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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Shuang Ren and Doren Chadee

The widespread use of communication technologies and social media platforms such as the #ME TOO movement has amplified the importance for business leaders to demonstrate…

Abstract

Purpose

The widespread use of communication technologies and social media platforms such as the #ME TOO movement has amplified the importance for business leaders to demonstrate high standards of ethical behavior for career success. Although the concept of ethical leadership has been widely investigated, a theoretical framework from a career perspective does not yet exist.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws from sensemaking theory to argue that career identity salience shapes leaders' communication behavior to influence the extent to which they are perceived to be ethical by subordinates. We test our hypotheses using multisource data with a sample (n = 337) of business managers.

Findings

The results show that career identity salience has positive influence on communication competence, which positively influences ethical leadership. We further find that communication frequency positively moderates the relationship between communication competence and ethical leadership.

Practical implications

The theoretical and practical implications that, motivated by their career identity, career-ambitious leaders can manipulate subordinates' perceptions of their ethical behavior are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

Originality/value

To our knowledge, this is the first research to provide a career perspective on ethical leadership.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Rowena Ortiz‐Walters, Kimberly‐Ann Eddleston and Kathleen Simione

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of gender identity on protégés' satisfaction with mentoring relationships. More specifically, it aims to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of gender identity on protégés' satisfaction with mentoring relationships. More specifically, it aims to investigate whether or not a protégé's feminine or masculine identity, by virtue of emphasizing different criteria, roles, and preferences, impacts his or her satisfaction with the performance of a mentor.

Design/methodology/approach

Managers and/or professionals, identified by in‐career MBA students at large universities in the East, completed surveys to assess relationship satisfaction as a mentoring outcome.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that masculine protégés, who strongly identify with their career roles, report being more satisfied with mentors who provide career development support. Conversely, feminine protégés, who measure career success using socio‐emotional‐based criteria, report being more satisfied with mentors who provide psychosocial support.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited in its generalizability due to the type of sample studied. The sample consisted of managers from a variety of male‐dominated occupations. In addition, since the data were self‐reported on a single survey, common method bias may also be an issue.

Practical implications

Despite limitations, the study implies that assessment of gender identity and related skills can provide organizations with more effective guidance and matching of mentors and protégés to maximize perceived satisfaction on the part of the protégé.

Originality/value

Although many studies have investigated a variety of factors that affect mentoring, few have examined the influence of gender identity on the functioning of these relationships.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Huimin Liu and Hang-yue Ngo

The purpose of this study is to examine how gender role orientation (i.e. masculinity and femininity) and career/family role salience affect individuals’ organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how gender role orientation (i.e. masculinity and femininity) and career/family role salience affect individuals’ organizational identification (OID) and intention to leave. Alternative models were developed to specify different relationships among the study variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a questionnaire survey of 362 employees from three large companies in China. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate alternative models and test the hypotheses.

Findings

This paper found that masculinity was positively related to career role salience, whereas femininity was positively related to family role salience. Career role salience, but not family role salience, was positively related to OID, which in turn was negatively related to intention to leave. A positive relationship was also found between femininity and OID, as well as between family role salience and intention to leave.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the data of this study precludes any definitive inferences about causality and directionality. The use of self-report measures also invites the potential threat of common method variance. The generalizability of results has been restricted, given that the respondents were drawn from three large companies.

Practical implications

Organizations may provide more resources and support for their employees so as to increase their career role salience, which in turn enhances their level of OID. For employees who are high in femininity, employers may offer family-friendly programs to help them address resource drain from family to work, and hence to retain them.

Originality/value

This study provided evidence for the linkage between gender role orientation with career/family role salience. It also revealed the impacts of career/family role salience on OID and intention to leave. Some gender differences in this regard were highlighted.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Elizabeth Hamilton Volpe and Wendy Marcinkus Murphy

The purpose of this paper is to address the idea of “opting out” for married professional women by presenting a conceptual investigation into the impact that a woman's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the idea of “opting out” for married professional women by presenting a conceptual investigation into the impact that a woman's identity and social networks have in shaping her decisions surrounding career exit. A model is developed and intended to help researchers in this area move beyond existing frameworks when attempting to explain and predict women's career exit.

Design/methodology/approach

Research from the identity, social networks, turnover, and careers literatures was analyzed and integrated to put forth a new theoretical lens, represented by the conceptual model developed in this paper, that helps to explain married professional women's career exit.

Findings

Development of the model reveals a complex, reciprocal relationship between a woman's identity and her social network and depicts how these factors act in concert to shape women's decisions regarding career exit or “opting out.” This model also highlights the importance of structural constraints shaping a woman's social network, moderators impacting the relationship between a woman's identity and career exit behaviors, and outcomes of career exit.

Originality/value

Although identity is a fundamental element of career development and relationships with others serve as an origin of self and source of self‐understanding, the integration of these perspectives has been conspicuously absent from research on women's career exit. Examining the convergence of identity and social networks and the reciprocal relationship these constructs have on career phenomena advances our knowledge of why married professional women choose to “opt out” or exit their careers.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Chang-qin Lu, Jing-Jing Lu, Dan-yang Du and Paula Brough

