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Article

Paul Adjei Kwakwa

Attaining higher economic growth and development is among the topmost agenda for many countries. However, the process to attain such growth and development involves higher…

Abstract

Purpose

Attaining higher economic growth and development is among the topmost agenda for many countries. However, the process to attain such growth and development involves higher level of energy consumption and that may not spare the quality of the environment. A similar concern has been raised for Ghana as it aims to attain an upper middle-income status in the near future. The country's energy sector has however not been robust in meeting the electricity demand, leading to a recurrent power crisis. The study seeks to analyze the effect of income growth, electricity consumption and power crisis on Ghana's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on annual time series data from the World Bank (2020) and employs the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) and fully modified ordinary least square (FMOLS) estimation techniques for regression analysis.

Findings

The results showed that the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis is valid for Ghana in the case of carbon emissions. Also, while electricity consumption has an insignificant effect on carbon emissions, electricity power crisis exerts a positive effect on emission of CO2. It was also noted that industrialization and financial development increase CO2 emissions.

Research limitations/implications

Policy implications from the study include the EKC hypothesis can be a sound basis for environmental policy in Ghana. Other recommendations and areas for future research have been provided.

Originality/value

The study empirically estimates the effect of electricity crisis on CO2 emissions.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article

Paul Adjei Kwakwa

This study aims to fill the gap in existing studies that have analyzed the drivers of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The author investigate the long-run effects of energy…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to fill the gap in existing studies that have analyzed the drivers of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The author investigate the long-run effects of energy types, urbanization, financial development and, the interaction between urbanization and financial development on CO2 emissions.

Design/methodology/approach

Stochastic impacts by regression on population, affluence and technology model served as the framework for empirical modeling. Using annual time-series data for Tunisia, autoregressive distributed lag bounds test was used to examine the cointegration of the variables. Also, the fully modified ordinary least squares was used to estimate the emission effect of the explanatory variables. Further investigations were done using the principal component analysis and variance decomposition analysis.

Findings

Income, urbanization, trade and financial development exert upward pressure on CO2 emissions. However, the interaction between urbanization and financial development reduces the emission of CO2. Furthermore, primary energy use, energy intensity, electricity consumption and fossil fuel consumption have positive effects on carbon emission, while combustible renewables and waste, and electricity production from natural gas have negative effects on carbon emission.

Practical implications

The policy implication/recommendation indicates that the financial sector’s authorities can combat carbon emission by properly regulating the development and activities of the financial sector in urban areas in Tunisia. The promotion of the development and usage of cleaner energy is recommended to help reduce carbon emission. Policymakers need to promote environmentally friendly economic growth and development agenda.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study to the environmental degradation literature is that it offers evidence from Tunisia, which has not received much empirical attention. It also examines the effect of various forms of energy usage on carbon emission. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study to examine the interaction effect between urbanization and financial development on carbon emission. Also, if not the first, this study is among the earliest to use the principal component analysis as a part of the prediction of the carbon emission effect of energy variables.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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Article

Jayanthi Kumarasiri and Sumit Lodhia

This study aims to explore how large Australian companies in emission intensive industries perceived the introduction of the Carbon Tax as an approach to carbon emissions

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how large Australian companies in emission intensive industries perceived the introduction of the Carbon Tax as an approach to carbon emissions regulation and as a tool for accountability. It also investigates the influence of perceptions of the new tax on the internal carbon emissions management practices and the motivations for such actions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on transaction cost theory and legitimacy theory to address corporate perceptions, responses and motivations in relation to the Carbon Tax. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 senior managers directly responsible for the carbon emissions management of their companies.

Findings

The study found that the Carbon Tax, viewed by the high-emitting companies as a heavy financial burden, had a significant influence on moderating organisational legitimacy seeking behaviours. It is evident that the transaction cost issues in the form of the carbon pricing requirement has led to a change of focus to “management” rather than merely reporting to external stakeholders. This influenced companies to change their behaviour with the potential to internalise previous externalities of carbon pollution.

