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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Michelle Brown, Christina Cregan, Carol T. Kulik and Isabel Metz

Voluntary collective turnover can be costly for workplaces. The authors investigate the effectiveness of high-performance work system (HPWS) intensity as a tool to manage…

Abstract

Purpose

Voluntary collective turnover can be costly for workplaces. The authors investigate the effectiveness of high-performance work system (HPWS) intensity as a tool to manage voluntary collective turnover. Further, the authors investigate a cynical workplace climate (CWC) as a boundary condition on the HPWS intensity–voluntary collective turnover relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The unit of analysis is the workplace, with human resource (HR) managers providing data on HPWS practices in Time 1 (T1) and voluntary collective turnover two years later. Aggregated employee data were used to assess the cynical workplace climate. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study’s results demonstrate a negative relationship between HPWS intensity and voluntary collective turnover when there is a low cynical workplace climate. The authors find that in a high cynical workplace climate, HPWS intensity is ineffective at managing voluntary collective turnover.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s results show that HPWS intensity needs to be well received by the workforce to be effective in reducing voluntary collective turnover.

Practical implications

To increase the chances of HPWS intensity reducing voluntary collective turnover, workplaces need to assess the level of employee cynicism in their workplace climates. When the climate is assessed as low in cynicism, the workplace can then consider implementing an HPWS.

Originality/value

The authors explain why the HPWS intensity–voluntary collective turnover relationship varies across workplaces. As HR practices are subject to interpretation, workplaces need to look beyond the practices in their HPWS and focus on employee receptivity to HR practices.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Isabel Metz, Carol T. Kulik, Christina Cregan and Michelle Brown

Managers develop psychological contracts (PCs) with staff as part of their people management responsibilities. A second-stage mediated moderation model explains how a…

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2046

Abstract

Purpose

Managers develop psychological contracts (PCs) with staff as part of their people management responsibilities. A second-stage mediated moderation model explains how a manager’s personality influences the content and fulfillment of PCs in different organizational contexts. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 749 managers at Australian organizations were collected and regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses. The Edwards and Lambert (2007) approach was used to analyze conditional indirect effects.

Findings

Managers high on agreeableness, conscientiousness and extraversion are more likely to establish relational PCs with their staff than managers low on these personality traits. The effects of agreeableness and conscientiousness on the fulfillment of the PC occur through the “relational PC” variable. Once a relational PC is established, a manager’s ability to fulfill the PC is constrained by the extent to which polices and practices are formalized.

Research limitations/implications

Organizations may need to delegate more power and discretion to managers to enable them to fulfill employer obligations toward their staff, and/or clearly communicate to managers their boundaries in employment promises. In turn, managers need to be aware of personality’s influence on the creation and fulfillment of promises. Causality cannot be inferred because of the study’s cross-sectional data.

Originality/value

Research has focused on employees’ personality and perceptions of the PC. This study is the first to focus on managers’ personality and PC creation and fulfillment.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Sanjeewa Perera and Carol T. Kulik

Emotion work benefits service organizations, but high emotion-workloads lead to negative consequences for employees. We examined differences between employees highly…

Abstract

Emotion work benefits service organizations, but high emotion-workloads lead to negative consequences for employees. We examined differences between employees highly competent in emotion work (Experts) and those who are less competent (Novices). We found that Novices conformed to organizational level display rules, used simple strategies and felt overwhelmed by their emotion-workload. In contrast, Experts followed interaction level display rules, used proactive strategies, and found emotion work to be effortless. This suggests that emotion work competence can act as a firewall buffering employees from negative consequences. Hospitality organizations can benefit from encouraging employees to increase their emotion work competence.

