Search results

1 – 10 of over 101000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Alisoun Milne and Eleni Hatzidimitriadou

Caring in Later Life is a review of the needs and roles of older carers (Milne et al, 2001). It brings together a wide‐ranging review of academic and policy literature…

Abstract

Caring in Later Life is a review of the needs and roles of older carers (Milne et al, 2001). It brings together a wide‐ranging review of academic and policy literature with an original meta‐analysis of the 1995 General Household Survey (OPCS, 1995). This paper focuses on the findings of the GHS analysis. The picture of older carers that emerges is significantly different from that of carers overall.It is clear that older carers constitute a large and growing number of the carers and represent an increasingly large proportion of the total number of UK carers. They can be distinguished from other groups of carers in a number of ways: older carers are more likely to live with the person they care for, caring is likely to take place within the context of a long term relationship, dementia is a dominant feature and carers are more likely to be involved in intimate and personal care. Many also have health problems of their own. The analysis confirms a distinction between older carers who offer support on a co‐resident basis and those who are extra resident. There is clearly a high level of devotion to caring amongst many co‐resident carers, with many providing intensive care over long periods of time with little or no support from services. Most of these carers are spouses. The authors suggest that more should and can be done by policy and services to improve the health and quality of life of older carers.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Sue Hollinrake and Will Thomas

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the nature of support that helps older people continue living in their own homes for as long as they wish to.

Downloads
1347

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the nature of support that helps older people continue living in their own homes for as long as they wish to.

Design/methodology/approach

The research made use of a participatory approach in which service users, service providers and commissioners were involved in the design of the approach in addition to contributing to the research as participants in their own right.

Findings

This paper presents analysis from the research which focuses on the importance of caring relationships for providing a support mechanism. The authors question whether budget cuts and efficiency drives within statutory care providers preclude the notion of caring relationships.

Practical implications

The authors suggest, in the light of the evidence presented, that statutory service providers should acknowledge the role that caring relationships play in providing support for older people. Whilst budget cuts make providing support for caring relationships more challenging, the authors suggest that there is scope for delivering services and support in ways which promote the types of interactions which better support older people living independently.

Originality/value

The analysis presented here provides a distinctive, timely and thoughtful insight into support for older people at a time when public sector budgets are under increasing pressure.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 35 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Take Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-292-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Orly Benjamin

When public agencies seek to privatize a service, a commissioning process begins wherein public sector budgeters must decide how generous the funding will be while taking…

Abstract

Purpose

When public agencies seek to privatize a service, a commissioning process begins wherein public sector budgeters must decide how generous the funding will be while taking occupational standards into account so that the quality of service is assured. One important area of occupational standards is the required personnel and job sizes of certified employees. Not enough attention has been directed to how occupational standards’ related knowledge is treated in the process. The purpose of this paper is to: first, investigate how the commissioning process is experienced by Israeli, often female, occupational standards administrators. Second, proposing a gendered perspective on Sennett’s corrosion of character thesis.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of an institutional ethnography project, 16 interviews were conducted with (14 female and two male) occupational standards administrators at the Israeli Welfare, Education and Health Ministries.

Findings

The routine of commissioning involves a stage of using occupational standards’ knowledge and experience, and a stage of dismissing it. The “corrosion of character” embedded in the dismissal stage undermines historical achievements in the area of recognizing caring work and skills.

Research limitations/implications

The research is unable to distinguish between the specific caring occupations discussed.

Practical implications

Service delivery modes has to develop into more publicly visible forums where occupational standards’ are protected.

Social implications

The continuous corrosion of occupational knowledge may result in the demise of professionalization in care service occupations causing increasingly more polarization and poverty among their employees.

Originality/value

While Sennett’s thesis has already been found plausible for understanding public servants’ experiences of the “new public management,” until recently, not enough attention has been devoted to the commissioning processes’ gendered implications for contract-based delivery of services. This paper examines these implications for the power struggle between the feminist achievements protecting skill recognition in caring occupations, and policy makers.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Traci Cascioli, Hasan Al‐Madfai, Paul Oborne and Sue Phelps

This study investigated, by way of interview (n=45), the needs of those caring for a person with dementia and their satisfaction with current services in the Caerphilly…

Abstract

This study investigated, by way of interview (n=45), the needs of those caring for a person with dementia and their satisfaction with current services in the Caerphilly County Borough of South Wales. Carers reported having the most difficulty coping with the demands on their time and the emotional strain associated with caring. Carers requested more information regarding available services, the diagnosis of dementia and the legal and financial aspects of caring. They also mentioned the need for a night‐sitter service, a 24‐hour helpline, more support groups and more visits from social workers and community psychiatric nurses (CPNs). On the whole, the carers were satisfied with the services provided, although their use of these services was not extensive. However, issues around lack of support, quality and availability of homes and hospitals and poor communications were identified as areas of concern. The findings were welcomed by strategic planners and the information is being used as a basis for developing and improving specific carer support services.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Rolf Rønning

