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Article

Juliana Thompson, Sue Tiplady, Phil Hodgson and Carole Proud

This study aims to scope the profile and application of an advanced clinical practitioner (ACP) roles in primary care in the North of England and how these roles meet the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to scope the profile and application of an advanced clinical practitioner (ACP) roles in primary care in the North of England and how these roles meet the requirements of Health Education England's (HEE’s) ACP workforce capability framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage design was used. Stage 1 analysed health and social care workforce intelligence reports to inform scoping of numbers of ACPs working in primary care. Stage 2 used two surveys. Survey 1 targeted ACP leads and collected strategic-level data about ACP application. Survey 2 targeted staff who perceived themselves to be working as ACPs. Survey 2 was in three parts. Part 1 collected demographic data. Part 2 required participants to record their perceived competence against each of the HEE ACP framework capability criteria. Part 3 required respondents to identify facilitators and barriers to ACP practice.

Findings

Despite the introduction of HEE's ACP capability framework, there is inconsistency and confusion about the ACP role. The results indicated a need for standardisation of role definition and educational and practice requirements. The results also suggested that some ACPs are not working to their full potential, while some staff who are employed as “gap-fillers” to provide routine clinical services perceive themselves as ACPs despite not working at the ACP level.

Originality/value

Although previous research has explored the application of ACP practice in primary care, few studies have considered ACP application in the light of the introduction of workforce capability frameworks aimed at standardising ACP practice.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article

Juliana Thompson, Anne McNall, Sue Tiplady, Phil Hodgson and Carole Proud

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain primary care advanced clinical practitioners’ (ACP) perceptions and experiences of what factors influence the development and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain primary care advanced clinical practitioners’ (ACP) perceptions and experiences of what factors influence the development and identity of ACP roles, and how development of ACP roles that align with Health Education England’s capability framework for advanced clinical practice can be facilitated in primary care.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was located in the North of England. A qualitative approach was used in which 22 staff working in primary care who perceived themselves to be working as ACPs were interviewed. Data analysis was guided by Braun and Clarke’s (2006) six phase method.

Findings

Five themes emerged from the data – the need for: a standardised role definition and inclusive localised registration; access to/availability of quality accredited educational programmes relevant to primary care and professional development opportunities at the appropriate level; access to/availability of support and supervision for ACPs and trainee ACPs; a supportive organisational infrastructure and culture; and a clear career pathway.

Originality/value

Findings have led to the generation of the Whole System Workforce Framework of INfluencing FACTors (IN FACT), which lays out the issues that need to be addressed if ACP capability is to be maximised in primary care. This paper offers suggestions about how IN FACT can be addressed.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Julie M. Parsons

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the benefits of cooking one-to-one, alongside commensality (eating together) for improving offenders’/ex-offenders’ health and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the benefits of cooking one-to-one, alongside commensality (eating together) for improving offenders’/ex-offenders’ health and well-being, measured in terms of improved social skills, cultural competencies and successful resettlement.

Design/methodology/approach

Fieldwork conducted over nine months included; participant observation of lunch times (n=56) and cooking one-to-one with trainees (n=27), semi-structured interviews (n=23) and a “photo-dialogue” focus group with trainees (n=5) and staff (n=2).

Findings

Commensality is beneficial for offenders’ health and well-being. Further, preparing, cooking, serving and sharing food is a powerful means of improving self-esteem and developing a pro-social identity.

Research limitations/implications

The original focus of the research was commensality; it was during the study that the potential for cooking as an additional tool for health and well-being emerged. A future longitudinal intervention would be beneficial to examine whether the men continued to cook for others once released from prison and/or finished at the resettlement scheme.

Practical implications

Everyday cooking to share with others is an invaluable tool for improving self-worth. It has the potential to build pro-social self-concepts and improve human, social and cultural capital.

Social implications

Cooking lunch for others is a part of strengths-based approach to resettlement that values community involvement.

Originality/value

Cooking and eating with offenders/ex-offenders is highly unusual. Further hands-on cooking/eating activities are beneficial in terms of aiding self-confidence and self-respect, which are vital for improving offenders’/ex-offenders’ health and well-being.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part

Lara Foley

This chapter is concerned with the varied legitimizing discourses used by midwives to frame their identities in relation to their work. This sociological issue is…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the varied legitimizing discourses used by midwives to frame their identities in relation to their work. This sociological issue is particularly important in the context of an occupation, such as this one, that exists at the border of competing service claims. Drawing on 26 in-depth interviews, I use narrative analysis to examine the stories that midwives tell about their work. Through these women’s work narratives, I show the complex intersection of narrative, culture, institution, and biography (Chase, 1995, 2001; DeVault, 1999).

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Reproduction and Sexuality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-088-3

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Book part

Anita Nigam and Carole Janisch

To facilitate teacher–researcher collaboration in order to implement an informational writing research project using the framework of Browse, Collect, Collate, and Compose…

Abstract

Purpose

To facilitate teacher–researcher collaboration in order to implement an informational writing research project using the framework of Browse, Collect, Collate, and Compose embedded within the writing workshop.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted using a qualitative (Merriam, 1998) method of inquiry, more specifically, case study research design. A researcher and a practitioner came together to explore problems related to authentic use of expository genre and collaborated to help fourth graders write informational books.