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the crossover effects of one partner’s work-family conflict (WFC) on the other partner’s family satisfaction, physical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the crossover effects of one partner’s work-family conflict (WFC) on the other partner’s family satisfaction, physical well-being, and mental well-being. The study tests the moderating effect of the opposite partner’s family identity salience within the crossover process in a Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect matched data from 212 Chinese dual-earner couples. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was employed to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that there were significantly negative crossover effects of husbands’ WFC on their wives’ family satisfaction, physical well-being, and mental well-being, and vice versa. The authors found that the wives’ family identity salience mitigated the crossover effects of the husbands’ WFC, but the husbands’ family identity did not moderate the crossover effect of the wives’ WFC.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the crossover effects of WFC among dual-earner couples in China. Further, the study integrated family identity salience into the WFC crossover process between couples from the receiver’s view and provided evidence that partners differed in the ways they dealt with each other’s stress. This research advances scholarly discussions of the psychological crossover process and fills a key gap of considering complex role variables as moderators within this crossover process.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Bernard McKenna, Martie-Louise Verreynne and Neal Waddell

Unequal workplace gender outcomes continue to motivate research. Using the prism of work-life-(im)balance, the purpose of this paper is to show how identity salience and…

Abstract

Purpose

Unequal workplace gender outcomes continue to motivate research. Using the prism of work-life-(im)balance, the purpose of this paper is to show how identity salience and motivation contribute to a subject position that for many reproduces socially gendered practices of workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

After initial inductive computer-assisted text analysis, the authors innovatively move to deductively analyse data from focus group and semi-structured interviews of 18 female and 19 male Australian managers in the financial and government sectors.

Findings

The authors find that a gendered sense of reflexivity is virtually non-existent among the female Australian managers and professionals interviewed in this research. The inductive stage of critical discourse analysis revealed a substantial difference between men and women in two concepts, responsibility, and choice. These form the axes of the typological model to better explain how non-reflexive gendered workplace practices are “performed”.

Practical implications

This empirical research provides a foundation for understanding the role of choice and responsibility in work-home patterns for women.

Social implications

The absence of a reflexive gender-based understanding of women’s work-home choice is explained in Bourdieusian terms.

Originality/value

By not specifically using a gender lens, the authors have avoided the stereotypical understanding of gendered workplaces.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Raymond Nam Cam Trau and Charmine E.J. Härtel

Most of the research on career development of sexual minorities focuses on lesbians. Gay men, on the other hand, have received little attention in the literature as it is…

Abstract

Most of the research on career development of sexual minorities focuses on lesbians. Gay men, on the other hand, have received little attention in the literature as it is assumed that they face fewer difficulties in career development because they are men. This paper redresses this gap by presenting an analysis of the impact of sexual identity on the career development of gay men, drawing on both a literature review of the literature on sexual identity, gay organizational studies and career development and the results of a recent interview study. In accord with other literature, the study demonstrates that gay men, like other sexual minorities, are confronted with a conflict between personal and career needs, and have to deal with society's expectations and intolerance towards homosexuality. Suggestions are given for research that will lead to a deeper understanding of the career decisions and attitudes of gay men.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Mary A. Gowan

This paper aims to investigate changes in psychological well‐being over time for individuals who experienced a career disruption in the form of a company closing, and to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate changes in psychological well‐being over time for individuals who experienced a career disruption in the form of a company closing, and to examine the relationships between employability, well‐being, and job satisfaction. It seeks to expand on previous work of job loss relative to the long‐term impact of the experience and on Fugate et al.'s psycho‐social conceptualization of employability.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected at the time of job loss (T1) and six years later (T2). The 73 respondents at T2 represent a stratified random sample of the T1 respondents. Hypotheses were tested with paired sample t‐tests and hierarchical multiple regression.

Findings

Results indicate that the negative psychological impact of job loss diminishes over time. Additionally, employability predicted well‐being and job satisfaction.

Practical implications

The results of the study provide guidance for the design and administration of outplacement and related programs that focus on increasing employability and psychological well‐being, and suggest ways that individuals can shield themselves from the negative consequences associated with a job loss.

Social implications

The results have policy implications for the design of government funded outplacement and retraining programs.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to examine job loss over a six‐year period of time, and the first to examine the impact of employability attributes on multiple indicators of well‐being and on job satisfaction in the job loss context.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2017

Jeanette N. Cleveland, Lena-Alyeska Huebner and Madison E. Hanscom

Aging workers are a diverse group yet research on aging infrequently examines the joint effects of age and gender upon various life domains and decisions. In order to…

Abstract

Aging workers are a diverse group yet research on aging infrequently examines the joint effects of age and gender upon various life domains and decisions. In order to fully understand the experience of a person, you must examine her/his roles and identities as they intersect. Intersectionality extends to the work setting, and the notion of intersectionality is presented as a paradigm that can yield significant insights into the joint consideration of age and gender in the workplace. These relationships have the potential to shape identities, which may in turn influence work perceptions and outcomes. As a result there are important considerations, consequences, solutions, and future research topics, as well as Human Resource practices that are discussed in this chapter.

Details

Age Diversity in the Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-073-0

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2005

Naomi Ellemers and Floor Rink

This chapter reviews recent theoretical developments and empirical research, to examine the causes and consequences of identity processes in relation to collaboration in…

Abstract

This chapter reviews recent theoretical developments and empirical research, to examine the causes and consequences of identity processes in relation to collaboration in work groups and group performance. Our central proposition is that identification in work groups can have beneficial as well as detrimental effects, depending on the nature of the shared identity, and the content of distinctive group norms. First, we examine some of the complications stemming from the fact that identification in work settings typically involves groups that can be defined at different levels of inclusiveness and where people can be seen as having multiple cross-cutting identities. Then, we move on to show that processes of identification affect the way people view their co-workers and supervisors, causing the same objective behavior to be interpreted and responded to in a fundamentally different way. Finally, we examine how normative expectations about prototypical group behavior determine group processes and group outcomes, with the consequence that identification and commitment can affect work motivation and collective performance in different ways, depending on the content of distinctive group norms.

Details

Social Identification in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-223-8

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