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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2018

Caroline Doyle

This paper aims to focus on how a public policy designed to address a social problem ultimately became the place brand.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on how a public policy designed to address a social problem ultimately became the place brand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a qualitative case study approach focusing on the city of Medellín, Colombia. It draws from fieldwork conducted in Medellín over 2014 and 2015, including semi-structured interviews with an array of local stakeholders.

Findings

The paper concludes that local governments should be aware that the policymaking process can become part of their branding. It also shows the importance of the continual involvement of stakeholders in the place brand process to ensure it is a sustainable brand.

Originality/value

There are limited studies which focus on how a public policy designed to address a social problem ultimately becomes the place brand. This paper shows how a public policy, social urbanism, became the branding of Medellín.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Caroline Doyle and Anthea McCarthy-Jones

The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of adaptive methods for junior researchers undertaking research in volatile and dangerous environments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of adaptive methods for junior researchers undertaking research in volatile and dangerous environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the presentation of two case studies of the authors’ own experiences in the field, the authors demonstrate the way the use of adaptive methods is crucial for junior researchers to overcome unforeseen obstacles and day-to-day difficulties presented by field studies in volatile locations. Finally, the authors address the gap in the methodological literature on how junior researchers can best communicate adaptive methods in the methodology section of his/her research project.

Findings

The authors argue the importance of embedding a first-person narrative into the methodology sections of the project as a clear way for a junior researcher to demonstrate elements fundamental to the data collection experience, thereby engaging the reader with crucial aspects of the research findings.

Originality/value

The need for junior researchers to draw on a greater degree of flexibility in the field when confronted by the challenges of conducting research in volatile environments is paramount to the success of the project. The authors offer, based on the experiences in the field, pragmatic techniques to addresses some of the “messiness” of field studies that allows the researcher to demonstrate the crucial importance of adaptive methods in the doctoral projects.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Stephen Parker, Frances Dark, Gabrielle Vilic, Karen McCann, Ruth O'Sullivan, Caroline Doyle and Bernice Lendich

A novel integrated staffing model for community-based residential rehabilitation services is described. The purpose of this paper is to achieve synergistic gains through…

Abstract

Purpose

A novel integrated staffing model for community-based residential rehabilitation services is described. The purpose of this paper is to achieve synergistic gains through meaningful integration of peer support and clinical workers within rehabilitation teams. Key features include the majority of roles within the team being held by persons with a lived experience of mental illness, the active collaboration between peer and clinical workers throughout all stages of a consumer’s rehabilitation journey, and an organizational structure that legitimizes and emphasizes the importance of peer work within public mental health service delivery. This staffing model is not anticipated to alter the core rehabilitation function and service models.

Design/methodology/approach

The emergence of the integrated staffing model is described with reference to the policy and planning context, the evidence base for peer support, and the organizational setting. A conceptual and contextualized description of the staffing model in practice as compared to a traditional clinical staffing model is provided.

Findings

There is a potential for synergistic benefits through the direct collaboration between horizontally integrated peer and clinical specialists within a unified team working toward a common goal. This staffing model is novel and untested, and will be subjected to ongoing evaluation.

Originality/value

The integrated staffing model may provide a pathway to achieving valued and valuable roles for peer workers working alongside clinical staff in providing rehabilitation support to people affected by serious mental illness.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2007

Ailsa Cook, Alison Petch, Caroline Glendinning and Jon Glasby

Successful development of health and social care partnerships is contingent on the contribution of all stakeholder groups to overcome the ‘wicked’ issues that beset the…

Abstract

Successful development of health and social care partnerships is contingent on the contribution of all stakeholder groups to overcome the ‘wicked’ issues that beset the field. This article explores four key issues, identified by a network of diverse stakeholders as vital to the future of health and social care partnerships, and proposes ways in which individuals and organisations from all stakeholder groups can support health and social care organisations to work together to deliver good outcomes to service users and their carers.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2017

Caroline Murphy and Thomas Turner

The undervaluing of care work, whether conducted informally or formally, has long been subject to debate. While much discussion, and indeed reform has centred on…

Abstract

Purpose

The undervaluing of care work, whether conducted informally or formally, has long been subject to debate. While much discussion, and indeed reform has centred on childcare, there is a growing need, particularly in countries with ageing populations, to examine how long-term care (LTC) work is valued. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the way in which employment policies (female labour market participation, retirement age, and precarious work) and social policies (care entitlements and benefits/leave for carers) affect both informal carers and formal care workers in a liberal welfare state with a rapidly ageing population.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing the adult worker model the authors use the existing literature on ageing care and employment to examine the approach of a liberal welfare state to care work focusing on both supports for informal carers and job quality in the formal care sector.

Findings

The research suggests that employment policies advocating increased labour participation, delaying retirement and treating informal care as a form of welfare are at odds with LTC strategies which encourage informal care. Furthermore, the latter policy acts to devalue formal care roles in an economic sense and potentially discourages workers from entering the formal care sector.

