Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Debra D. Bragg

President Obama positions community colleges as a linchpin of federal policy on education and training for citizens adversely affected by the recession. Chief among…

Abstract

Purpose

President Obama positions community colleges as a linchpin of federal policy on education and training for citizens adversely affected by the recession. Chief among recommended reforms is the notion of career pathways that enable students, especially non-traditional age adults, to participate in postsecondary education directed at employment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the literature on career pathway reforms to describe these programs and the students who enroll in them. It also presents evidence from two third-party evaluations of federal grants supporting career pathway implementation.

Findings

Results suggest career pathway programs are spreading throughout the United States through unprecedented levels of federal funding. Adult learners are a primary target group, but more data are needed to determine on a deeper level who these students are and whether they are being well served.

Originality/value

This paper offers new information to help readers consider whether President Obama’s agenda will achieve its goals and positively impact college completion and economic recovery.

Details

The Obama Administration and Educational Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-709-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Patricia A McManus

This research compares the effects of career credentials and family factors on self-employment careers in the United States and Western Germany. In Germany, both general…

Abstract

This research compares the effects of career credentials and family factors on self-employment careers in the United States and Western Germany. In Germany, both general education and vocational credentials structure self-employment, primarily at entry. In the United States, general education alone structures self-employment, primarily by stabilizing the self-employment careers of workers with higher credentials. Intergenerational transmission of self-employment is more prominent among men, while spousal transmission of self-employment status is more prominent among women. In the United States, but not in Germany, there is evidence of a “caretaker” pathway that brings mothers of young children into self-employment for short periods of time.

Details

Inequality Across Societies: Familes, Schools and Persisting Stratification
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-061-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Caroline R. Pitt, Adam Bell, Rose Strickman and Katie Davis

This paper aims to investigate the potential for digital badges to support alternate learning and career pathways in formal and informal learning environments. Stakeholder…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential for digital badges to support alternate learning and career pathways in formal and informal learning environments. Stakeholder groups in higher education and industry discussed how digital badges might transform current processes of admitting undergraduate students and hiring young professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a thematic analysis of in-depth interviews with 30 stakeholders in higher education and the technology industry.

Findings

Interview participants expressed optimism about the potential for digital badges to make learning pathways visible to learners and external audiences and to promote equity in STEM (STEM: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education and careers. Participants noted several obstacles, largely focused on issues of credibility and logistics of working with badges across settings.

Research limitations/implications

Though the research approach is limited in geographic scope, the findings have broad applicability and insight for the use of digital badges in general.

Practical implications

Education policymakers, employers and scholars will be able to use the insights from this investigation in their efforts to find innovative ways to expand and diversify the STEM workforce, as well as support a wider range of learners than is currently supported by initiatives aligned with the school-to-workforce pipeline metaphor.

Originality/value

This paper directly confronts issues of real-world applications of digital badges by discussing practical implications with college admissions officers and employers. The current study fills a need for research that investigates the use of digital badges across – as opposed to within – contexts.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Karin Schittenhelm

Education and employment are important elements of successful integration for immigrants in a host country. In Germany, young immigrants and members of the second…

Abstract

Education and employment are important elements of successful integration for immigrants in a host country. In Germany, young immigrants and members of the second immigrant generation have only limited access to higher education pathways and academic careers. Their trajectories are shaped mainly by the vocational training system, if they obtain any qualifications at all. Social risks for young people with immigrant backgrounds, and women in particular, such as being unemployed or having unstable careers, have frequently been pointed out by researchers, but little has been said about more qualified pathways available through privileged apprenticeships or academic qualifications. This article explores the social risks in trajectories of female immigrants following middle‐range or higher educational pathways in Germany. The cases discussed focus on young women who arrived in Germany during childhood or adolescence. The paper will first discuss the institutional settings of the German education system, focusing on their impact on pupils with immigrant backgrounds and how they overlap with existing gender inequalities in the recipient country. Discussion of the particular methodological approach will follow, before presentation of the findings of the case studies on female immigrants' transitions from education to work. The concluding discussion considers potential means to support participation in education and work for young women with immigrant backgrounds.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

A majority of human resource executives report that their inability to attract and retain middle-skills talent frequently affects their firm’s performance. Middle-skills…

Abstract

A majority of human resource executives report that their inability to attract and retain middle-skills talent frequently affects their firm’s performance. Middle-skills jobs, those that require more than a high school diploma, less than a four-year college degree, and pay above the national living wage, account for nearly half of labor demanded in the United States. As technology transforms the workplace, digital skills are becoming increasingly important and in higher demand. In today’s dynamic workforce, managers are facing managing and developing interdisciplinary and multilevel teams while combating a technical skills divide (lack of qualified workers), making it difficult to recruit and retain a high-technology, middle-skill-level workforce. This chapter focuses on addressing unique challenges relevant to recruitment, upskilling, and management best practices as they relate to the integration of technology and middle-skill-level workers in a highly successful workplace.

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Robyn Broadbent, Marcelle Cacciattolo and Theo Papadopoulos

Career programmes within secondary school curriculum can impact on a young person's sense of direction and meaning in life. The purpose of this paper is to report on an…

Abstract

Purpose

Career programmes within secondary school curriculum can impact on a young person's sense of direction and meaning in life. The purpose of this paper is to report on an evaluation that was conducted in 2009 of the careers programmes in one secondary college in the western suburbs of Melbourne.

Design/methodology/approach

The research team utilised a multi‐method approach collecting 273 surveys and undertaking both focus groups and interviews, ensuring the voices of young people were at the centre of the work.

