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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Jae H. Song and Carl R. Adams

Seeks to expand managers′ awareness of the opportunities availablefor differentiating their products by increasing or decreasing thecustomer′s involvement in production or…

Abstract

Seeks to expand managers′ awareness of the opportunities available for differentiating their products by increasing or decreasing the customer′s involvement in production or delivery. Presents a specific method for identifying opportunities for participation differentiation. Also seeks to clarify the managerial impacts that result from using customer involvement as a part of the production of delivery process.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Carl Adams and David Avison

The literature about the development of information systems tends to concentrate on methodologies, techniques and tools. There is significant published research about the…

Abstract

The literature about the development of information systems tends to concentrate on methodologies, techniques and tools. There is significant published research about the potential negative aspects of using methodologies and tools (along with that discussing their potential benefits). Techniques, on the other hand, are seen largely as benign, very often as simple aids to help carry out a task, and are used in many methodologies. They might be seen as supporting the collection, collation, analysis, representation or communication of information about system requirements and attributes (or a combination of these). However, it is argued in this paper that techniques also have negative aspects and there are as many dangers in their use as in using methodologies and tools. In particular, techniques may restrict understanding by framing the ways of thinking about the problem situation. In other words, people’s understanding of a problem can be profoundly influenced by how the problem is presented to them by the technique. Different development techniques can represent the same problem situation differently, and the way in which it is represented has considerable potential for influencing problem understanding and resultant decision making. Drawing on the cognitive psychology literature enables one to show how specific visual and linguistic characteristics of techniques may influence problem understanding. In addition, examining the taken‐for‐granted paradigm of a particular technique provides a further dimension influencing problem understanding. This knowledge of visual/language and paradigm attributes is applied to over 80 techniques used to a greater or lesser extent in IS development, indicating how different types of technique are likely to influence problem cognition. This serves two purposes. First, it exposes potential biases of a particular technique and makes users aware of the potential dangers. Second, the overall categorization may provide guidance to users in selecting appropriate techniques and combinations of techniques to help reduce any negative framing influences, provide a more holistic view of a problem situation and support a more appropriate problem‐learning environment.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Carl Adams and Andreas Neef

This chapter presents an exploration of the ways in which humanitarian non-government organisations (NGOs) and communities affected by the 2014 floods in Solomon Islands…

Abstract

This chapter presents an exploration of the ways in which humanitarian non-government organisations (NGOs) and communities affected by the 2014 floods in Solomon Islands interpreted and responded to the disaster, identifying factors that assisted and constrained stakeholders in disaster response and recovery. The research investigates the extent to which communities were consulted and participated in NGO responses, and the factors which informed community–NGO relationships. A qualitative case study approach was used, employing interviews, focus groups and document analysis, guided by a reflexive discourse analysis and narrative inquiry approach, which places the focus of the study on the experiences of participants. Communities played very limited roles in NGO responses, especially non-dominant or marginalised sectors of society, such as youth, women and people with disabilities. Failure to respond appropriately to the differentiated needs of affected populations can exacerbate their risk of experiencing secondary disaster. The authors argue that there is a need to improve the inclusiveness of responses to disaster, engaging women, youth and people with disabilities in decision making in order to respond more appropriately to their needs.

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Climate-Induced Disasters in the Asia-Pacific Region: Response, Recovery, Adaptation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-987-8

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

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Climate-Induced Disasters in the Asia-Pacific Region: Response, Recovery, Adaptation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-987-8

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Karl Spracklen

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Metal Music and the Re-imagining of Masculinity, Place, Race and Nation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-444-1

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Andreas Neef and Natasha Pauli

Multi-risk environments pose challenges for rural and coastal communities in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly with regard to disaster risk management and climate…

Abstract

Multi-risk environments pose challenges for rural and coastal communities in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly with regard to disaster risk management and climate change adaptation strategies. While much research has been published on disaster response and recovery for specific climate-related hazards in the region, such as cyclones, floods and droughts, there is a growing need for insight into how communities respond, recover and adapt to the multiple, intersecting risks posed by environmental, societal and economic change. This chapter frames the body of new research presented in this book from the perspective of multi-risk environments, paying particular attention to concepts central to the disaster response and recovery cycle, and rejecting the notion of a distinct boundary between climate and society. Further, this introductory chapter foregrounds the importance of cultural values, power relations, Indigenous knowledge systems, local networks and community-based adaptive capacities when considering resilience, recovery and adaptation to climate-induced disasters at the community and household level. Overviews of the research presented in this book demonstrate a diverse range of responses and adaptive strategies at the local level in case studies from Solomon Islands, Fiji, Cambodia and Samoa, as well as implications for policy, planning and management.

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Climate-Induced Disasters in the Asia-Pacific Region: Response, Recovery, Adaptation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-987-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Eleanor H. Wynn and Edgar Whitley

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Information Technology & People, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-617-5

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2015

Julia Adams and George Steinmetz

Imperial crisis is the analytical axis on which turn two national states of emergency: the Weimar Republic (1918–1933) and the United States on the so-called “Eve of…

Abstract

Imperial crisis is the analytical axis on which turn two national states of emergency: the Weimar Republic (1918–1933) and the United States on the so-called “Eve of Destruction” (1965–1975). But while Max Weber disagreed with Carl Schmitt with respect to the problem of sovereignty at the core of the German imperium, American sociologists – even those inspired by Weber – by and large did not register the gravity of the moment of political decision in their work, or the imperial crisis that their country faced during the Vietnam War and its aftermath. This essay offers ideas regarding why this was so, what the consequences have been for American sociology, and how, in the midst of the present-day imperial and domestic governmental crisis, we might adopt a more expansive view.

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Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-757-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Kenneth E. Dowlin

Maggie III is an integrated system that supports a public access catalog, cataloging interface, bibliographic maintenance, circulation, electronic mail, and community…

Abstract

Maggie III is an integrated system that supports a public access catalog, cataloging interface, bibliographic maintenance, circulation, electronic mail, and community information databases. Acquisitions and serials modules are under development. The system, available from the Eyring Research Institute, is based on software created for the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (CARL). Sidebars describe 1) the structure of the community information databases, 2) the planned use of the CARL software by other libraries in Colorado, and 3) the mounting and use of the non‐bibliographic database, “A Matter of Fact”, on the CARL system.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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