Originality/value

To date research investigating the interplay between employment and LTC policies has focused on either informal or formal care workers. In combining both aspects, we view informal and formal care workers as complementary, interdependent agents in the care process. This underlines the need to develop social policy regarding care and employment which encompasses the needs of each group concurrently.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Rory Doyle

The SMART Group has been investigating joining methods for ball grid arrays (BGAs). Originally a development of IBM, and expected to be a dominant packaging technology…

Abstract

The SMART Group has been investigating joining methods for ball grid arrays (BGAs). Originally a development of IBM, and expected to be a dominant packaging technology, the BGA is best visualised as a legless PGA. It has the same advantages—high lead count, wide pitch, small area—but does not need holes. The problem of the BGA is that the interconnects are not visible. This places a high demand on process control and material selection — it really is a case of ‘right first time’. The investigation concentrated on this aspect.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Caroline Hellström

The purpose of this paper is to investigate public partners’ motives for seeking and/or accepting partnerships with third sector organisations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate public partners’ motives for seeking and/or accepting partnerships with third sector organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is to seek to identify and explain motives from different perspectives; as responses to government failure or voluntary failure, as related to governance structures, and/or as driven by resource dependencies. The empirical material was gathered through semi-structured interviews with public employees in Swedish municipalities. The aim of the interviews was to grasp the public partners’ motives for partnerships with third sector organisations. Each interview started with questions on the presence and forms of partnerships, thus creating a backdrop for the motives, both during the interview and as a map of the partnership landscape.

Findings

The most prominent motives for public engagement in partnerships with third sector organisations are related to democratic values, the need to solve concrete problems, and economic rationality. The motives vary with the type of partnership of which there is considerable variation in scale, content and contribution; the types of partnership vary with different policy fields and services. Different perspectives highlight different motives but none of them excludes other perspectives.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the paper is the empirically based findings of a multi-layered public–third sector partnership landscape where policy fields, forms and complex motives are intertwined.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Elise Catherine Davis, Ashley Evans, Caroline Uptmore, Sarah Lang, Jessica K. McElroy, David Ellenburg, Tony Nguyen and Bita A. Kash

The purpose of this paper is to present proposed solutions and interventions to some of the major barriers to providing adequate access to healthcare in Kenya. Specific…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present proposed solutions and interventions to some of the major barriers to providing adequate access to healthcare in Kenya. Specific business models are proposed to improve access to quality healthcare in low- and middle-income countries. Finally, strategies are developed for the retail clinic concept (RCC).

Design/methodology/approach

Google Scholar, PubMed and EBSCOhost were among the databases used to collect articles relevant to the purpose in Kenya. Various governmental and news articles were collected from Google searches. Relevant business models from other sectors were considered for potential application to healthcare and the retail clinic concept.

Findings

After a review of current methodologies and approaches to business and franchising models in various settings, the most relevant models are proposed as solutions to improving quality healthcare in Kenya through the RCC. For example, authors reviewed physician recruitment strategies, insurance plans and community engagement. The paper is informed by existing literature and reports as well as key informants.

Research limitations/implications

This paper lacks primary data collection within Kenya and is limited to a brief scoping review of literature. The findings provide effective strategies for various business and franchising models in healthcare.

Originality/value

The assembling of relevant information specific to Kenya and potential business models provides effective means of improving health delivery through business and franchising, focusing on innovative approaches and models that have proven effective in other settings.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Teresa Pereira Heath, Caroline Tynan and Christine Ennew

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextualized view of participants’ accounts of self-gift consumer behaviour (SGCB) throughout the consumption cycle, from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextualized view of participants’ accounts of self-gift consumer behaviour (SGCB) throughout the consumption cycle, from the motivations to the emotions that follow.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an interpretive approach, focused on participants’ constructions of meanings, using 99 critical incident technique interviews, which followed 16 in-depth interviews.

Findings

This paper identifies the following self-gift motivations: To Reward Myself (and Others); To celebrate; To remember or get closer; To forget or part; To feel loved or cheered up; and To enjoy life. It also uncovers a compensatory/therapeutic dimension in most self-gifts. The authors identify changes in emotional responses to SGCB over time, and suggest a relationship between these emotions and the contexts that drive self-gifts. Self-gifts are conceptualized as pleasure-oriented, symbolic and special consumption experiences, which are self-directed, or both self- and others-directed; perceived by the consumer to be justified by the contexts in which they occur; and driven and followed by context-dependent emotions.

Originality/value

This manuscript offers novel insights into participants’ uses of both SGCB and the act of labelling purchases “self-gifts”. It uncovers how consumers are concerned with accounting for indulgent spending and how this problematizes the concept of “self-gift”. It challenges the idea of a single context for SGCB, showing how interacting motivations explain it. It also introduces a temporal dimension to self-gift theory by considering emotional responses at different times. Finally, it offers a new conceptualization of and theoretical framework for SGCB.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Janet E Graetz

The transition from elementary to secondary school involves major changes for students that are reflected socially, academically, and environmentally. Increased emphasis…

Abstract

The transition from elementary to secondary school involves major changes for students that are reflected socially, academically, and environmentally. Increased emphasis on social interactions, school procedures, and academics make high school potentially stressful. For students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), these new academic and social challenges may be particularly anxiety-producing as they reluctantly leave familiar surroundings and friends and transition to high school.

Many of the characteristics of students with ASD may be incompatible with the demands of life in high school. This paper examines the skills that are required for students to be successful in high school and compares them to the skills of many adolescents with ASD. Following a description of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, the paper presents an overview of curriculum analysis and possible curricular changes to assist these students in high school. To enhance the support of the curriculum, subsequent information in this chapter includes the use of visual supports and the implementation of technology. Additional strategies are then presented including information on peer tutoring, and the use of social scripts and social stories. The final section discusses components of high school that may prove challenging, such as block scheduling and the use unstructured time. It concludes with a description of the effective secondary teacher and a look at future directions for this topic.

Details

Research in Secondary Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-107-1

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