This article is about the implications of the different uses of the concept of care in the research and debate on home care. It can be read as a comment on the British…

Abstract

This article is about the implications of the different uses of the concept of care in the research and debate on home care. It can be read as a comment on the British debate, seen with Norwegian eyes, and from a starting point where care is a positively loaded concept. The article begins with a definition of care, in order to try to identify some core elements, and then proceeds to examine two main lines of attack on care in the British debate. A distinction between care as an ideal and as practice is introduced, and the article tries to demonstrate how the outcome of caring can be seen as a result both of political attitudes and of different forms of organisation. The article concludes by discussing why we need to save ‘care’ as a positive concept in the evaluation of formal systems providing care as a social service.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

Karan Jutlla and Neil Moreland

While personalisation and service choice remains a central plank of the Labour Government's policies in health and social care, there is a growing evidence base confirming…

Abstract

While personalisation and service choice remains a central plank of the Labour Government's policies in health and social care, there is a growing evidence base confirming that ethnic minority groups, are disadvantaged as service users in the UK. Building on some baseline data collected in 2000 and 2003/04, our recent research (Jutlla & Moreland, 2007) has reaffirmed the difficulties that Asian carers have in accessing services when caring for a relative with dementia.While such access data is important, we wish to move beyond the demographic aspects to consider the existential realities (the ontology) of the lives and cultures of those in minority ethnic groups. This paper consequently discusses the diversity and complexity of migration patterns among the Sikh community living in Wolverhampton. The paper conceptualises some of the ways in which different migration experiences and the realities of daily life influence the perceptions, experiences and patterns of care among migrant Sikh carers in Wolverhampton caring for an older person with dementia. The paper thus explores the thesis that the Sikh community is not a homogeneous group; and that the diversity and differences within the Sikh community can have important implications for care. Taking a biographical narrative approach to fieldwork, the relevant factors to be considered include: the carer's country of origin; their migration route and reasons for migration; their age at migration and the cultural experiences of the carers and their communities both in the UK and India.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Hilary Brown, Sophie Burns and Margaret Flynn

This paper reports some preliminary lessons from a qualitative study of services that have cared for a person with learning disabilities during a terminal illness. It…

Downloads
118

Abstract

This paper reports some preliminary lessons from a qualitative study of services that have cared for a person with learning disabilities during a terminal illness. It reflects current concern about access to health care as well as the national priority being placed on improvements in cancer services for all patients. The study documents how the service learned of the person's illness, how they mobilised services and made decisions, how agencies worked together (or not!) and what support staff needed in the person's last months and weeks. It also considers the way staff, as individuals and as teams, made sense of their experiences and evaluated the input of other professionals.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Aoife Mahon, Elizabeth Tilley, Gurch Randhawa, Yannis Pappas and Jitka Vseteckova

Individuals with intellectual disability(ies) are living longer contributing to an overall increase in the average age of caregivers. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals with intellectual disability(ies) are living longer contributing to an overall increase in the average age of caregivers. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the physical, social and psychological needs of ageing carers of individuals with intellectual disability(ies) in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review framework was used to identify literature from eleven databases, the grey literature and the references lists of relevant studies. Only primary research studies that discussed the needs of non-professional carers, aged 65+ years old, of individuals with intellectual disability(ies) in the UK were included. No date restrictions were applied. Thematic analysis was used to narratively synthesise findings.

Findings

Six studies were included. Five key themes were identified: Living with fear, lack of information, rebuilding trust, proactive professional involvement and being ignored. Housing and support information is not communicated well to carers. Professionals require more training on carer needs and trust must be rebuilt between carers and professionals. Proactive approaches would help identify carer needs, reduce marginalisation, help carers feel heard and reduce the risk of care crisis. Greater recognition of mutual caring relationships is needed.

Originality/value

This review highlighted the needs of older caregivers for individuals with intellectual disability(ies) as well as the need for more high-quality research in this field. The information presented in this review may be considered by primary care providers and funding bodies when planning future support for this growing population of carers.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Heidi Emery, Bridget Jones and Eddie Chaplin

This paper describes an ongoing process of engagement with carers of people with intellectual disabilities currently being monitored by an out of area service for both…

Downloads
185

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes an ongoing process of engagement with carers of people with intellectual disabilities currently being monitored by an out of area service for both carers of people placed both in area and out of area within a local Mental Health Learning Disabilities team in South London.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a series of consultation events, carers were asked to participate in a free dialogue which focussed on everyday issues for carers. This included financial implications of caring, knowledge of care pathways/systems in care, carer's needs and expectations and the support they currently receive.

Findings

This paper highlighted a number of issues and concerns that carers face in their daily lives when supporting one or more people. These include lack of recognition, financial difficulties, lack of training and support.

Originality/value

This project offered a valuable insight into current carer perceptions and will help develop further discussion and promote greater engagement by services and mutual understanding with this often neglected group.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 101000