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Michelle Brown, Carol T. Kulik and Victoria Lim

Delivering negative feedback to employees is highly problematic for managers. Negative feedback is important in generating improvements in employee performance, but likely…

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4742

Abstract

Purpose

Delivering negative feedback to employees is highly problematic for managers. Negative feedback is important in generating improvements in employee performance, but likely to generate adverse employee reactions. However, if managers do not address poor performance, good performers may become demoralized or exit the organization. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how managers communicate negative feedback and the factors that drive their choice of tactic.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use interview data from practicing line managers with experience in delivering negative feedback to learn whether their tactic choices are consistent with Implicit (“best practice”) or Contingency (“best fit”) theory.

Findings

The authors identify five negative feedback tactics: evidence, emotive and communication tactics are foundation tactics while evidence + communication and evidence + emotive tactics are bundles of the foundation tactics. Managers apply a “best fit” approach from a set of “best practice” negative feedback options. The choice of negative feedback tactic is driven by the manager’s assessment of the “best fit” with the employee’s personality.

Research limitations/implications

Most of the managers believed that their negative feedback tactic had been effective. Future researchers should investigate which negative feedback tactics employees regard as most effective.

Practical implications

A best fit approach to the delivery of negative feedback requires organizations to give managers discretion in the delivery of negative feedback. Managers may mis-assess fit which can undermine the effectiveness of the appraisal process.

Originality/value

The authors focus on how negative feedback is communicated by managers. Existing research focusses on reactions to negative feedback without taking into account how it is delivered.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Kristen Bell De Tienne and G. Stoney Alder

Employee evaluation and monitoring have been common in America since colonial times. With industrialization, employers have implemented increasingly creative ways to…

Abstract

Employee evaluation and monitoring have been common in America since colonial times. With industrialization, employers have implemented increasingly creative ways to monitor employees. For example, in the early part of this century, Ford Motor Company employed investigators to enter employees' homes to verify that employees were not overly drinking and that their homes were clean

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 37 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Abstract

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Laurie Larwood, Sergei Rodkin and Dean Judson

The need to maintain up-to-date technological skills despite an aging workforce makes it imperative that organizations increasingly focus on retraining older employees…

Abstract

The need to maintain up-to-date technological skills despite an aging workforce makes it imperative that organizations increasingly focus on retraining older employees. This article develops an adult career model based on the acquisition of technological skills and gradual skill obsolescence. The model suggests the importance of retraining and provides practical implications to the development of retraining programs. Suggestions for future research are also offered.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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429

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

It is often stated that any organization’s most valuable asset is its workforce. Effective management of human capital is therefore crucial if the firm is to prosper. To this end, managers have an important part to play. A key feature of their role is to help entice, develop and retain talent. They additionally act as the company’s agent in establishing the psychological contract (PC) that is sometimes created between the employer and an individual worker. Psychological contracts reflect certain obligations the company makes to an employee. Managers act to facilitate these agreements that often involve both explicit and implicit pledges. Their profound understanding of the employer perspective makes them ideal for this function.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Yunus Kathawala, Kevin J. Moore and Dean Elmuti

A survey was conducted to test the preferenceof salaried employees when given the option ofincreased pay versus increased job security. Thestudy also looked at various job…

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1643

Abstract

A survey was conducted to test the preference of salaried employees when given the option of increased pay versus increased job security. The study also looked at various job characteristics and compared how employees ranked them as motivators and satisfiers. Subjects were 41 automobile industry salaried employees who responded to written questionnaires. The results showed a preference for increased salary over increase in job security. Respondents who preferred a salary increase demonstrated a less satisfied attitude with current salary and overall satisfaction with the job. Those preferring increased security ranked security higher than salary as a satisfier, but not as a motivator. Those preferring a salary increase ranked compensation higher than job security as a motivator and a satisfier. One group, male middle managers, showed a higher preference for salary increase versus increased security. Overall average response ranking of job elements resulted in compensation being ranked as the number one element in importance towards job satisfation while increase in salary for performance ranked as the number one element in importance in motivating employees. Job security ranked fifth as a satisfier and seventh as a motivator overall.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Abstract

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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