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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2016

Carlo Cristiano

Marshall, Pigou, and Keynes on one side of the Atlantic, and Fisher on the other, had different approaches to the quantity theory of money. But they shared its basic…

Abstract

Marshall, Pigou, and Keynes on one side of the Atlantic, and Fisher on the other, had different approaches to the quantity theory of money. But they shared its basic framework, with the result that theoretical discussions did not prevent some degree of mutual support on policy proposals. If a divergence there was, at this stage, this pertained the feasibility of Fisher’s proposals, because Fisher’s enthusiasm for reform could find no match at Cambridge. This notwithstanding, and although in varying degrees, Marshall, Pigou, and Keynes were sympathetic with Fisher’s battle for “stable money.” Indeed, a fragment from the Keynes Papers shows that, at a very early stage of his career, Keynes paid great attention to Fisher’s empirical research on the relationship between “Appreciation and interest,” taking the relation between nominal and real rates of interest as a possible explanation of the trade cycle. For some time at least, this widened the common ground upon which Fisher’s proposals for “stable money” could find some support at Cambridge.

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Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-962-6

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2016

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Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-962-6

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2020

Massimo Di Matteo

The author examines the argument elaborated by Pigou in his Employment and Equilibrium. A Theoretical Discussion which was the first comprehensive answer Pigou gave to the…

Abstract

The author examines the argument elaborated by Pigou in his Employment and Equilibrium. A Theoretical Discussion which was the first comprehensive answer Pigou gave to the analysis put forward by Keynes in his General Theory. The chapter consists of seven sections. In the first, the motivation of the chapter is outlined. In the second, third, and fourth sections, the author will concentrate on how Pigou elucidates the conditions necessary for an economic system to attain a short period flow equilibrium. In this context, the author elaborates an “open” macro model which can be “closed” in two different ways. The chapter will also present a diagrammatic analysis of Pigou’s theory in the two cases elucidating the structure and the working of the model. Differences with the author’s previous book (TU) related to (real/monetary) wage inflexibility and the importance of monetary factors are also described and discussed. Pigou however does not limit himself to deal with the short period but engages in an interesting discussion of the long period centered on the notion of stationary state that is the object of section five. In this way, he admits that Keynes’s theory is not limited, to the short run. In arguing along these lines, he comes close to describe what will be recognized later as the Pigou effect. A short comparison with the renewed stagnationist theory is sketched. The sixth section includes a brief discussion of the comparative statics and dynamic analyzes elaborated by Pigou. A final section including a few conclusions completes the chapter.

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Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on Sir James Steuart: The Political Economy of Money and Trade
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-707-7

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Giulia Achilli, Cristiano Busco and Elena Giovannoni

The paper explores the process of construction of the “accountable self”, particularly as this process engages with the spirituality of the self. This study examines the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper explores the process of construction of the “accountable self”, particularly as this process engages with the spirituality of the self. This study examines the “space of accountability” within which the accountable self constructs itself as such and investigates how different accounts of the self are drawn upon in the making of this space, both defining and transcending it.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies upon archival material concerning accounting and accountability practices about the project for building the altar of St. Ignatius in the Church of Gesù, Rome, Italy (1691–1706). This study examines calculative and narrative accounts about the project from the perspective of the superintendent, who was the sole person accountable for the building works.

Findings

Whereas calculative accounts enabled the self to account for actions within the specific space of accountability of the project, narrative accounts opened up this space, providing for a testimony of actions and a gift of accountability towards future indefinite others. This process was prompted by the spirituality of the self and the narcissistic gratification of fulfilling this spirituality.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the literature on the accountable self and to theological perspectives into accountability. This study suggests exploring how different accounts of the self engage with each other through testimony, gift, narcissism and spirituality in the construction of the accountable self, providing for a “transcendent” space of accountability. This research also adds to studies on narrative accounts by showing that they are drawn upon alongside calculative accounts in the construction of the transcendent, accountable self.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2011

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Entrepreneurship and Global Competitiveness in Regional Economies: Determinants and Policy Implications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-395-8

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

William Greene

Simulation-based methods and simulation-assisted estimators have greatly increased the reach of empirical applications in econometrics. The received literature includes a…

