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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Rohit Gumber, John Devapriam, David Sallah and Sayeed Khan

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the current competencies and training needs for being an expert witness of trainees (CT3, ST4-6) and career grade psychiatrists

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the current competencies and training needs for being an expert witness of trainees (CT3, ST4-6) and career grade psychiatrists (consultants and staff grade, associate specialist and specialty doctors) in a UK health and well-being Trust.

Design/methodology/approach

This was completed through an online survey, developed by the authors, of all career grade and trainee psychiatrists within the Trust.

Findings

Only 9 per cent of respondents reported that they felt they had adequate training to feel competent as an expert witness. Despite low levels of training and confidence, 73 per cent of respondents had written an expert report. As well as shortage of training opportunities for psychiatrics acting as expert witnesses, the findings indicated increasing fear of litigation and lack of direct experience of court proceedings during training.

Practical implications

Doctors need to be offered formal training opportunities including simulated training, ideally organised within Trust, Continuing Professional Development (CPD) committees or Education committees. Implementation of the RCPsych report guidance into speciality curricula and CPD opportunities for doctors would ensure a robust curriculum-based delivery of these essential skills.

Originality/value

A wealth of guidance is available for expert witnesses, but no previous study had identified the specific training issues and overall confidence in competency to act as an expert witness amongst psychiatrists. It will be valuable to all psychiatrists involved in court work and organisations involved in training psychiatrists, especially in light of recent relevant court cases and removal of expert witness immunity.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Carol Ireland and Neil Gredecki

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Thomas Flamini, Natasha R. Matthews, George S. Castle and Elliot M. Jones-Williams

The purpose of this paper is to investigate perceptions towards a career in psychiatry among medical students and psychiatrists and identify how recruitment into the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate perceptions towards a career in psychiatry among medical students and psychiatrists and identify how recruitment into the specialty may be improved.

Design/methodology/approach

This study locally compares medical student and psychiatric doctor responses to a structured online survey and structured interviews with key managerial figures in the Humber NHS Foundation Trust.

Findings

Comparison across two main areas (pre-decision exposure to psychiatry and reasons for considering a psychiatric career) found that both students and doctors were influenced to make a choice about a career in psychiatry during medical school. Medical students found compatibility with family life to be more important when considering psychiatry, whereas doctors cited content-based reasons as significant pull factors. Stigma and fear of being harmed deterred some students from choosing a career in psychiatry. Structured interview responses reiterated the importance of pre-medical school and undergraduate mentorship in bolstering future recruitment to psychiatry.

Practical implications

Medical students perceive certain career issues differently to their postgraduate counterparts. Widening the content-based appeal of psychiatry and optimising the medical school experience of the specialty via varied and high-quality placements may be a key step towards tackling the national shortfall in qualified psychiatrists.

Originality/value

This is the first published study comparing medical student and psychiatric doctor perceptions of a career in psychiatry.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Hany George El-Sayeh, Elizabeth Cashman, Rozita Zenhari, Sarah Jones, Claire Pocklington, Godfrey Pell and Simon Budd

Psychiatric recruitment and retention are at an unprecedented low within the UK. The reasons for this shortfall may include public and professional stigma, recent NHS…

Abstract

Purpose

Psychiatric recruitment and retention are at an unprecedented low within the UK. The reasons for this shortfall may include public and professional stigma, recent NHS service developments and changes in undergraduate training. The purpose of this study is to explore medical student’s perceptions of the nature and magnitude of these factors on influencing whether or not they would choose a career in psychiatry.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study was conducted with year four medical students at a single UK University with low levels of recruitment into psychiatry. Two focus groups were asked about their undergraduate experience within the speciality. Thematic analysis of the resulting transcripts enabled the identification of codes and over-arching themes, which formed the focus of this study.

Findings

Four key themes were identified during analysis and these included: the core subject matter (of psychiatry) viewed as being different; curriculum or course variables; interpersonal factors and; career factors. Placement enjoyment, positive role-modelling and enthusiasm were all important when considering psychiatry as a career. Therapeutic success, career flexibility and pay-banding were also powerful determinants.

Practical implications

These findings led to the initiation of an apprentice programme for undergraduates on psychiatric placement, designed to enhance the student experience of psychiatry and the perception of the speciality as a career.

Originality/value

While there are a number of possible solutions to current adverse national trends in psychiatric recruitment, increasing efforts to increase both the variety and quality of undergraduate placements and establishing a clearer sense of team identity is of vital importance if these patterns are to be reversed.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2018

Daniel B. Cornfield, Jonathan S. Coley, Larry W. Isaac and Dennis C. Dickerson

As a site of contestation among job seekers, workers, and managers, the bureaucratic workplace both reproduces and erodes occupational race segregation and racial status…

Abstract

As a site of contestation among job seekers, workers, and managers, the bureaucratic workplace both reproduces and erodes occupational race segregation and racial status hierarchies. Much sociological research has examined the reproduction of racial inequality at work; however, little research has examined how desegregationist forces, including civil rights movement values, enter and permeate bureaucratic workplaces into the broader polity. Our purpose in this chapter is to introduce and typologize what we refer to as “occupational activism,” defined as socially transformative individual and collective action that is conducted and realized through an occupational role or occupational community. We empirically induce and present a typology from our study of the half-century-long, post-mobilization occupational careers of over 60 veterans of the nonviolent Nashville civil rights movement of the early 1960s. The fourfold typology of occupational activism is framed in the “new” sociology of work, which emphasizes the role of worker agency and activism in determining worker life chances, and in the “varieties of activism” perspective, which treats the typology as a coherent regime of activist roles in the dialogical diffusion of civil rights movement values into, within, and out of workplaces. We conclude with a research agenda on how bureaucratic workplaces nurture and stymie occupational activism as a racially desegregationist force at work and in the broader polity.

