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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2020

Divyang Purohit, Mitesh Jayswal and Ashutosh Muduli

The purpose of this paper, systematic literature review, is twofold: to identify the factors influencing graduate job choice and to propose a theoretical model that can be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, systematic literature review, is twofold: to identify the factors influencing graduate job choice and to propose a theoretical model that can be useful for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis of the literature available till June 2020 has been reviewed using electronic databases such as ABI/INFORM Complete, EBSCO, Emerald Insight, ProQuest, SAGE Journals, Science Direct (Elsevier), Scopus, Springer Link, Taylor and Francis Online, Wiley Online Library.

Findings

Out of more than 5,000 studies, 14 studies were found addressing the issue of career choice among graduating students. The thematic analysis result explored five themes such as internal factors, external factors, interpersonal factors, institutional factors and socio-demographic factors that can be considered critical for graduates’ career choice decision. Details of the subthemes are also identified.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for practitioners have been suggested from the internal factors, external factors, interpersonal factors, institutional factors and socio-demographic factors’ perspectives. The study result can be useful for conducting future research using quantitative data on graduate job choice.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to present a comprehensive picture of past studies on graduate job choice and exploring the factors influencing graduate job choice.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Godfred M.Y. Owusu, Anthony Essel-Anderson, Teddy Ossei Kwakye, Rita Amoah Bekoe and Charles Gyamfi Ofori

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that influence Ghanaian tertiary students’ career choices. The paper explores the dimensionality of the career

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1166

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that influence Ghanaian tertiary students’ career choices. The paper explores the dimensionality of the career choice factors within the Ghanaian context and also ascertains their degree of influence on students’ career choices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs survey method of research and a set of questionnaire was used to examine the factors that influence students’ career choices. A total of 354 undergraduate students from the Ashesi University College in Ghana participated in the study. Factor analysis was conducted on the career choice factors and differences in response between science and business students were ascertained by means of independent sample t-test.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that university students in Ghana place much premium on intrinsic value and employability/financial prospect in their career choice decisions than such factors as prestige and desired working conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study are relevant for policymakers and tertiary education providers interested in making the study of science an attractive option for university students in Ghana.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper highlight some of the underlining reasons for the unpopularity of the study of sciences among university students in Ghana.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Liza Howe-Walsh, Sarah Turnbull, Saleena Khan and Vijay Pereira

The study aims to explore the factors that influence Emirati women's career choice in the UAE. This study contributes to the influence of context in career choices by…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore the factors that influence Emirati women's career choice in the UAE. This study contributes to the influence of context in career choices by investigating how Emirati women chose information technology (IT) as a profession through the lens of the social cognitive career theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This study undertook in-depth interviews with 21 Emirati women working in technology in the UAE. The study considers women's career choices at three levels, i.e. from an individual, organisational and national context perspective.

Findings

The key findings include identifying the importance of national context in influencing career choices among other factors such as family centrality, desire to be seen as a role model, company reputation and government policy.

Practical implications

The study has wider implications for women's career choices in other contexts. The findings highlight the challenges women face, such as a lack of role models and family centrality, which need to be considered in recruitment policies and practices in other national contexts.

Originality/value

The originality of the study is its contribution to the literature developing understanding of the influences on women's career choices in the Emirates. While previous studies have identified the role of patriarchal influence on women's careers, we have less understanding of the importance attributed to individual factors such as being perceived as a role model within their family and to society. Similarly, the literature provides limited evidence of the influence of factors such as government sponsorship and company reputation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Samuel O. Salami

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of family, individual difference and cultural factors on the choice of gender‐dominated occupations among female…

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3341

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of family, individual difference and cultural factors on the choice of gender‐dominated occupations among female students in some tertiary institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A field‐based survey approach was adopted to collect quantitative data through the means of questionnaires from 340 female students randomly selected from tertiary institutions in Southwest Nigeria.

Findings

Hierarchical multiple‐regression statistical analysis employed revealed that family, individual differences and cultural factors were good predictors (collectively and independently) of choice of gender‐dominated occupations of female students.

Research limitations/implications

These findings were limited to nursing and engineering professions as well as variables investigated. Thus, future researchers should make efforts to extend the study's scope to other professions that could be categorized as gender‐dominated occupations.

