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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

George Burt, Caroline Desai and Wes Harry

There is a growing requirement for multi‐cultural, transnationally competent managers in to‐day's global economy. However, the impact of culture, positive and negative, on…

Abstract

There is a growing requirement for multi‐cultural, transnationally competent managers in to‐day's global economy. However, the impact of culture, positive and negative, on management development programmes is often recognised, but not formally addressed. The cultural diversity of students undertaking management development programmes, such as an MBA, presents great opportunities to business school educators to facilitate the development of vital cross cultural management skills. Management development programmes traditionally address interpersonal skills development. However, based on our experience presented here, providing training to develop cross cultural skills specifically will be of growing importance to students, business schools and multinational companies, as they consider the effectiveness of management development programmes. This article sets out several of the key cross cultural issues which we have identified as relevant to management development programmes in an attempt to highlight the important impact of culture on students and teaching practice. These issues include teaching methods, tutor/student and peer group feedback, working in groups and cultural approaches to learning. We believe that such cultural issues can have a dra matic effect on students experience of management development programmes. We suggest a possible framework for initiating and developing cross cultural skills so that cultural richness can be taken from the classroom into the global boardroom.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Cory A. Crane, Robert C. Schlauch and Caroline J. Easton

Over the course of their service, veterans are exposed to elevated levels of chronic stress that contribute to a greater prevalence of mental illness than observed in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the course of their service, veterans are exposed to elevated levels of chronic stress that contribute to a greater prevalence of mental illness than observed in the general population. When mental illness is present, comorbidity is normative. Convergent evidence suggests that co-occurring substance use and mental illness is among the most prevalent forms of comorbidity within veteran samples. The purpose of this paper is to explore issues associated with dual diagnoses among veterans in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Research on dual diagnoses among veterans was reviewed and consolidated for presentation into three substantive content areas consisting of prevalence, associated conditions, and treatment of dual diagnoses.

Findings

Dually diagnosed veterans represent a group at particularly high risk for myriad adverse biopsychosocial and treatment outcomes, including poor health, suicidality, violence or aggressive behavior, arrest, homelessness, and unemployment. A comprehensive strategy has been implemented within the Veterans Health Administration to address dual diagnosis and related problems. Additional research is required to more readily identify co-occurring substance use and mental illness and to refine integrated intervention approaches to minimize burden while improving treatment outcomes for veterans and their families.

Originality/value

The current review includes a wide range of research spanning more than two decades and describing dual diagnosis among combat veterans of all modern eras. Areas in need of further research (e.g. dual diagnosis among female veterans; early detection of psychopathology and fully integrated care among returning veterans) are identified and discussed.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Ramon Padilla-Perez and Caroline Gomes Nogueira

Foreign direct investment (FDI) from developing economies has increased sharply since the beginning of the 2000s. While most investment flows correspond to firms from…

Abstract

Purpose

Foreign direct investment (FDI) from developing economies has increased sharply since the beginning of the 2000s. While most investment flows correspond to firms from large economies, small developing economies have also witnessed the increase of outward investment flows from their domestic companies. The literature on outward FDI (OFDI) from developing economies has focused mainly on large emerging countries, such as China and India. In the case of small developing economies, for which there is scant empirical evidence, firms willing to invest abroad face a different business environment with several barriers such as a small domestic market to achieve economies of scale and a limited supply of specialised resources. In this setting, the purpose of this paper is to examine firm-level strategies and the home-country effects in a small developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

A research case study is conducted through a representative sample of Costa-Rican firms investing abroad. Costa Rica makes a strong case since it stands out among small developing economies investing abroad in terms of both the number of operations and the amount of OFDI.

Findings

The main findings are: outward investment is not only for large and mature firms, as medium and small-sized firms are actively investing abroad; most firms pursue a market-seeking strategy; the benefits for the firm and the home country are stronger when companies follow a clear outward investment strategy; and there is a positive relationship between international trade and OFDI.

Originality/value

This paper provides novel empirical evidence to better understand an emerging trend in OFDI: in an increasingly integrated world economy, even SMEs from small developing economies are compelled to internationalise their operations in order to compete successfully.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2014

Birong Ho and Laura Horne-Popp

The chapter aims to present a case study of what is involved in implementing the VuFind discovery tool and to describe usability, usage, and feedback of VuFind.

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter aims to present a case study of what is involved in implementing the VuFind discovery tool and to describe usability, usage, and feedback of VuFind.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter briefly documents Western Michigan University (WMU) and University of Richmond’s (UR) experience with VuFind. WMU Libraries embarked on a process of implementing a new catalog interface in 2008. UR implemented VuFind in 2012. The usability result and usage of Web 2.0 features are discussed.

Findings

The implementation processes at WMU and UR differ. At WMU, users’ input was not consistent and demanded software customization. UR strategically began with a very focused project management approach, and intended the product as short-term solution. The usability and feedback from several sites are also presented.

Practical implications

The benefits of using open source software include low barrier and cost to entry, highly customizable code, and unlimited instances (libraries may run as many copies of as many components as needed, on as many pieces of hardware as they have, for as many purposes as they wish). With the usability studies presented, VuFind is proved to be a valid solution for libraries.

Originality/value

The chapter provides a unique account of library’s experience providing an alternative catalog interface using open source software. It also uniquely reports on VuFind usability and initial testing results and evaluation.

