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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Martin Jones, David Thompson, Chantal Ski, Robyn Clark, Richard Gray, Kari Vallury and Ferdous Alam

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of psychosocial treatments to support families living with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of psychosocial treatments to support families living with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression. The paper highlights that depression in people with CVD is a predictor of non-adherence to both medicines and cardiovascular rehabilitation programmes. The authors believe there is a clinical need to develop a programme of care to support the whole family to adhere to cardiovascular rehabilitation programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

A team of expert cardiovascular nurses, mental health nurses (MHN) and cardiologist clinical opinions and experiences. These opinions and experiences were supplemented by literature using MEDLINE as the primary database for papers published between December 2000 and December 2013.

Findings

People with CVD who become depressed are more likely to stop taking their medicine and stop working with their health care worker. Most people with heart and mood problems live with their families. Health workers could have a role in supporting families living with heart and mood problems to their care and treatment. The paper has highlighted the importance of working with families living with heart and mood problems to help them to stick with care and treatment.

Originality/value

Most people with heart and mood problems live with their families. The paper has highlighted the importance of working with families living with heart and mood problems to help them to persevere with care and treatment. MHN may have a role, though consideration should also be given to exploring the role of other health care workers and members of the community. As the population ages, clinicians and communities will need to consider the impact of depression on adherence when working with families living with CVD and depression.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2001

Irina Farquhar, Alan Sorkin, Kent Summers and Earl Weir

We study changes in age-specific diabetes-related mortality and annual health care utilization. We find that half of the estimated 16% increase of diabetic mortality falls…

Abstract

We study changes in age-specific diabetes-related mortality and annual health care utilization. We find that half of the estimated 16% increase of diabetic mortality falls within employable age groups. We estimate that disease combination-specific increase in case fatality has resulted in premature diabetic mortality costing $3.2 billion annually. The estimated annual direct cost of treating high-risk diabetics reaches $36 billion, of which Medicare and Other Federal Programs compensate 54%. Respiratory conditions among diabetics comprise the same proportion of high-risk diabetics as do the disease combinations including coronary heart diseases. Treating of general diabetic conditions has become more efficient as indicated by the estimated declines in per unit health care costs.

Details

Investing in Health: The Social and Economic Benefits of Health Care Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-070-8

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Elena Bassoli, Agar Brugiavini and Giacomo Pasini

We exploit the international comparability and the longitudinal dimension of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe to look at regional and cohort…

Abstract

We exploit the international comparability and the longitudinal dimension of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe to look at regional and cohort differences in disease prevalence across European regions. We find a significantly higher probability of reporting cardiovascular diseases among older Eastern European women than among other Europeans. Moreover, we observe a worsening in health conditions for younger cohorts.

Details

The Sustainability of Health Care Systems in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-499-6

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Stéphanie Baggio, Simon Guillaume-Gentil, Patrick Heller, Komal Chacowry Pala, Hans Wolff and Laurent Gétaz

Body-packing means concealing packets of illicit psychoactive substances in the digestive or genital system. The purpose of this paper is to investigate profiles of…

Abstract

Purpose

Body-packing means concealing packets of illicit psychoactive substances in the digestive or genital system. The purpose of this paper is to investigate profiles of body-packers and comorbidities associated with body-packing.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective study (2005–2016) was conducted among all patients hospitalized for suspicion of body-packing in the Geneva hospital prison unit (n=287). Data were extracted from medical records and included demographics, somatic/psychiatric diseases, suicidal ideation and psychological distress.

Findings

Body-packers were mostly young men (mean age=33.4). A total of 42.2 percent of the participants had at least one psychiatric or somatic comorbidity reported during incarceration (somatic: 28.2 percent, psychiatric: 18.8 percent). The most frequent somatic diseases were infectious (10.5 percent), cardiovascular (10.1 percent), and endocrinological (4.2 percent) diseases, and more precisely HIV (4.5 percent), hepatitis B (3.5 percent), hepatitis C (1.4 percent), high blood pressure (8.0 percent) and diabetes (4.2 percent). The most frequent psychiatric conditions were substance use disorders (10.5 percent) and mood disorders (8.0 percent). Depressed mood/psychological distress and suicidal ideation were frequently reported during hospitalization (27.2/6.6 percent). Comorbidities were associated with demographics: Females were more likely to have somatic and psychiatric diseases detected during hospitalization in detention and participants from Western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic countries were more likely to report diseases known before detention.

