Search results

1 – 10 of 185
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Janet Elaine Franks and Carol Johns

The purpose of this paper was to identify essential resources that entrepreneurs need; to determine which resources and services are available at public libraries in two Florida…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to identify essential resources that entrepreneurs need; to determine which resources and services are available at public libraries in two Florida counties; and to suggest additional ways for public libraries to increase their value and visibility among the business community.

Design/methodology/approach

Information was gathered using structured and open-ended questions, using the Qualtrics survey technology provider, to obtain both quantitative and qualitative responses. Library administrators were contacted to identify relevant library staff to participate in the survey. Pasco County Library System administrators agreed to distribute the survey to their staff. Hillsborough County Public Library Cooperative administrators provided email addresses of staff selected to participate. Web sites of the libraries, their counties, and their partners were also examined for additional information.

Findings

The results suggest that the libraries are able to satisfy most of the requests of entrepreneurs. One exception was consulting, which was not consistently available, according to respondents, but could be offered at the library by business service organizations. Suggestions for promoting library business resources were proposed, based on survey responses and the websites of the libraries, their counties, and their business service organization partners.

Research limitations/implications

This research studied key public librarians and staff employed at Pasco and Hillsborough counties in Florida. Some of the resources identified as useful for entrepreneurs in these counties may not be generalizable to communities outside the state of Florida, or outside the USA. Additionally, the survey did not explore what is not being done or what could be done if the libraries had more resources.

Practical implications

This study provides information on the resources and services that public libraries provide entrepreneurs. It also offers suggestions for libraries to become more valuable and visible to their local business community.

Social implications

As entrepreneurs and small businesses contribute substantially to economic development, public libraries that provide assistance to them help their communities prosper.

Originality/value

This study is a collaboration between an academic reference librarian with a recent MBA degree, and an Entrepreneur Services Manager and Florida SBDC Center Director, who together provide a unique perspective and interpretive value toward promoting economic development.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Ya Luan Hsiao, Eric B. Bass, Albert W. Wu, Melissa B. Richardson, Amy Deutschendorf, Daniel J. Brotman, Michele Bellantoni, Eric E. Howell, Anita Everett, Debra Hickman, Leon Purnell, Raymond Zollinger, Carol Sylvester, Constantine G. Lyketsos, Linda Dunbar and Scott A. Berkowitz

Academic healthcare systems face great challenges in coordinating services across a continuum of care that spans hospital, community providers, home and chronic care facilities…

1200

Abstract

Purpose

Academic healthcare systems face great challenges in coordinating services across a continuum of care that spans hospital, community providers, home and chronic care facilities. The Johns Hopkins Community Health Partnership (J-CHiP) was created to improve coordination of acute, sub-acute and ambulatory care for patients, and improve the health of high-risk patients in surrounding neighborhoods. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

J-CHiP targeted adults admitted to the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, patients discharged to participating skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and high-risk Medicare and Medicaid patients receiving primary care in eight nearby outpatient sites. The primary drivers of the program were redesigned acute care delivery, seamless transitions of care and deployment of community care teams.

Findings

Acute care interventions included risk screening, multidisciplinary care planning, pharmacist-driven medication management, patient/family education, communication with next provider and care coordination protocols for common conditions. Transition interventions included post-discharge health plans, hand-offs and follow-up with primary care providers, Transition Guides, a patient access line and collaboration with SNFs. Community interventions involved forming multidisciplinary care coordination teams, integrated behavioral care and new partnerships with community-based organizations.

Originality/value

This paper offers a detailed description of the design and implementation of a complex program to improve care coordination for high-risk patients in an urban setting. The case studies feature findings from each intervention that promoted patient engagement, strengthened collaboration with community-based organizations and improved coordination of care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Carol Matheson Connell

The central focus of this paper is the mentorship relationship of economist Fritz Machlup and his graduate student Edith Penrose, and specifically how that relationship…

1249

Abstract

Purpose

The central focus of this paper is the mentorship relationship of economist Fritz Machlup and his graduate student Edith Penrose, and specifically how that relationship contributed both to her development as a scholar and to her seminal work, The Theory of the Growth of the Firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research on which this paper is based is the sociohistorical biographical approach, based on a close examination of published works and archival materials. Content analysis is used to draw inferences about Fritz Machlup's mentoring content, style, and impact on Penrose's methodology and argumentation as reflected in The Theory of the Growth of the Firm, and the correspondence exchanged while Penrose was writing The Theory of the Growth of the Firm.

