have looked at perceptions of processed fruit products and their familiarity with processing operations. Results of this study demonstrate that consumers could make better choices if the consumers are given quality information about fruit production and processing.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 125 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Valérie Hémar-Nicolas, Gaëlle Pantin-Sohier and Céline Gallen

While recent academic research on entomophagy has predominantly focused on adults, the purpose of this child-centred research is to obtain a better understanding of young consumer…

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Abstract

Purpose

While recent academic research on entomophagy has predominantly focused on adults, the purpose of this child-centred research is to obtain a better understanding of young consumer acceptance of insect-based foods.

Design/methodology/approach

Two qualitative studies were conducted with a total of 43 French children aged 8–13 years. Study 1 (n = 22), based on semi-directive interviews, and Study 2 (n = 21), based on focus groups, included projective techniques and exposure to different types of insect-based products to help children express their feelings and thoughts.

Findings

The evidence shows that in Western children’s minds, insects are considered as culturally non-edible. Children predominantly reject insects as food because of their sensory properties and the disgust they arouse. However, their interest in eating insect-based food is embedded within experiential contexts specific to childhood, in particular the peer group, which makes insect-eating fun and challenging, and the family, which offers a protective and reassuring setting.

Practical implications

The authors advocate changing children’s sensory perception of insect-eating food through sensory and participatory activities. Manufacturers and policymakers should also draw on children’s peer culture to associate insect-eating with positive social experiences and foster peer influence.

Originality/value

Drawing on cognitive psychology theories and the literature in food science on food rejection, the authors contribute to emerging consumer research on alternative food consumption (AFC) focusing on cognitive, emotional and social factors of acceptance or rejection of insect-based foods by children.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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