Originality/value

Body-packers bear a heavy burden of disease and psychological distress. This vulnerable subgroup of incarcerated people has been overlooked in previous research and their health needs are not correctly understood. This study was a first step to improve their health care and reintegration.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Sharan Srinivas, Kavin Anand and Anand Chockalingam

While cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally, over 80% of the cases could be prevented through early lifestyle changes. From the perspective…

Abstract

Purpose

While cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally, over 80% of the cases could be prevented through early lifestyle changes. From the perspective of quality management in healthcare, this may offer an effective prevention window if modifiable CVD risk factors are identified and treated in adolescence. The purpose of this research is to examine the negative emotions in adolescents and determine if it independently increases CVD risk later in life.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal data from 12,350 participants of the Add Health study, which conducted a multi-wave survey for 14 years from adolescence (Wave 1) through adulthood (Wave 4), were used to test the research hypothesis. Four items (perception of life, self-reported depression, perceived loneliness and fearfulness) reflective of adolescent negative emotion were identified from the Wave 1 questionnaire, and factor analysis was conducted to confirm the hypothesized structure. The outcome variable, 30-year adulthood CVD risk category (high or low risk), was estimated using biomarkers, biological data and other factors collected during the 14-year follow-up in Wave 4. A logistic regression analysis was employed to assess the impact of adolescent negative emotions on adulthood CVD risk after adjusting for common risk factors such as sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic status and medical conditions in adolescence.

Findings

The results indicated adolescent negative emotion to be significantly associated with CVD risk category (p-value < 0.0001), even after controlling for common risk factors. A unit increase in the level of adolescent negative emotion increased the chance of being in the high CVD risk group in adulthood by 8% (odds ratio = 1.08 ± 0.03).

Practical implications

Healthcare providers and organizations could capitalize on the research findings by screening for negative emotions early in life through individual and societal interventions. The findings also provide an opportunity for implementing quality improvement initiatives to deliver robust preventive care, which, in turn, could improve the overall population health, reduce healthcare costs and improve care quality.

Originality/value

Although previous studies showed a strong link between adolescent physiological factors (e.g. obesity) and adulthood cardiovascular disease (CVD), the association between adolescent outlook/attitude (negative emotion) and CVD risk has not been examined.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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The Digital Pill: What Everyone Should Know about the Future of Our Healthcare System
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-675-0

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Talitha Silva Meneguelli, Leidjaira Lopes Juvanhol, Adriana da Silva Leite, Josefina Bressan and Helen Hermana Miranda Hermsdorff

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the association between food consumption classified by the degree of processing and cardiometabolic risk factors in a population…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the association between food consumption classified by the degree of processing and cardiometabolic risk factors in a population at risk of cardiovascular disease.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study conducted with 325 adults and elderlies who present a cardiovascular risk factor. The food consumption was evaluated by a 24 h dietary recall, and it was classified according to the NOVA classification.

Findings

Individuals who presented a higher consumption of processed and ultra-processed food had a higher prevalence of abdominal obesity, waist/hip ratio (PR = 1.005; p-value = 0.049), waist circumference (PR = 1.003; p-value = 0.02) and high total cholesterol (PR = 1.008; p-value = 0.047), while ultra-processed had a higher prevalence of excess weight (PR = 1.004; p-value = 0.04), and abdominal obesity, waist/hip ratio (PR = 1.005; p-value = 0.04), waist circumference (PR = 1.004; p-value = 0.004) and waist/height ratio (PR = 1.003; p-value = 0.03).

Practical implications

An association was found between the degree of food processing and cardiometabolic risk factors, even in a population that already has a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the importance of personalized nutrition orientation that considers the profile of the target population as well as types of meals.

Originality/value

Food processing in itself can influence cardiometabolic risk and, as far as is known, no study has evaluated food processing in individuals who already have some type of cardiovascular risk. Also, consumption was assessed by the degree of processing between meals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Adelaide Antunes and Claudia Canongia

This paper aims to present a methodology for technological foresight and technological scanning based on S&T and knowledge indicators.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a methodology for technological foresight and technological scanning based on S&T and knowledge indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

This proposal considers S&T and knowledge indicators, such as a patents indicator (technology), research and development indicator (science) and competencies indicator (human resources). International databases and a data‐and text‐mining tool are used to build up knowledge maps and reference tables to support decision making.

Findings

This study provides information about the use of technological foresight and technological scanning using the biotechnology in the health sector as a case study. In this paper, the trends observed in patents and articles worldwide clearly show the growth in biotechnology, which points to the need to prioritize this area, as well as opening up a variety of opportunities, especially when one considers the human competencies already consolidated in Brazilian universities and research institutes, which could be better harnessed by industry and could help ensure greater innovation and competitiveness.

Originality/value

The paper presents a methodology for the effective support of decision taking during the prioritization of strategic and/or technological areas by visualizing potential markets and partnership opportunities. Furthermore, it emphasizes the role of biotechnology as a catalyst for S&T and innovations in the world.

Details

Foresight, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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