Research limitations/implications

This research highlights that a pricing signal in emissions regulations is essential in conjunction with external pressures to effectively stimulate emissions management actions in companies. It extends our understanding of legitimacy theory by suggesting that a mandatory pricing mechanism as explained by transaction cost economics has the potential to lead to actual changes in corporate behaviour through a focus on management rather than reporting.

Practical implications

The study highlights the important elements of any effective emissions policy designed to encourage strong emissions management actions from companies. Based on the findings of the study, it is evident that the Carbon Tax was a very effective mechanism in driving emission management actions, despite the general perception that any deficiencies associated with such a price mechanism could have a negative effect on the economy.

Social implications

Climate change is a critical issue for the modern society and this study discussed a short-lived policy tool in the Australian context that had the potential to change corporate behaviour in relation to carbon management.

Originality/value

This study is among the very few studies that have examined the influence of the Carbon Tax on internal emissions management practices of companies, and therefore, provides a unique dataset of corporate responses to the Carbon Tax. Given the short time frame that the Carbon Tax was in operation, the study enhances our understanding of the influence the Carbon Tax had on companies responsible for high greenhouse gas emissions.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Muhammad Jawad Sajid, Qingren Cao, Ming Cao and Shuang Li

Presentation of the different industrial carbon linkages of India. The purpose of this paper is to understand the direct and indirect impact of these industrial linkages.

Abstract

Purpose

Presentation of the different industrial carbon linkages of India. The purpose of this paper is to understand the direct and indirect impact of these industrial linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a hypothetical extraction method with its various extensions. Under this method, different carbon linkages of a block are removed from the economy, and the effects of carbon linkages are determined by the difference between the original and the post-removal values. Energy and non-energy carbon linkages are also estimated.

Findings

“Electricity, gas and water supply (EGW)” at 655.61 Mt and 648.74 Mt had the highest total and forward linkages. “manufacturing and recycling” at 231.48 Mt had the highest backward linkage. High carbon-intensive blocks of “EGW” plus “mining and quarrying” were net emitters, while others were net absorbers. “Fuel and chemicals” at 0.08 Mt had almost neutral status. Hard coal was the main source of direct and indirect emissions.

Practical implications

Net emitting and key net forward blocks should reduce direct emission intensities. India should use its huge geographical potential for industrial accessibility to cheaper alternative energy. This alongside with technology/process improvements catalyzed by policy tools can help in mitigation efforts. Next, key net-backward blocks such as construction through intermediate purchases significantly stimulate emissions from other blocks. Tailored mitigation policies are needed in this regard.

Originality/value

By developing an understanding of India’s industrial carbon links, this study can guide policymakers. In addition, the paper lays out the framework for estimating energy and non-energy-based industrial carbon links.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article

Yuanhua Yang, Dengli Tang and Peng Zhang

Fiscal fund is the key support of carbon emissions control for local governments. This paper aims to analyze the impact of fiscal decentralization on carbon emissions by…

Abstract

Purpose

Fiscal fund is the key support of carbon emissions control for local governments. This paper aims to analyze the impact of fiscal decentralization on carbon emissions by spatial Durbin model (SDM), and verify the existence of “free-riding” phenomenon to reveal the behavior of local governments in carbon emissions control.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the provincial data of carbon emissions from 2005 to 2016 in China, this paper uses spatial exploratory data analysis technology to analyze the spatial correlation characteristics and constructs SDM to test the impact of fiscal decentralization on carbon emissions.

Findings

The results show that carbon emissions exhibits significant spatial autocorrelation in China, and the increasing of fiscal decentralization in the region will increase carbon emissions in surrounding areas and on the whole. Then, by comparing the impact of fiscal decentralization on carbon emissions and industrial solid waste, it is found that “free-riding” phenomenon of carbon emissions control exists in China.