Originality/value

The findings provide evidence on the factors influencing the choice of gender‐dominated occupations among female students. Hence, attention should be paid to the predicting variables investigated in that they provided significant basis for this study. These predicting variables could assist the female students in making realistic and purposeful career choices, so that they could overcome the barriers of occupational stereotyping in Nigerian society. This would enable the women to contribute their quota to their families and society in general.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2011

Cilliers van Zyl and Charl de Villiers

South Africa, like many countries in the rest of the world, is currently facing a shortage of chartered accountants (CAs). The purpose of this paper is to examine the…

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1985

Abstract

Purpose

South Africa, like many countries in the rest of the world, is currently facing a shortage of chartered accountants (CAs). The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors influencing the career choice of accounting students in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was used to assist professional institutes of CAs, universities, audit practitioners and other interested parties to understand the factors that influence students' career choices. The respondents were first‐year business students at a leading South African university.

Findings

The results indicate that CA students' choice is driven mainly by job security, job satisfaction, aptitude for accounting and potential future earnings. Although a high percentage of non‐CA students have considered becoming a CA (61.6 per cent), they cite job satisfaction as one of the key reasons why they decided against a CA qualification. The two groups clearly have different views on job satisfaction. Another important reason the non‐CA group mentioned against CA studies, was the strenuous nature of this field, including the technical difficulty of the subjects and the lengthy period of study required. Significant differences between the CA and non‐CA group were evident when the means of the ratings of career choice factors were compared. All mean scores, for each of the 12 career choice factors, were higher for CA stream students, compared with the non‐CA stream students. A possible reason is that CA students are more career oriented than their non‐CA student counterparts.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature. It investigates and rates the career choice factors influencing accounting students to become a CA and the factors that influence business students not to pursue CA studies. These results could potentially be used to develop a strategy to influence students' career choice of the CA profession in an effort to increase the number of CAs in South Africa.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Eddy S.W. Ng, Ronald J. Burke and Lisa Fiksenbaum

This research aims to explore the role of values, family, and non‐family influences on career choice in management among a sample of US MBA students.

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3629

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the role of values, family, and non‐family influences on career choice in management among a sample of US MBA students.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using self‐reported questionnaires from 109 students in a mid‐sized university located on the west coast of the USA. The respondents were in the first semester of their MBA program. Males and females were almost equally represented in the sample.

Findings

This study did not find people (family and non‐family) to be a predictor of career decisions. Instead, these decisions reflect the independent‐self among US students in the career choice and exploration process. In particular, the students placed a strong emphasis on self‐development (i.e. education). Most of the respondents aspired to careers, and not jobs or callings, reflecting a desire for career benefits and becoming wealthy. Men and women, with few exceptions, appear to have similar patterns in the factors affecting their career choice. Many of the factors found to have relationships with variables related to career choice in management also have strong cultural influences.

Practical implications

The predictor variables generally accounted for modest variance on most career outcomes, suggesting complexity of the career choice process. There were country differences in several predictor variables associated with a career choice in management. The US sample was different from other countries, suggesting the importance of national cultures and values in career choice and career expectations.

Originality/value

This study builds upon the factors previously reported to influence career choice in management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele

The purpose of this paper is to examine the career preferences of real estate students and the predisposing factors influencing the choice of career. The study also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the career preferences of real estate students and the predisposing factors influencing the choice of career. The study also analysed the gender and socioeconomic variations with respect to the career preferences and factors influencing the career choice of real estate students in an emergent market like Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Closed-ended questionnaires were administered on final year real estate students in the three Federal universities offering real estate in Southwestern Nigeria. Data were analysed using frequency counts, percentages, mean ranking, independent t-test, analysis of variance and correlation analysis.

Findings

The findings showed that the predominant individual factors influencing career choice of real estate students were personal career interest, the magnitude of initial salary, future financial prospects and job security. Furthermore, while intrinsic and economic/financial factors were the major themes influencing respondents’ career choice, the influence of a third party was less a likely determinant. Analysis of gender differences showed that there was a statistical difference between the male and female respondents with respect to the intrinsic and career exposure factors.

Research limitations/implications

The study has implications for real estate students, career advisers/academic counsellors, organisations employing the services of real estate graduates, and educational institutions and policy stakeholders in the real estate sector. The study also has implication for real estate professional bodies in Nigeria and other emergent markets.

