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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Carol Bergeron

Successful companies make their talent strategy part of their strategic planning process and integrate it into daily operations. They strive for the alignment of their…

Abstract

Successful companies make their talent strategy part of their strategic planning process and integrate it into daily operations. They strive for the alignment of their talent with the organization’s vision, goals and business strategy. When combined with the alignment of the tools and systems used by employees, these organizations are positioned to effectively compete and win in the marketplace. However, positioning your organization for success is one thing, while making it happen is quite another.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Carol Bergeron

This article provides a practical approach for making site selection decisions driven by organizational business needs. New site selection decisions are best made when…

Abstract

This article provides a practical approach for making site selection decisions driven by organizational business needs. New site selection decisions are best made when: business needs and opportunities drive new site exploration, vision and goals to be achieved are clear, the site selection team possesses the right skill set and works to a plan. Using a practical approach fosters rapid decisionmaking. The approach is appropriate for small, medium and large companies. The practical process positions leaders to apply it quickly and help their organizations realize the benefits of new site selection as outsourcing and globalization continues at an unprecedented rate.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Luma AlMasarweh and Carol Ward

This study aims to provide a better understanding of Native American women veterans’ experiences with Veteran Administration and Indian Health Services. Eighteen…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a better understanding of Native American women veterans’ experiences with Veteran Administration and Indian Health Services. Eighteen interviews were conducted with special attention to the quality and quantity of health and mental health care services veterans accessed, the barriers and local contextual factors in accessing and utilizing services, and potential solutions to service gaps for women veterans from two Montana reservations, the Northern Cheyenne Reservation and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation.

Methodology/approach

We examine the barriers and needs of Native American veterans in both reservations using qualitative methods. The research analyzed 18 interviews with women veterans from the Northern Cheyenne and Flathead reservations.

Findings

Native American women veterans identified a number of barriers to accessing care, some of which include lack of information regarding eligibility and the types of services available. Women often found the application process to be confusing and difficult. Other barriers included distance, cost of travel, and conflicts with their work schedule.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory case study served to clarify the challenges and obstacles Native American women veterans experience with accessing health and mental health services. This research revealed several patterns and themes in the experience of Native American women veterans in both reservation communities when attempting to access and seek care at Veterans Administration (VA) facilities and Indian Health Services (IHS). This research calls for policy changes and research to clarify how resources can be more efficiently and effectively distributed to rural veterans.

Originality/value

Little research has addressed the needs of Native American veterans. American Indians and Alaska Natives serve at a higher rate in the U.S. military than any other population. This research provides important information about Native American veterans who are often underrepresented in survey research, yet a rapidly growing segment of the United States military and veteran population.

Details

Special Social Groups, Social Factors and Disparities in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-467-9

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Hyunju Shin and Lindsay R.L. Larson

Displaying a sense of humour provides various interpersonal benefits including reducing tension and promoting conflict resolution, but should a firm use humour in response…

Abstract

Purpose

Displaying a sense of humour provides various interpersonal benefits including reducing tension and promoting conflict resolution, but should a firm use humour in response to publicly viewable online customer complaints after a service failure? The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that a firm’s use of humour in response to negative online consumer reviews has both positive and negative effects on perceptions of corporate image from a customer-as-onlooker perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies are conducted and analysis of variance is used to empirically test the hypotheses.

Findings

Although humorous responses have an unfavourable influence on perceived trustworthiness of the firm, they have a favourable influence on perceived excitingness of the firm. The former influence is tied to lower perceived firm sincerity, whereas the latter is tied to higher perceived firm innovativeness and coolness. Furthermore, humour within the customer complaint itself is shown to moderate the influence of humorous responses on perceptions of the firm. Finally, regardless of the type of humour used (i.e. affiliative or aggressive humour) in the humorous response, the positive effect of humorous response remains strong, although aggressive humour further aggravates the negative impact of humorous response on trustworthiness.

Research limitations/implications

The experimental set-up may limit external validity of the study, and the research is limited to the variables examined.

Practical implications

Humorous response is identified as a non-traditional approach to online customer complaints that poses a double-edged sword for managers of service organizations. Firms should avoid using humour in online service recovery if perceptions of trustworthiness are critical or if complaints are written in a neutral tone. However, such responses may be successfully used when a firm wants to position itself as exciting and if complaints are also humorous. Finally, firms are advised to avoid aggressive humour.

Originality/value

The present research represents one of the few studies in marketing to examine the potential of injecting humour into complaint management and service recovery. In addition, this study considers the consumer-as-onlooker perspective inherent in social media.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 1994

Virginia A. Walter

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-618-2

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Siddharth Misra and Rajeev Kumar Panda

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the activities of environmental consciousness from socio-psychographic perspectives and hence evaluates its effect on brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the activities of environmental consciousness from socio-psychographic perspectives and hence evaluates its effect on brand equity through intervening elements of environmental attributes (EAt). It further attempts to research the effect of the environmental performance, environmental communication and environmental positioning in enhancing brand equity. Indian refrigeration industry, particularly the air conditioners and refrigerator brands are chosen to convey and receive the research inputs as their impact on environment is easily interpretable.

Design/methodology/approach

A hypothesized model comprising the environment consciousness and association dimensions with brand equity is framed. In total, 74 expert respondents from four state capital cities of India participated in the survey and the model has been tested in the scope of analytical hierarchy process (AHP).

Findings

The result shows that the EAt and activities can be prioritized and subsequently efficient resource allocation can be done. It also gives theoretical arguments to legitimize the environmental practices.

Practical implications

On the other hand, clients have numerous options, and a competitive advantage may not be maintained. Regardless of the fact that clients are environmentally conscious of a given refrigeration brand at the present time that they are utilizing, they may observe that they are much more charmed with a competitors’ enhanced environmental dimensions. All methods that take a try at an enhanced brand equity must be continually determined by environmental consciousness. The above can be accomplished if the evaluations of competitors by the clients are known. The AHP-ECBE technique depicted in this study accordingly helps refrigeration organization to devise and keep up a pertinent, focused plan for persistent improvements in environmental dimensions. It offers a “greater image” in brand equity administration.

Originality/value

If legitimately done in a generalized way, environmental activities like eco-literacy, interpersonal influence and value orientation can impact EAt and contribute in building brand equity.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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