Findings

The development of an authentic informational book was in contrast to the inauthentic purposes whereby students studied expository writing as preparation for statewide testing of student writing achievement. The study advocates the usage of authentic literacy contexts where students can enjoy writing for personal purposes.

Practical implications

Collaboration between classroom teachers of writing and researchers contributes to the theoretical and practical knowledge base of the teacher and researcher. Overall literacy development is enhanced when students read and write out of their own interest. Students use trade books as mentor texts to compose and create their informational books. The value of seeing fourth graders as researchers and making an informational book serves the authentic purpose of writing.

Details

Writing Instruction to Support Literacy Success
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-525-6

Keywords

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Article

Joan Stein, Alice Bright, Carole George, Terry Hurlbert, Erika Linke and Gloriana St Clair

The paper aims to give a presentation of a rich dataset to illuminate graduate students' rating of their satisfaction with library collections and services.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to give a presentation of a rich dataset to illuminate graduate students' rating of their satisfaction with library collections and services.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a qualitative investigation based on focus groups.

Findings

The paper finds that, although rich detail is provided, the study is part way through and data need more analysis for trends to emerge.

Research limitations/implications

The study is a research project which is ongoing.

Practical implications

Rich data collected are indicating areas for improvement in service, which will be synthesized as the research progresses.

Originality/value

It is rare for data of this richness to be offered to readers. It will help others by confirming or illuminating their own investigations.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article

Carole Congram, Peggy Slye and Priscilla Glidden

This paper describes a customer service initiative in a global telecommunications cooperative, the accepted industry leader in technical quality. Not only are the…

Abstract

This paper describes a customer service initiative in a global telecommunications cooperative, the accepted industry leader in technical quality. Not only are the customers multicultural, but the staff is diverse as well. As opposed to the traditional top‐down approach, the INTELSAT initiative originated with middle management. Two groups were formed, each charged with improving a complex, multifunctional ordering process associated with about 50 per cent of revenues. As the groups progressed, each had its own issues, successes, and problems. Although the groups differed considerably in composition, both achieved success, as measured by customer feedback and internal metrics. A final section covers conclusions and recommendations.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Carole Joseph

This paper aims to describe the benefits of delivering a strategically driven women's network that encourages a pipeline of female talent.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the benefits of delivering a strategically driven women's network that encourages a pipeline of female talent.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study illustrates a strategy for employee engagement with talent development and retention.

Findings

The paper presents practical case study evidence that links a strategic company affinity network and its commitment to developing high potential women.

Originality/value

The paper outlines in practical terms how a diverse talent strategy can be developed that is fundamentally based deep in the business strategy. It demonstrates several practical approaches that companies can take to align the objectives of their women's networks with their HR talent strategy.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article

Raul Espejo

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the knowledge that Beer's viable system model helps when applied to the study of change processes in organisations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the knowledge that Beer's viable system model helps when applied to the study of change processes in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a case study constructed on interviews and shared reflections by the author and a key player in the company. Aspects of the case study are then seen with an epistemological lens.

Findings

While it is apparent that ideas, purposes, values or policies depend on resources to happen, this paper argues that it is necessary their embodying in effective relations to succeed creating and producing desirable meanings.

Research limitations/implications

Some forms of embodiment are more effective than others. The viable system model offers embodiment criteria to increase the chances of a successful production of ideas, purposes, values and policies, and the case study shows that for this purpose a limitation is transforming long‐established relationships.

Originality/value

This paper uses a particular and unique situation to illustrate through the viable system model some of the general difficulties that organisations face in achieving desirable transformations.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article

This paper aims to explain that Elior UK, a contract caterer with the lowest staff turnover in the industry, has been named one of the best big companies to work for in

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain that Elior UK, a contract caterer with the lowest staff turnover in the industry, has been named one of the best big companies to work for in the UK by workplace specialists Best Companies.

Design/methodology/approach

It examines the reasons for the award, concentrating on the eXperience training program that helps to deliver service excellence.

Findings

The paper describes the reasons for the program, the form it takes and the results it has helped Elior to achieve. It highlights the role of the company's service champions in delivering the training.

Practical implications

The paper reveals that customers get delight, pleasure and service with a smile; clients get the reassurance that the whole experience reflects their ethos, high standards and care for the people that matter to them; staff get careers in an organization that recognizes their importance to the business and supports them; and suppliers get to work closely with an organization that celebrates great food and drink and supports their contribution to sustainability and local sourcing.

Social implications

It highlights how service‐industry jobs – often marked by poor working conditions and high employee turnover – can be transformed into attractive careers for the long term.

Originality/value

The paper gives the inside story of a training program that is transforming customer service and bringing significant commercial benefits into the bargain.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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