Originality/value

This is perhaps the first attempt that examined the factors influencing the career choice of real estate students in an emergent market like Nigeria, especially from the perspectives of gender and socioeconomic variations.

Details

Property Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Eddy S.W. Ng, Charles W. Gossett, Samuel Chinyoka and Isaac Obasi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors that may be related to a career choice in the public vs the private sector in a developing African country.

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2872

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors that may be related to a career choice in the public vs the private sector in a developing African country.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of graduate management students, the authors tested reward preferences and altruism, elements of public service motivation, on their generalizability to a developing country in Africa. The authors also examine the role of career attitudes, individual personality factors, and cultural values on a career choice in public service.

Findings

The authors find that not all the factors associated with the choice of sector (public or private) found in previous studies apply in the Botswana context.

Research limitations/implications

Perry and Wise (1990) developed the concept of public service motivation to explain why individuals may be motivated to serve the public. However, two of the factors associated with public service, intrinsic motivation, and altruism, were not predictive of a career choice in the public sector in Botswana, and thus may limit its generalizability outside of western developed countries.

Practical implications

In Botswana and other developing economies, government jobs are considered to provide lucrative and stable employment, and attract educated citizens regardless of motivations. However, as the private-for-profit sector is emerging, these countries could soon be facing serious competition for top university students, and will need to develop a strategy for attracting the best talents to choose employment in the public sector over career options in the private sector.

Originality/value

The present study seeks to further the understanding on how individuals make a career choice between public vs private sector management in a developing country.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Simon Chak‐keung Wong and Gloria Jing Liu

This study aims to examine how the perceptions of hospitality and tourism management (HTM) undergraduates about their parental influences predict their career choice

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7312

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how the perceptions of hospitality and tourism management (HTM) undergraduates about their parental influences predict their career choice intention with regard to the hospitality and tourism (H&T) industry in China.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐administered questionnaire containing 22 parental influence attributes was given to both junior and senior students studying HTM programmes. Primary research on students' perceptions of parental influences on career choice has been undertaken in ten universities across five cities in China, with 566 valid samples acquired as a result.

Findings

Three out of six parental influential factors derived from 22 attributes are determined as being the salient predictors for students' H&T career choice intention. Those three factors are “perceived parental supports of the H&T industry”, “perceived parental career concerns about welfare and prestige”, and “perceived parental barriers to career choice”. Demographic differences in parental influential factors are also revealed in the study.

Research limitations/implications

The findings need to be confirmed by further evidence from other countries with different cultures. Future research should investigate students studying different majors, or at various educational levels. The variables of internship experience and colleges or universities being attended also deserve more attention. Another interesting topic would be to study parental influences on career choice from the parents' perspectives.

Originality/value

The knowledge obtained from the study will increase the very limited understanding of the effects of perceived parental influences on career choice, which might then lead to more attraction and recruitment of students to the H&T industry in China.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Monica Adya and Kate M. Kaiser

To develop a testable model for girls' career choices in technology fields based on past research and hypotheses about the future of the information technology (IT) workforce.

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5566

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a testable model for girls' career choices in technology fields based on past research and hypotheses about the future of the information technology (IT) workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

Review and assimilation of literature from education, psychology, sociology, computer science, IT, and business in a model that identifies factors that can potentially influence a girl's choice towards or against IT careers. The factors are categorized into social factors (family, peers, and media), structural factors (computer use, teacher/counselor influence, same sex versus coeducational schools), and individual differences. The impact of culture on these various factors is also explored.

Findings

The model indicates that parents, particularly fathers, are the key influencers of girls' choice of IT careers. Teachers and counselors provide little or no career direction. Hypotheses propose that early access to computers may reduce intimidation with technology and that same‐sex education may serve to reduce career bias against IT.

Research limitations/implications

While the model is multidisciplinary, much of research from which it draws is five to eight years old. Patterns of career choices, availability of technology, increased independence of women and girls, offshore/nearshore outsourcings of IT jobs are just some of the factors that may be insufficiently addressed in this study.

Practical implications

A “Recommendations” section provides some practical steps to increase the involvement of girls in IT‐related careers and activities at an early age. The article identifies cultural research as a limitation and ways to address this.

Originality/value

The paper is an assimilation of literature from diverse fields and provides a testable model for research on gender and IT.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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