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Article

Carl‐Henric Nilsson and Håkan Nordahl

Develops a framework for manufacturing flexibility whichillustrates how to obtain consistency from manufacturing strategy to theresource characteristics in the production…

Abstract

Develops a framework for manufacturing flexibility which illustrates how to obtain consistency from manufacturing strategy to the resource characteristics in the production system. Provides guidance on how to analyse and develop manufacturing flexibility in a corporate decision‐making context. Uses the well‐known input‐transformation‐output (ITO) model as a starting point for building the frame‐work. Makes a clear distinction between internal and external factors impinging on the company, connecting the market demand for flexibility, the characteristics of the production system and the flexibility of the suppliers. Pursues the connection from the strategic level to the individual resource characteristics in the production system.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article

Carl‐Henric Nilsson and Håkan Nordahl

Structures the concept of flexibility by making clear distinctionsin three generic dimensions, describes the use of the framework formanufacturing flexibility by working…

Abstract

Structures the concept of flexibility by making clear distinctions in three generic dimensions, describes the use of the framework for manufacturing flexibility by working through a concrete example. The framework was presented in “Making manufacturing flexibility operational – part 1: a framework”, IMS, Vol. 6 No. 2. Makes distinctions between the concept of flexibility in the three generic dimensions: utilized flexibility versus potential flexibility, external flexibility versus internal flexibility, and requested flexibility versus replied flexibility. The framework makes a clear distinction between the internal and the external factors impinging on the company, and brings together the market demand for flexibility, the characteristics of the production system, and the flexibility of the suppliers. Furthermore, pursues the connection from the strategic level to the single resource characteristics in the production system. Using the framework as a systematization for handling flexibility related issues in companies, can be especially useful for managers.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article

Håkan Nordahl and Carl‐Henric Nilsson

Managers’ perceptions of flexibility in manufacturing were investigated in a research case study conducted at six Swedish companies within the engineering industry. The…

Abstract

Managers’ perceptions of flexibility in manufacturing were investigated in a research case study conducted at six Swedish companies within the engineering industry. The goal of the study was to establish which factors managers considered to be important for manufacturing flexibility and how companies and managers perceived flexibility. The size of the company, the complexity of the products and the level of technology used in production were factors found to be important for issues concerning manufacturing flexibility. The findings have implications for both managers and researchers. Managers should be aware of the lack of conformity in the perception of flexibility within companies and its possible consequences. Gives researchers suggestions based on this study, for further research in manufacturing flexibility.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article

Carl‐Henric Nilsson and David Ford

Intellectual capital has gained increasing attention concerning both research and more practically oriented applications during the past five years. Intellectual Capital…

Abstract

Intellectual capital has gained increasing attention concerning both research and more practically oriented applications during the past five years. Intellectual Capital and other knowledge management tools are topics that have emerged in the light of a broader trend of redirecting the foundation of competitive advantage from the company's tangible assets to its intangibles such as knowledge base, brands and the content and structure of computer‐based systems. In this paper, the concept of intellectual potential is introduced. Intellectual potential is a further development of intellectual capital, using four principles: strategy basis; management orientation; process orientation; and context sensitivity. The concept is a tool for the strategic management of an organisation's intangible assets in order to increase its long‐term revenue‐generating capabilities. The case of Alfa Laval is used as an illustration of how intellectual potential can add value as a management tool.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article

Pernilla Derwik and Daniel Hellström

This paper aims to present an integrated view of the literature published on all aspects and facets of competence in supply chain management (SCM) and furthermore provides…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an integrated view of the literature published on all aspects and facets of competence in supply chain management (SCM) and furthermore provides a framework for classifying and analyzing literature to facilitate further study, practice and research.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review identified 98 peer-reviewed scientific journal publications on the subject of competence in SCM.

Findings

This review identifies and classifies the key content of the subject based on whose competence (level of analysis) and the type of competence (competence element), resulting in a framework that brings together aspects at the individual and organizational level, and of the functional, relational, managerial and behavioral elements of competence from the SCM literature. It furthermore displays the timeliness and wide-ranging character of the subject, as presented by the evolutionary timeline and the main research streams.

Research limitations/implications

Although competence in SCM is a key to business success, the subject is ambiguous and an explicit need exists for more research. This paper provides a foundation for future examination of and theory building in this subject. It also alerts researchers to complementary studies outside of their own “customary” domains.

Practical implications

This paper can support managers in their pursuit to secure competence in SCM and thereby improve outcomes on both individual and organizational level. It can furthermore assist in the development of relevant programs and training sessions.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this work represents the first systematic literature review on the subject of competence in SCM. In addition, it proposes a taxonomy for mapping and evaluating research on this subject.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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