Details

Race, Identity and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-501-6

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mad Muse: The Mental Illness Memoir in a Writer's Life and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-810-0

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Geraldine Lines, Jodie Allen and Caryl Jane Marshall

People with intellectual disability (ID) experience significant health and social inequality compared to their non-disabled peers. Individuals with ID who access mental…

Abstract

Purpose

People with intellectual disability (ID) experience significant health and social inequality compared to their non-disabled peers. Individuals with ID who access mental health services can have complex comorbidities and presentations. In the UK, a significant proportion of individuals with ID are supported within general adult mental health services not by specialist ID teams. The purpose of this study is to explore whether psychiatry trainees in the Maudsley Training Programme (MTP) feel adequately skilled to support individuals with ID.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of trainee psychiatrists in the MTP was completed to evaluate self-perceived skills and knowledge in the care of individuals with ID in mental health services. Statistical analysis of the results was completed.

Findings

Experience of working in specialist ID teams is positively associated with greater confidence and skills among trainees in the care of people with ID; this is beyond what would be expected based on seniority alone.

Research limitations/implications

The response rate was 16.7 per cent; a larger sample size would add strength to the study. Like all online surveys, there exists the risk of selection bias.

Practical implications

UK Policy states that people with ID should be supported to access mainstream services where possible, including psychiatric care. Practical experience for all psychiatry trainees involving specialist ID services and people with ID could improve the care given to that particularly disadvantaged group.

Originality/value

This is the only paper known to the authors that has focused specifically on the skills and knowledge of psychiatry trainees in the UK with regards to ID.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Melissa Willis, Lynette C.M. Low, Sagir Parkar and David Curtis

To determine the extent to which psychiatrists of different grades complied with published recommendations regarding referral for psychological treatment of patients…

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Abstract

Purpose

To determine the extent to which psychiatrists of different grades complied with published recommendations regarding referral for psychological treatment of patients suffering from depression.

Design/methodology/approach

Clinic letters regarding patients with depression were audited to see whether patients were referred for psychological treatment and, if not, whether a reason was recorded. The results were presented and the audit repeated.

Findings

There was little difference in the results of the two audits. Overall, 51 per cent of depressed patients were referred for psychological treatment and 26 per cent were not referred without a reason being given. SHOs were significantly (p=0.008) more likely than other grades not to refer without giving a reason.

Practical implications

SHOs should be encouraged to consider psychological treatment for depression and to record their reasons when not making a referral for this.

Originality/value

This audit has identified a probable reluctance of SHOs to consider referral for psychological treatment and hence suggests that this issue should be specifically addressed as a supervision and training issue.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Joanne Pransky

The following article is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot Journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The following article is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot Journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal experience of a prominent, robotic industry PhD and innovator regarding his pioneering efforts. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The interviewee is Dr Nabil Simaan, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science and Otolaryngology at Vanderbilt University. He is also director of Vanderbilt’s Advanced Robotics and Mechanism Applications Research Laboratory. In this interview, Simaan shares his unique perspective and approaches on his journey of trying to solve real-world problems in the medical robotics area.

Findings

Simaan received his BSc, MSc and PhD in mechanical engineering from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. He served as Postdoctoral Research Scientist in Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University. In 2005, he joined Columbia University, New York, NY, as an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering until 2010, when he joined Vanderbilt. His current applied research interests include synthesis of novel robotic systems for surgical assistance in confined spaces with applications to minimally invasive surgery of the throat, natural orifice surgery, cochlear implant surgery and dexterous bimanual microsurgery. Theoretical aspects of his research include robot design and kinematics.

Originality/value

Dr Simaan is a leading pioneer on designing robotic systems and mechanisms for medical applications. Examples include technologies for snake robots licensed to Intuitive Surgical; technologies for micro-surgery of the retina, which led to the formation of AURIS Surgical Robotics; the insertable robotic effector platform (IREP) single-port surgery robot that served as the research prototype behind the Titan Medical Inc. Sport (Single Port Orifice Robotic Technology). Simaan received the NSF Career award for young investigators to design new algorithms and robots for safe interaction with the anatomy. He has served as the Editor for IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Robotics, Editorial Board Member of Robotica, Area Chair for Robotics Science and Systems and corresponding Co-chair for the IEEE Technical Committee on Surgical Robotics. In January 2020, he was bestowed the award of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Fellow for Robotics Advancements. At the end of 2020, he was named a top voice in health-care robotics by technology discovery platform InsightMonk and market intelligence firm BIS Research. Simaan holds 15 patents. A producer of human capital, his education goal is to achieve the best possible outcome with every student he works with.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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