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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Mario Ordaz, Mario Andrés Salgado-Gálvez, Benjamín Huerta, Juan Carlos Rodríguez and Carlos Avelar

The development of multi-hazard risk assessment frameworks has gained momentum in the recent past. Nevertheless, the common practice with openly available risk data sets…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of multi-hazard risk assessment frameworks has gained momentum in the recent past. Nevertheless, the common practice with openly available risk data sets, such as the ones derived from the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction Global Risk Model, has been to assess risk individually for each peril and afterwards aggregate, when possible, the results. Although this approach is sufficient for perils that do not have any interaction between them, for the cases where such interaction exists, and losses can be assumed to occur simultaneously, there may be underestimation of losses. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper summarizes a methodology to integrate simultaneous losses caused by earthquakes and tsunamis, with a peril-agnostic approach that can be expanded to other hazards. The methodology is applied in two relevant locations in Latin America, Acapulco (Mexico) and Callao (Peru), considering in each case building by building exposure databases with portfolios of different characteristics, where the results obtained with the proposed approach are compared against those obtained after the direct aggregation of individual losses.

Findings

The fully probabilistic risk assessment framework used herein is the same of the global risk model but applied at a much higher resolution level of the hazard and exposure data sets, showing its scalability characteristics and the opportunities to refine certain inputs to move forward into decision-making activities related to disaster risk management and reduction.

Originality/value

This paper applies for the first time the proposed methodology in a high-resolution multi-hazard risk assessment for earthquake and tsunami in two major coastal cities in Latin America.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2021

Luiz Eduardo Simão, Karine Somensi, Ricardo Villarroel Dávalos and Carlos Manuel Taboada Rodriguez

This work aims to measure the performance of an electric motors supply chain (SC) by using the Triple E performance measurement model to assess three performance…

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to measure the performance of an electric motors supply chain (SC) by using the Triple E performance measurement model to assess three performance dimensions simultaneously: efficiency, efficacy and environmental impact.

Design/methodology/approach

This research presents a real case of a Brazilian company as an example for applying the Triple E performance measurement model and the discrete-event simulation to assess the performance of an SC.

Findings

Performance measurements for the three dimensions were the following: (1) for efficiency, a high inventory cost in the SC, driven by the distribution center (DC) (49.7% total cost); an order cycle time operating with an average of 21.7 days and a logistic channel transport capacity of 88%; (2) for efficacy, a service level of 98% for all channels; (3) for environmental impact, the SC emits a total of 395,733 kg of CO2 annually, with the DC and the regional distribution center (RDC2) being the largest emitters.

Originality/value

This work allowed to measure the performance of an SC interface (manufacturing process, a DC and three regional distribution centers). It was possible to measure the inventory holding cost and out-of-stock inventory costs, order cycle time, SC service level, transport capacity utilization and CO2 emissions in the transportation process of each SC stage and the whole SC. This study can be used as a decision support guide for academics and practitioners to measure and improve the SC performance.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Carlos Rafael Rodríguez-Solera and Marisol Silva-Laya

The purpose of this article is to present the experience of a Central American university that has been successfully advancing an educational model focused on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present the experience of a Central American university that has been successfully advancing an educational model focused on sustainability for over 25 years. Many universities in industrialized nations are assuming a more active role in promoting sustainable development, while in emerging countries, interest in this issue is recent and not well known.

Design/methodology/approach

A study was conducted on perceptions of the impact from graduates of EARTH (Escuela de Agricultura de la Región Tropical Húmeda) University in Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala, utilizing a mixed methodology that combined the application of a standardized questionnaire, together with focus groups of graduates, and semi-structured interviews of graduates, their employers, members of their communities, clients of the companies where they work and colleagues.

Findings

Agricultural engineers who received their education at EARTH University have had a positive social, economic and environmental impact in their communities of origin. They have taken on leadership positions and have become change agents who are aware of the social needs around them. They contribute to economic growth and job creation, and at the same time, promote sustainable management of natural resources.

Research limitations/implications

It is a case study and their findings are limited.

Practical implications

Learning about EARTH University’s experience may be useful for other higher education institutions seeking to cultivate this perspective in their degree programs, and for academics who support a fundamental reorientation in higher education aimed at confronting the challenge of promoting sustainable development.