Findings

The Theory of the Growth of the Firm mirrors Machlup's methodology and methodological framework. The arguments supporting Penrose's theoretic model of the growth of firms were discussed, debated and shaped by the exchange of ideas in the Penrose/Machlup correspondence.

Originality/value

While Penrose's work has been acknowledged as “breakthrough” in the areas of entrepreneurship and firm growth, there has been little recognition of the role of her mentor in its creation. This study sets out to correct what would appear to be an historical oversight as well as to understand how Machlup practiced mentorship; how he perceived the roles of mentor and mentee; Machlup's contribution to his graduate students, and the extent to which his students incorporated the learning into their own work.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2015

Carol Camp Yeakey

This paper examines the growth of private corporate influence in American higher education. A key question is corporate philanthropy and privatization at what cost? The terms…

Abstract

This paper examines the growth of private corporate influence in American higher education. A key question is corporate philanthropy and privatization at what cost? The terms often used in these discussions are commodification of the academy, privatization of a public good, or the increasing corporatization of higher education. Today, American universities are responding to the demands of the marketplace, as knowledge is being used as a form of venture capital and where professors have become academic entrepreneurs and students have become consumers. The foregoing is made more complex as an increasingly diverse student pool seeks access to postsecondary education, in the face of federal policies that serve to restrict access and financial support. A discussion of the collateral costs of our corporate culture as we face challenges to access, equity, and opportunity in America in the twenty-first century concludes this paper.

Details

Mitigating Inequality: Higher Education Research, Policy, and Practice in an Era of Massification and Stratification
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-291-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

John Goodier

44

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Jonathan S. Coley

Colleges and universities in the United States are common sites of social movement activism, yet we know little about the conditions under which campus-based movements are likely…

Abstract

Colleges and universities in the United States are common sites of social movement activism, yet we know little about the conditions under which campus-based movements are likely to meet with success or failure. In this study, I develop the concept of educational opportunity structures, and I highlight several dimensions of colleges and universities' educational opportunity structures – specifically, schools' statuses as public or private, secular or religious, highly or lowly ranked, and more or less wealthy – that can affect the outcomes of campus-based movements. Analyzing a religious freedom movement at Vanderbilt University, which mobilized from 2010 to 2012 to demand the ability of religious student organizations to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation and religious belief, I argue that Vanderbilt's status as a private, secular, elite, and wealthy university ensured that conservative Christian activism at that school was highly unlikely to succeed. The findings hold important theoretical implications for the burgeoning literature on student activism.

Abstract

Details

‘Purpose-built’ Art in Hospitals: Art with Intent
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-681-5

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Timothy C. Weiskel and Richard A. Gray

To provide a brief illustration of how the circumstances of economic underdevelopment and ecological decline are reciprocally linked, we can begin by tracing the post‐World War II…

Abstract

To provide a brief illustration of how the circumstances of economic underdevelopment and ecological decline are reciprocally linked, we can begin by tracing the post‐World War II history of Africa. Political histories of the post‐war period abound for almost all parts of the continent, since it was during this era that many African colonies struggled for and won political independence. Detailed ecological histories of colonialism and the post‐colonial states, however, are just beginning to be researched and written. Nevertheless, several broad patterns and general trends of this history are now becoming apparent, and they can be set forth in rough narrative form even though detailed histories have yet to be compiled.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 27 December 1999

Abstract

Details

Emergent Issues in the Field of Drug Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-033-3

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Kassie Freeman

In order for Black children to assimilate into the dominant culture in different countries, historically, their cultural values have been minimized or, in some cases, attempts…

Abstract

In order for Black children to assimilate into the dominant culture in different countries, historically, their cultural values have been minimized or, in some cases, attempts have been made to altogether separate them from their cultural group. This process of cultural assimilation or alienation has had a devastating effect on Black children's educational opportunities around the globe, particularly as it relates to the loss of their identity and to the underutilization of their human potential. This chapter provides an overview of the similarities of the historical experiences of Black populations globally that have led to the assimilation process of Black children where the majority population is non-Black (e.g. Australia, Great Britain, and the U.S.A.) and discusses how Black children's loss of identity has led to the underutilization of their potential. The chapter concludes with the necessity of rethinking the assimilation paradigm as one way to impact on the poverty of Black populations.

Details

Suffer The Little Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-831-6

1 – 10 of 185