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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Carol W. DeMoranville, Carol C. Bienstock and Kim Judson

Previous research shows that question order affects responses, but does not indicate which order is more accurate. This study aims to examine the effect of three question…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research shows that question order affects responses, but does not indicate which order is more accurate. This study aims to examine the effect of three question orders on measurements of SERVQUAL and global quality in an effort to determine which order produced the most predictive measures.

Design/methodology/approach

Three forms of a survey were randomly distributed to users of different services; banking, dental services, and hair salons. Correlation with intention of future interaction was used to identify the order that resulted in the most predictive quality measure.

Findings

The paper finds that correlations with intention of future interaction were highest for SERVQUAL in the global‐SERVQUAL order, but highest for the global quality measure in the random order.

Research limitation/implications

This study indicates that practitioners and academicians should order questionnaire items differently depending on how the results will be used and which type of measure, specific or global service quality, is the focus of a questionnaire. Generalizations are limited to SERVQUAL and multiple item measures of service quality.

Practical implications

The findings indicate which of several question orders can be used to generate the most predictive measures of SERVQUAL and global service quality.

Originality/value

Previous research has examined measurement effects of specific‐general question orders, without indicating which order is most predictive. This study includes a random order and also suggests appropriate item order for predictive measures.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Jane McKay‐Nesbitt, Carol W. DeMoranville and Dan McNally

The purpose of this paper is to contend that one way to advance the social marketing discipline is by introducing students to social marketing concepts during the early…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contend that one way to advance the social marketing discipline is by introducing students to social marketing concepts during the early stages of their marketing education. Thus, it describes an interdisciplinary group Social Marketing Plan (SMP) project that was included as a class project in an introductory marketing course. An analysis of the SMP's impact on student learning is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

Foundations of Marketing (Foundations) students at a US university completed an SMP project as a course requirement. Project impact was assessed with post‐project measures of students' ability to apply social marketing concepts in a SMP. Project impact was also assessed with post‐project measures of attitudes toward working on interdisciplinary teams and pre‐ and post‐project comparisons of declarative marketing knowledge, environmental awareness, environmental attitudes, and environmental intentions. A post hoc comparison of the commercial marketing knowledge of a control group and Foundations students was also conducted.

Findings

End of semester surveys showed that Foundations students understood and were able to apply social marketing concepts, enjoyed the SMP project, appreciated the value of working in interdisciplinary teams, and believed that future SMP projects should include students from other disciplines. Foundations students also reported significant increases in environmental awareness, attitudes, and intentions, and commercial marketing knowledge. Contrasts with a control group revealed that adding social marketing concepts to an introductory marketing course did not impede Foundations students' learning of commercial marketing concepts.

Originality/value

The paper provides evidence that incorporating a social marketing project into an introductory marketing course is an effective method for introducing students to social marketing concepts, therefore advancing the social marketing discipline. Changes in student environmental attitudes and intentions to act to preserve the environment also suggest that a SMP project can be an effective method of doing social marketing.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Carol C. Bienstock, Carol W. DeMoranville and Rachel K. Smith

What is the best way for service organizations to evaluate and motivate service employees so that customers are retained and new customers are attracted? What motivates…

Abstract

What is the best way for service organizations to evaluate and motivate service employees so that customers are retained and new customers are attracted? What motivates service employees to deliver high quality service? Are there actions a service organization can take, e.g. way of evaluating, training, and rewarding employees, which encourage them to perform to the organization’s advantage? Answers to these questions would enable a service organization to formulate a system that links human resource management policies to desired service employee performance, thus enhancing customer perceptions of service quality and organizational financial outcomes. This research investigated organizational citizenship behavior, with its framework of organizational rights and responsibilities, to explore these issues. The research shows that service employee perceptions of how they are treated by the service organization, i.e. what organizational rights they receive, are positively associated with organizational citizenship behaviors. Furthermore, it demonstrates that these behaviors result in more effective service delivery to organizational standards and enhanced customer perceptions of service quality.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Andrew McAuley

Abstract

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2001

Timothy W. Aurand, Carol DeMoranville and Geoffrey L. Gordon

Well‐documented corporate demands for crossfunctionally competent employees have instigated a wide variety of efforts by the educational community to integrate business…

Abstract

Well‐documented corporate demands for crossfunctionally competent employees have instigated a wide variety of efforts by the educational community to integrate business curricula. Many colleges and universities struggle to functionally integrate business programs that historically have been delivered by well‐defined, and often well‐siloed, disciplines. Drawing from the numerous published and unpublished case studies of cross‐functional integration attempts, this study develops a framework of critical issues to consider when developing an integrated program. The framework develops five major categories of issues (strategic, leadership, administrative, faculty, and student) to help universities identify typical program decisions and potential roadblocks that may inhibit the development of a successful program.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

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