Social implications

The results established that most of the agronomists who studied at EARTH University are having a positive economic, social and environmental influence, which appears to be closely associated with their university education. This suggests that higher education may in effect play an important role in promoting sustainability and contributing elements for advancing this perspective in higher education in Latin America.

Originality/value

This study of EARTH University’s educational model reveals that, in the case of Latin America, education for sustainability cannot be limited to providing training in natural resources management. The promotion of inclusive development supposes that students have learned how to manage productive activities that are economically and socially sustainable, and that students have received a solid education in values, aimed at fostering a commitment to build a fairer society.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez, Miguel Cordova, Michel Hermans, Karla Maria Nava-Aguirre, Fabiola Monje-Cueto, Santiago Mingo, Santiago Tobon, Carlos Adrian Rodriguez, Erica Helena Salvaj and Dinorá Eliete Floriani

This study aims to build on embedded approaches to stakeholder management and examines how organizational decision-makers consider social responsibility toward proximal…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to build on embedded approaches to stakeholder management and examines how organizational decision-makers consider social responsibility toward proximal stakeholders in crises that encompass an entire system of stakeholder relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Within a criterion-based sample of eight Latin American private universities, this paper develops in-depth exploratory case studies to examine the prioritization of stakeholders in higher education institutions’ decision-making during the outbreak of the COVID-19 crisis.

Findings

Contrary to the notion that during crises organizations prioritize stakeholders that provide resources that are critical to survival, this study finds that in contextual crises stakeholder management is informed by social responsibility. In addition, the findings suggest that crises may be tipping points for changes toward mission-driven approaches to governance.

Practical implications

Acknowledging the roles of social responsibility and proximity in stakeholder management during contextual crises allows for more informed governance of organizations that face disruptions in their system of stakeholder relations.

Originality/value

This study contributes unique insights into the decision-maker’s prioritization of stakeholders during the COVID-19 crisis. The uncertainty associated with the emerging “new normal” allowed for an extreme test of socially embedded versus resource-oriented approaches to stakeholder management.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Carlos Rodríguez Casal

This work shows the evolution regarding regulation of location services in both the USA and the EU. The article explains why these services were first regulated and the…

Abstract

This work shows the evolution regarding regulation of location services in both the USA and the EU. The article explains why these services were first regulated and the regulation itself is then explained. Two of the most important issues regarding location information are privacy protection and unsolicited communications. Shown here is the huge commercial value of location information and how the user’s approval can be manipulated to obtain consent to process and use as much information as possible.

Details

info, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Satie Ledoux Takeda-Berger, Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Carlos Manuel Taboada Rodriguez, Enzo Morosini Frazzon, Tamie Takeda Yokoyama and Marco Aurélio de Oliveira

The purpose of this paper is to classify the main barriers related to the implementation of lean supply chain management (LSCM) and prioritize its main practices. A case…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to classify the main barriers related to the implementation of lean supply chain management (LSCM) and prioritize its main practices. A case study approach was conducted to obtain values for the intensity of the relationship between LSCM practices and barriers to mitigate or even anticipate difficulties in its implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study in a company in southern Brazil that is in lean implementation is used for conducting this research. The methodology was structured in three steps, namely, classification of the main barriers through risk analysis, selection of LSCM practices appropriate to the company context and ranking and prioritization of the main practices of LSCM related to the barriers to lean implementation.

Findings

As a result, with the combination of two approaches, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and analytical hierarchical process (AHP), it was possible to obtain values for the intensity of the relationship between LSCM practices and barriers. From the 12 barriers, 5 reached a high-risk degree that can be mitigated, and among the 18 practices found, 7 have the potential to be implemented.

Originality/value

This research allows direct efforts to continuously improve the supply chain to mitigate or even anticipate difficulties in its implementation. The proposed methodology, combining FMEA and AHP is easy to apply and understand, allowing managers and professionals to replicate it in the context of their supply chain and verify results similar and comparable to those obtained here.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Gustavo Morales-Alonso, Yilsy Núñez Guerrero, Juan Francisco Aguilera and Carlos Rodríguez-Monroy

This study aims at shedding light on entrepreneurial aspirations on both developed and developing economies, in terms of contextual and individual values. Among the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at shedding light on entrepreneurial aspirations on both developed and developing economies, in terms of contextual and individual values. Among the former, economic development and inequalities are sought after, while among the latter national culture is the variable under study.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used are extracted from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor for a panel of countries, where the entrepreneurial aspirations of individuals of each country are measured through the Total early-stage Entrepreneurial Activity (TEA). The influence of cultural values as defined by Hofstede (individualism-collectivism (IDV), masculinity–femininity (MAS) and uncertainty avoidance (UAI)), moderated by the development level of the country and the existing inequalities are analyzed through artificial neural network (ANN) and multilayer perceptron (MLP) techniques.