Abstract

Simulation-based methods and simulation-assisted estimators have greatly increased the reach of empirical applications in econometrics. The received literature includes a thick layer of theoretical studies, including landmark works by Gourieroux and Monfort (1996), McFadden and Ruud (1994), and Train (2003), and hundreds of applications. An early and still influential application of the method is Berry, Levinsohn, and Pakes's (1995) (BLP) application to the U.S. automobile market in which a market equilibrium model is cleared of latent heterogeneity by integrating the heterogeneity out of the moments in a GMM setting. BLP's methodology is a baseline technique for studying market equilibrium in empirical industrial organization. Contemporary applications involving multilayered models of heterogeneity in individual behavior such as that in Riphahn, Wambach, and Million's (2003) study of moral hazard in health insurance are also common. Computation of multivariate probabilities by using simulation methods is now a standard technique in estimating discrete choice models. The mixed logit model for modeling preferences (McFadden & Train, 2000) is now the leading edge of research in multinomial choice modeling. Finally, perhaps the most prominent application in the entire arena of simulation-based estimation is the current generation of Bayesian econometrics based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. In this area, heretofore intractable estimators of posterior means are routinely estimated with the assistance of simulation and the Gibbs sampler.

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Maximum Simulated Likelihood Methods and Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-150-4

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

Chandra R. Bhat, Cristiano Varin and Nazneen Ferdous

This chapter compares the performance of the maximum simulated likelihood (MSL) approach with the composite marginal likelihood (CML) approach in multivariate…

Abstract

This chapter compares the performance of the maximum simulated likelihood (MSL) approach with the composite marginal likelihood (CML) approach in multivariate ordered-response situations. The ability of the two approaches to recover model parameters in simulated data sets is examined, as is the efficiency of estimated parameters and computational cost. Overall, the simulation results demonstrate the ability of the CML approach to recover the parameters very well in a 5–6 dimensional ordered-response choice model context. In addition, the CML recovers parameters as well as the MSL estimation approach in the simulation contexts used in this study, while also doing so at a substantially reduced computational cost. Further, any reduction in the efficiency of the CML approach relative to the MSL approach is in the range of nonexistent to small. When taken together with its conceptual and implementation simplicity, the CML approach appears to be a promising approach for the estimation of not only the multivariate ordered-response model considered here, but also for other analytically intractable econometric models.

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Maximum Simulated Likelihood Methods and Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-150-4

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2016

Marc Wouters, Susana Morales, Sven Grollmuss and Michael Scheer

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product development, and it provides a comparison to an earlier review of the management accounting (MA) literature (Wouters & Morales, 2014).

Methodology/approach

This structured literature search covers papers published in 23 journals in IOM in the period 1990–2014.

Findings

The search yielded a sample of 208 unique papers with 275 results (one paper could refer to multiple cost management methods). The top 3 methods are modular design, component commonality, and product platforms, with 115 results (42%) together. In the MA literature, these three methods accounted for 29%, but target costing was the most researched cost management method by far (26%). Simulation is the most frequently used research method in the IOM literature, whereas this was averagely used in the MA literature; qualitative studies were the most frequently used research method in the MA literature, whereas this was averagely used in the IOM literature. We found a lot of papers presenting practical approaches or decision models as a further development of a particular cost management method, which is a clear difference from the MA literature.

Research limitations/implications

This review focused on the same cost management methods, and future research could also consider other cost management methods which are likely to be more important in the IOM literature compared to the MA literature. Future research could also investigate innovative cost management practices in more detail through longitudinal case studies.

Originality/value

This review of research on methods for cost management published outside the MA literature provides an overview for MA researchers. It highlights key differences between both literatures in their research of the same cost management methods.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Nnamdi Madichie

The purpose of this paper is to show how one of the biggest phenomena of the twenty‐first century is the internationalisation of professional sports and how premier league…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how one of the biggest phenomena of the twenty‐first century is the internationalisation of professional sports and how premier league football epitomises this. With the influx of foreign players, managers and now owners, European League Football has become big business. This paper aims to provide a theoretical analysis of the management implications of foreign players in the English Premiership League football – renamed the Barclays Premier League to suit the needs of its major sponsors.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted is purely qualitative in nature, evaluating the top Barclays Premier League teams and the impact of globalisation on their reconfigurations since the early 1990s to date. The study draws mainly from a review of the extant literature on sports and management, as well as a critical analysis of media reports.

Findings

Globalisation has emerged as a new force that has changed the way corporations are managed. Financial services, retail and information technology firms have all responded to this new wave – and so also has sports. Unfortunately while sports have the potential to teach lessons on management strategy, management researchers seem to have relegated sports to the sociology and psychology disciplines.

Practical implications

The Barclays Premier league football provides a unique environment for management decisions and processes to occur in a range of markets and at varied levels. However, the globalisation of professional sports has received relatively very little attention in the academic literature – especially in the field of business and management.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the scant literature on the management implications of football by highlighting how globalisation has affected and reconfigured professional sports using the influx of foreign players into the English football league as a point of departure.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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