Findings

Innovative careers and transition programmes create opportunities for young people to plan for their future. Similarly the absence of established careers programmes can compound the disadvantage that some students experience. The findings evidence how important it is for schools to support inclusive classrooms that enable young people to make informed decisions about their career pathways.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings were used to form a model of good practice and highlight the transformational impact of career and transition programmes for young people. The current research explores student knowledge, confidence, attitudes and perceptions while they are still at school. A longitudinal study, tracking these same young people as they progress to tertiary education and/or employment, would enable more definitive evidence on actual transitions and the actual outcomes experienced by young people.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to the education sector as it looks to respond to the need to develop a more seamless approach to young people making successful transitions to further education and/or employment.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 54 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Janice H. Rippon

To introduce the concept of diverse career cultures in the education system and to consider how these impact on individual career investment and attempts to modernise the…

Abstract

Purpose

To introduce the concept of diverse career cultures in the education system and to consider how these impact on individual career investment and attempts to modernise the teaching profession internationally.

Design/methodology/approach

A life history approach was used to determine the career environment of teachers, setting career theories and career policy against the lived experiences of a group of educationalists. The interaction of the structural, cultural and individual dimensions of career has been analysed using grounded theory to determine the emerging cultural themes.

Findings

Two distinct career cultures have emerged over time influencing how teachers perceive their work. Each career culture determines the career investment pattern of individuals regardless of the structural career promoted. For most teachers, a secure career culture is the dominant influence on career decision‐making despite the existence of a subordinate investment culture, more common to careers outside the education field.

Research limitations/implications

The concept of career culture should be explored with larger groups of teachers internationally and compared against other major occupational groups.

Practical implications

An investment career culture should be encouraged by re‐defining the modern career, the motivations of its members and the career sites open to them to promote diverse models of career investment.

Originality/value

This paper challenges the assumptions in current education policy that current structural changes will modernise the teaching career by looking at the subjective dimension of careers with potential recruits, existing educationalists and policy‐makers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Crystle Martin

This paper demonstrates the impact of recognition and valuation of youth interest on potential career trajectory and future pathway choices.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper demonstrates the impact of recognition and valuation of youth interest on potential career trajectory and future pathway choices.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents data from two ethnographies. The first ethnography is of an online professional wrestling fan community, which took place between October 2012 and May 2013. The second ethnography is of the online Scratch community, Scratch is a free online coding program. Observations of the community took place between October 2014 and October 2015, with interviews ongoing as of the writing of this paper.

Findings

This paper details the importance of valuing youth learning and the impact that receiving recognition and valuation can have on youths’ future choices.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses on two online communities and presents four examples of the phenomena of valuation and recognition described in the paper. To draw broad conclusions, a wider sample would be required.

Practical implications

This paper can offer examples to practitioners and researcher alike as to what the impacts of valuing youth learning in interest-driven contexts can be for youth long-term learning and career trajectory and forms that the valuation of interest to support growth and interest can take.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the importance of valuing learning in all parts of youths’ lives and the impact that the valuation can have on the future pathways and career trajectory of youth.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Daniel B. Cornfield, Jonathan S. Coley, Larry W. Isaac and Dennis C. Dickerson

As a site of contestation among job seekers, workers, and managers, the bureaucratic workplace both reproduces and erodes occupational race segregation and racial status…

Abstract

As a site of contestation among job seekers, workers, and managers, the bureaucratic workplace both reproduces and erodes occupational race segregation and racial status hierarchies. Much sociological research has examined the reproduction of racial inequality at work; however, little research has examined how desegregationist forces, including civil rights movement values, enter and permeate bureaucratic workplaces into the broader polity. Our purpose in this chapter is to introduce and typologize what we refer to as “occupational activism,” defined as socially transformative individual and collective action that is conducted and realized through an occupational role or occupational community. We empirically induce and present a typology from our study of the half-century-long, post-mobilization occupational careers of over 60 veterans of the nonviolent Nashville civil rights movement of the early 1960s. The fourfold typology of occupational activism is framed in the “new” sociology of work, which emphasizes the role of worker agency and activism in determining worker life chances, and in the “varieties of activism” perspective, which treats the typology as a coherent regime of activist roles in the dialogical diffusion of civil rights movement values into, within, and out of workplaces. We conclude with a research agenda on how bureaucratic workplaces nurture and stymie occupational activism as a racially desegregationist force at work and in the broader polity.

Details

Race, Identity and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-501-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Christine Naschberger and Krista Finstad-Milion

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how French managers picture their careers, specifically female careers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how French managers picture their careers, specifically female careers.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample was composed of 93 women and 5 men attending a professional women’s networking event in France. Participants answered a questionnaire, including images to choose from to best describe how they perceived their own career development.

Findings

The results indicate that a female career is closely associated with work-life balance by both women and men. Also, women acknowledge three times more than men, the existence of a glass ceiling in their organisation. Women and men choose both traditional and contemporary images of career.

Research limitations/implications

As the sample was taken from a women’s network event, the male sample size is small. Despite the small sample of men, giving voice to male participants leads to rich insights which challenge gendered and non-gendered career models.

Practical implications

On an individual level, reflection on one’s career path fosters awareness and ownership of career choices. Further, working with career images enhances discussion and experience sharing about personal career choices, and offers opportunities to organisations concerned with developing female talent.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the career literature by providing insights into how female and male managers perceive female careers. The study’s originality lies in the methodology, based on using images of careers to better understand how managers picture their own careers.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000