Findings

Results show that in the post-crisis era, entrepreneurial aspirations are negatively linked to individualism in developing countries. In developed countries, however, entrepreneurship is not linked to individualism but to inequalities.

Originality/value

Entrepreneurial aspirations have not been thoroughly studied in the post-crisis era. We prove that entrepreneurial orientations have changed, together with the world, in the last decade. Cultural differences between countries tend to moderate, especially among developed ones, which speak of homogenization of national cultures. In this regard, inequalities are the determining factor. Contrarily, in developing countries, the differences in individualism are noticeable when it comes to analyzing entrepreneurial aspirations.

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Carlos M. Rodriguez, Jorge A. Wise and Carlos Ruy Martinez

This study aims to examine in the context of high involvement exporting Mexican firms a model which suggests that a blend of absorptive and dynamic capabilities is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine in the context of high involvement exporting Mexican firms a model which suggests that a blend of absorptive and dynamic capabilities is necessary to build and sustain their competitiveness in international markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 119 high involvement Mexican exporting firms through informants. Formative and reflective constructs were validated through MIMIC models and confirmatory factor analysis using LISREL. The theoretical model was tested using partial least squares (PLS).

Findings

Results suggest that high involvement Mexican exporting firms' capacity to adapt through product design, technology management, manufacturing processes, and cooperative relationships impacts their innovation and market expansion-adaptation capabilities. Nurturing an entrepreneurship orientation is critical to build flexibility, transfer innovation to markets, and drive export performance. Ultimately, performance is determined by the firms' ability to design and develop products through the adoption of improved technologies, a deep understanding of international demands, and an ability to refocus exporting strategies as changes in competitive contexts require.

Research limitations/implications

The design of exporting capabilities in this study only applies to high involvement exporting firms.

Practical implications

High involvement exporting firms sustain growth through the development of exploration (learning), exploitation (expansion-adaptation), and dynamic (innovation, entrepreneurship) capabilities as determinant of performance.

Originality/value

This is the first model that tests relationships among learning, manufacturing flexibility, and market expansion-adaptation and dynamic capabilities such as innovation and entrepreneurship and their impact on performance in high involvement Mexican exporting firms.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Carlos Rodríguez Casal

Commercial non‐solicited communications are a growing problem bringing calls for tighter anti‐Spam legislation. This paper compares the advantages and disadvantages of…

Abstract

Commercial non‐solicited communications are a growing problem bringing calls for tighter anti‐Spam legislation. This paper compares the advantages and disadvantages of opt‐in and opt‐out schemes. An opt‐in scheme would provide the best protection for citizens’ privacy and property. However, the fragmented way in which EU legislation is being implemented shows how the geographic limitations of the legislation may make opt‐in partially useless and harmful for competition. This paper therefore concludes that opt‐out with “public” international lists are the best compromise.

Details

info, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Carlos Rodríguez Casal

The purpose of this paper is to call for integrated regulation for in‐car systems to ensure privacy and prevent citizens from having to choose between accepting the loss

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to call for integrated regulation for in‐car systems to ensure privacy and prevent citizens from having to choose between accepting the loss of privacy or losing out on services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper highlights the ways in which in‐car communications systems can contribute to the web of surveillance that is beginning to pervade society. More and more frequently, intelligent transportation systems compute location data, in‐car services for drivers and passengers are becoming more popular and in‐car systems are incorporating other control features that may threaten privacy. In particular this study describes the existing regulations regarding location, and the advisability of allowing access to electronic health records in emergencies.

Findings

The study presents different threats to privacy within telematics and raises concerns about the financial value of the aggregated information. It recommends that not only the user's location information but also the user's health records be transferred to emergency services.

Originality/value

These new views on telematics data processing should be considered by stakeholders and policy makers to ensure security and services to the citizens.

1 – 10 of 596