Practical implications

Based on the spatial cluster characteristics of China’s provincial carbon emissions, carbon emissions control regions can be divided into regions and different carbon emission control policies can be formulated for different cluster regions. Carbon emissions indicators should be included in the government performance appraisal policy, and carbon emissions producer survey should be increased in environmental policies to avoid “free-riding” behaviors of local government in carbon emissions control in China.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to fill this gap and fully considers the spatial spillover characteristics of carbon emissions by introducing spatial exploratory data analysis technology, constructs SDM to test the impact of fiscal decentralization on carbon emissions in the perspective of space econometrics, and tests the existence of “free-riding” phenomenon in carbon emissions control for local governments in China.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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Article

Chika Saka and Tomoki Oshika

The main purpose of this study is to examine the impact of corporate carbon emissions and disclosure on corporate value, especially regarding whether disclosure helps to…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to examine the impact of corporate carbon emissions and disclosure on corporate value, especially regarding whether disclosure helps to reduce uncertainty in valuation as predicted by carbon emissions using a unique data set on Japanese companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical analysis of the relations between corporate carbon emissions using compulsory filing data to Japanese Government covering more than 1,000 firms, corporate carbon management disclosure (CDP disclosure), and the market value of equity.

Findings

The authors find that corporate carbon emissions have a negative relation with the market value of equity, the disclosure of carbon management has a positive relation with the market value of equity, and the positive relation between the disclosure of carbon management and the market value of equity is stronger with a larger volume of carbon emissions.

Practical implications

The results may be important when considering the inclusion of carbon disclosure as a component of nonfinancial disclosure. In addition, the findings encourage Japanese companies to reduce carbon emissions and to disclose their carbon management activities.

Originality/value

The authors provide the first empirical evidence of an interactive effect between the volume of carbon emissions and carbon management disclosure on the market value of equity. And, the results concerning the relation between environmental performance, disclosure, and market value are readily generalizable, especially as all companies emit carbon, either directly or indirectly. In addition, the results are arguably free of problems with sampling bias and endogeneity as the authors employ data obtained from the compulsory filing of carbon emissions information.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article

Chiranjit Das and Sanjay Jharkharia

The purpose of this paper is to review the relevant literature on low carbon supply chain management (LCSCM) and classify it on contextual base. It also aims at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the relevant literature on low carbon supply chain management (LCSCM) and classify it on contextual base. It also aims at identifying key decision-making issues in LCSCM. This paper also highlights some of the future challenges and scope of research in this domain.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis is carried out by systematically collecting the literature from major academic sources over a period of 18 years (2000-2017), identifying structural dimensions and classifying it on contextual base.

Findings

There is an increasing trend of research on LCSCM, but this research is still in a nascent stage. All supply chain functions such as supplier selection, inventory planning, network design and logistic decisions have been redefined by integrating emissions-related issues.

Research limitations/implications

Limitation of this study is inherent in its unit of analysis. Only peer-reviewed journal articles published in English language have been considered in this study.

Practical implications

Findings of prior studies on low carbon inventory control, transportation planning, facility allocation, location selection and supply chain coordination have been highlighted in this study. This will help supply chain practitioners in decision making.

Originality/value

Though there are an increasing number of studies about carbon emission-related issues in supply chain management, the present literature lacks to provide a review of the overarching publications. This paper addresses this gap by providing a comprehensive review of literature on emissions-related issues in supply chain management.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Lei Wen and Linlin Huang

Climate change has aroused widespread concern around the world, which is one of the most complex challenges encountered by human beings. The underlying cause of climate…

Abstract

Purpose

Climate change has aroused widespread concern around the world, which is one of the most complex challenges encountered by human beings. The underlying cause of climate change is the increase of carbon emissions. To reduce carbon emissions, the analysis of the factors affecting this type of emission is of practical significance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper identified five factors affecting carbon emissions using the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) decomposition model (e.g. per capita carbon emissions, industrial structure, energy intensity, energy structure and per capita GDP). Besides, based on the projection pursuit method, this paper obtained the optimal projection directions of five influencing factors in 30 provinces (except for Tibet). Based on the data from 2000 to 2014, the authors predicted the optimal projection directions in the next six years under the Markov transfer matrix.