Details

New Directions in Information Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-559-3

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Caroline Chibelushi and Pat Costello

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the challenges faced by West Midlands (UK) information communications technology (ICT)‐oriented small to medium‐sized enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the challenges faced by West Midlands (UK) information communications technology (ICT)‐oriented small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in adopting and coping with the speed of fast‐changing technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 73 company managers (most of them are owners) were interviewed in various sub‐regions of West Midlands. Among the companies, 81 per cent of SMEs opted for face‐to‐face interview, while 19 per cent opted for a telephone interview.

Findings

Several factors that affect the speed of adopting new technology were identified, ranging from SME owner or manager level of education, lack of strategy and perceived benefits in adopting new technologies, to ICT investment, involvement in research, innovation and research and development.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on the ICT‐oriented businesses in general. ICT is a wide area and so there is a need to test each type of ICT and see how other factors like geographical location affect the business. Also, it would have been interesting to have large number of medium‐sized businesses involved in the survey.

Practical implications

The identified factors need to be addressed if sustainable ICT adoption within the ICT‐oriented SMEs in the region is to be achieved. The research provides a basis for the establishment of future projects that will embed these factors.

Originality/value

This is the first study that uses a large data sample collected through face‐to‐face interviews to present the challenges faced by the ICT‐oriented businesses in West Midlands in adopting new technologies. The study suggests means to achieve a successful and sustainable technology adoption for ICT‐oriented SMEs in the region.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Vanaja Menon Vadakepat

The purpose of this paper is to focus on two main aspects: the extent of shift in consumer demand from traditional to global products and the factors that influence this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on two main aspects: the extent of shift in consumer demand from traditional to global products and the factors that influence this change in consumption behavior. The growing size of the Diaspora and corresponding increase in disposable income form one reason for examining shifts in buying behavior of rural consumers in Kerala. Most of the studies describe a shift in consumption styles, but have not yet explored the extent to which this shift is being influenced by Diaspora culture and, if so, why? Focusing on the extent of the shift in Kerala consumers’ choice from traditional to global products, this paper aims to fill the gaps in past reviews.

Design/methodology/approach

Six villages were randomly selected from three districts ranking top in foreign remittances. Applying a 50-50 combination of Diaspora and non-Diaspora consumers, 300 respondents were included in the survey.

Findings

Two hypotheses were formulated to test salient shifts in consumers’ choice and revealed a significant influence of the Diaspora community in the shift from traditional to global products. An equal number of non-Diaspora consumers preferred traditional products, but the purchase volume of Diaspora consumers and sales of global products by small rural shops reveal the influence of Diaspora affluence. The findings illustrate emerging changes in rural consumers’ choice.

Originality/value

Kerala rural markets and Keralites’ consumption choices are an apt example on which to base research. This paper focuses on two main aspects: the extent of the shift in consumer demand from traditional to global products and the factors that influence this change in consumption behavior. The findings would support global distributors in designing a business platform to penetrate rural markets.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Abstract

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Dianne H.B. Welsh, Eugene Kaciak, Esra Memili and Caroline Minialai

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between women entrepreneurs’ firm performance and two dimensions (enrichment and interference) of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between women entrepreneurs’ firm performance and two dimensions (enrichment and interference) of the business-family interface (BFI) in the moderating context of the level of economic development in two emerging countries – Morocco and Turkey. The enrichment perspective was operationalized as family instrumental (financial) and affective (moral) support, while interference was operationalized as gender-related personal problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The study drew upon the work-family interface (WFI) theory from the family embeddedness perspective in the context of institutional economics. In Morocco, a purposive sample of 116 women entrepreneurs completed a self-administered questionnaire using field collection, mail, and phone surveying methods. In Turkey, 147 women entrepreneurs completed the questionnaire online and through personal contacts in business organizations.

Findings

The findings indicated a positive relationship of family financial support with business performance of female entrepreneurs in Morocco, a less economically advanced country. However, family moral support is related to better firm performance in Turkey, a more advanced economy. Gender-related personal problems of women entrepreneurs appear to hamper their business performance in Turkey; while in Morocco, the performance of women entrepreneurs seems to improve in the face of such impediments.

Practical implications

The results provide initial evidence that female entrepreneurs benefit from the linkages of family-to-business enrichment in different ways, depending on the country’s level of economic development. In less economically developed countries, women entrepreneurs benefit more from instrumental rather than affective components of the enrichment dimension of the BFI. Conversely, in more economically advanced countries, female entrepreneurs benefit more from affective rather than the instrumental elements of this dimension. Likewise, the components of the interference dimension of the BFI affect female entrepreneurs differently depending on the economic development of the countries. Women in the less-developed country of Morocco are less impeded by their personal problems compared to their counterparts in Turkey, a more developed economy. Actually, Moroccan women entrepreneurs improved their business performance when facing obstacles, most likely due to their increased inner strength and resilience acquired when battling adversarial institutional conditions.

Originality/value

The present study makes three unique contributions to the entrepreneurship literature. First, the study links the two BFI dimensions (enrichment and interference) to firm performance with an exclusive focus on female business owners. Second, within the construct of enrichment, the study employs both family instrumental and emotional support. Third, the study shows that the country’s level of economic development moderates the relationships between the BFI dimensions and firm performance.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Consumer Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-491-0

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Innovation and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-828-2

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