Findings

The results indicated that per capita GDP was the critical factor for reducing carbon emissions. The industrial structure and population intensified carbon emissions. The energy structure had seldom impacted on carbon emissions. The energy intensity obviously inhibited carbon emissions. The best optimal projection direction of each index in the next six years remained stable. Finally, this paper proposed the policy implications.

Originality/value

This paper provides an insight into the current state and the future changes in carbon emissions.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article

Z. Ren, V. Chrysostomou and T. Price

The purpose of this research project is to reduce the carbon emissions of construction processes by Measuring, Mapping, Modelling and Managing (4Ms) the carbon performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research project is to reduce the carbon emissions of construction processes by Measuring, Mapping, Modelling and Managing (4Ms) the carbon performance of construction activities. This particular paper presents the research work and major findings in the first two stages: measuring the carbon footprint of construction activities in building projects; and mapping the carbon emissions from construction activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A hotel project in South Wales was selected as a case study where the carbon emissions from six categories of construction activities (i.e. management, operations, visitors, deliveries, plant and utilities) were monitored by using carefully designed data collection methods throughout the construction process. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis methods were adopted to distil and map the emissions with construction activities.

Findings

This study provides a benchmark for the carbon emissions from construction processes. The results show that construction activities generate more carbon than expected. Of the CO2 emitted, materials delivery, operational activities and plant operation account for more than 90 per cent of the total emissions. Activities from management, visitors and utilities only contributed 10 per cent of the CO2 emissions. Carbon emissions from construction processes can be best managed through project planning/scheduling where carbon emissions should be considered as a new criterion for project planning along with time, cost and quality.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations with the data collection methods adopted in this study. For example, the fuel/CO2 emission conversion rate for plant was obtained from online sources. This rate needs to be validated and adjusted on‐site with CO2 measurement gauges for different equipment. Similarly, the fuel efficiency adjusting rates for vehicles also need to be checked and verified constantly.

Practical implications

The on‐site carbon emission methods, the mapping approaches between the emission and construction activities, and the online system developed in this study (www.constructco2.com/default.aspx) are all embraced by the industry. So far, 76 projects have already subscripted to the online system.

Originality/value

This study developed a set of systematic and feasible approaches to measuring and analysing carbon emissions from construction activities. Unlike the existing studies which mainly focus on recording the carbon emissions on‐site, this research measured the emissions, and mapped the emissions with construction activities. The online system developed could analyse the data collected and support the contractor to decide in which aspects they should make effort to control the carbon emissions.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article

Charl De Villiers, Sile Chen, Chenxing jin and Yiner Zhu

– The authors aim to investigate the ability of a New Zealand university to rely on the CO2 sequestered in the trees on campus to mitigate the CO2 emissions caused by operations.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to investigate the ability of a New Zealand university to rely on the CO2 sequestered in the trees on campus to mitigate the CO2 emissions caused by operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors count and measure the trees on the university's 68 hectare main campus, ignoring smaller trees that sequester very little CO2.

Findings

The authors estimate that the 4,139 trees the authors count contain 5,809 tonnes of CO2. The authors further estimate the additional CO2 sequestration over the next ten years to be 253 tonnes per year. The university's annual CO2 emissions were 4,086 tonnes in 2011. More than 70 per cent of this amount relates to overseas travel. Therefore, CO2 sequestration in trees promises to mitigate only about 6 per cent of total emissions over the next ten years.

Practical implications

This suggests that other initiatives will be needed if the university is serious about reducing its greenhouse gas emissions impact. An obvious avenue appears to be to reduce overseas travel, e.g. by finding different ways for academic staff to network and obtain feedback on their research. Other universities and other organisations starting to investigate their environmental impact are likely to similarly find that CO2 sequestration in trees can only provide limited mitigation opportunities.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the ongoing debate around carbon emissions, exploring avenues to mitigate CO2 emissions.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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