Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Mena Farazi, Ahmad Jayedi, Zahra Noruzi, Fatemeh Dehghani Firouzabadi, Elaheh Asgari, Kurosh Djafarian and Sakineh Shab-Bidar

This paper aims to evaluate the association between carbohydrate quality index (CQI) and nutrient adequacy in Iranian adults.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the association between carbohydrate quality index (CQI) and nutrient adequacy in Iranian adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 268 men and women with ages ranged from 18 to 70 years were evaluated in a cross-sectional study. The CQI was calculated by adding together the three components, namely, the ratio of solid to total carbohydrate, dietary fiber and glycemic index. The scores of three components were summed to calculate the CQI, with a higher score indicating a higher dietary carbohydrate quality. The odds ratios (ORs) of nutrient adequacy ratio (NAR), defined as the ratio of intake of a nutrient to the age- and gender-specific recommended dietary allowance, for the intake of energy and 10 nutrients across quartiles of the CQI were calculated by logistic regression analysis and expressed with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Findings

CQI ranged between 3 to 15 (mean ± SD: 9 ± 1.9). Being in top versus bottom quartile of the CQI was associated with a higher NAR of folic acid (OR: 3.20, 95% CI: 1.06–9.62; P-trend: <0.001), vitamin A (OR: 3.66; 95% CI: 1.46–9.17; P-trend: <0.001), magnesium (OR: 5.94; 95% CI; 1.71–20.53; P-trend: <0.001), vitamin C (OR: 7.85; 95% CI; 2.99–20.59; P-trend: <0.001).

Originality/value

A higher CQI was associated with greater micronutrient consumption adequacy in Iranian adults. The results suggest that increasing the consumption of total fiber and solid carbohydrates and decreasing the glycemic index of the diet and liquid carbohydrates can improve micronutrient intake adequacy.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Meira Fields

Recent studies have shown that the type of dietary carbohydrateconsumed greatly affects copper homeostasis. Simple sugars such assucrose and fructose exacerbate the signs…

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that the type of dietary carbohydrate consumed greatly affects copper homeostasis. Simple sugars such as sucrose and fructose exacerbate the signs associated with the deficiency, and the consumption results in the mortality of the animal. In contrast, complex carbohydrates such as starch ameliorates the deficiency and protects against the morbidity and mortality of copper deficiency. This is the first of a two‐part article in which the effects of dietary carbohydrates on metabolic, biochemical and physiological pathways associated with copper deficiency in experimental animals and humans are summarised. In the first part of the review the effects that dietary carbohydrates exert on copper absorption, distribution and excretion are discussed. In addition, the role that copper plays in carbohydrate metabolism, insulin secretion and binding, glucose tolerance and the complications of diabetes (retinopathy and glomerular nephropathy) is reviewed. In the second part, the attention is focused on the cardiovascular system, sexual differences in copper‐carbohydrate interaction and copper deficiency during pregnancy and lactation. The mechanisms that may play a role in this interaction are discussed.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Lorraine L. Niba and Suh N. Niba

The contribution of non‐digestible carbohydrates to colon cancer protection is becoming more clearly established. While the causes of colon cancer are multifold…

Abstract

The contribution of non‐digestible carbohydrates to colon cancer protection is becoming more clearly established. While the causes of colon cancer are multifold, experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that various dietary components play a significant role in the mitigation of various colon cancer‐inducing factors. Recent developments in the characterization and quantification of these components, which include fructooligosaccharides, dietary fiber and resistant starch, indicate an association between their intake and colon cancer prevention. Considerable physicochemical modifications occur in the colon with the presence of non‐digestible carbohydrates, primarily because these carbohydrates act as selective prebiotic fermentation substrates for beneficial colonic probiotic bacteria to produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA). These SCFA elicit effects such as alteration in preneoplastic lesions, enzyme induction, suppression of mutations, and binding of potential carcinogens. Prebiotic‐probiotic interaction and activity is therefore key in colon cancer protection by non‐digestible carbohydrates.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1975

Ivan M. Sharman

During recent years interest in nutrition has tended to be centred upon the need for vitamins, the importance of proteins, the energy promoting qualities of fat, upon…

Abstract

During recent years interest in nutrition has tended to be centred upon the need for vitamins, the importance of proteins, the energy promoting qualities of fat, upon mineral requirements and similar topics. Thus much attention has been directed to the role that vitamins play in promoting health and the necessity for meeting their recommended daily intakes. It is perhaps not surprising, therefore, that the contribution that carbohydrates make to the diet has tended to be overlooked and even forgotten. Furthermore carbohydrates have at times, been actually incriminated and considered undesirable. An instance of this is the alleged association of the consumption of larger amounts of purified white sugar with an increase in the prevalence of ischaemic heart disease. It will be the purpose of this article to ‘restore the balance’ of the importance and usefulness of carbohydrates in our diet.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 75 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

M. Bekers, M. Grube, D. Upite, E. Kaminska, R. Linde, R. Scherbaka, A. Danilevich, M. Bekers, M. Grube, D. Upite, E. Kaminska, R. Linde, R. Scherbaka and A. Danilevich

The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of temperature and action time on the extraction rate of carbohydrates of Jerusalem artichoke concentrate powder and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of temperature and action time on the extraction rate of carbohydrates of Jerusalem artichoke concentrate powder and inactivation of inulin during boiling and sterilization.

Design/methodology/approach

Water suspension of Jerusalem artichoke concentrate (5g/100ml) at 25, 50 and 100C was tested after 5, 15, 30 and 60min to determine the content of inulin, glucose, fructose and sucrose and evaluate the extraction rate. The stability of inulin was studied after boiling and sterilization at 120C during 1, 2 and 3h. The extraction rate was evaluated by Fourier‐Transform Infrared (FT‐IR) spectroscopy as well.

Findings

It was shown that extraction of soluble carbohydrates – fructose, glucose, sucrose and inulin, from water suspension of Jerusalem artichoke concentrate was practically completed in 5min at 25C. The extraction rate was not significantly influenced by temperatures lower than 100C. Inulin was stable during boiling for 1h but sterilization for 1h caused significant losses. Infrared spectral analysis of soluble and insoluble fractions showed that inulin was practically fully extracted.

Originality/value

The paper shows that inulin can be easily extracted from Jerusalem artichoke concentrate powder even at 25C and it maintains for 60min at temperatures up to 100C, nevertheless boiling or sterilization at higher temperatures for longer time causes significant loses of inulin and consequently the functional quality of Jerusalem artichoke powder. These results must be taken into account when applying inulin concentrates as functional food components.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Viviane Andrade de Oliveira, Gilmar Freire da Costa and Solange de Sousa

The purpose of this study is to investigate the chemical and microbiological quality of biscuits and bread through the partial substitution of the wheat flour.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the chemical and microbiological quality of biscuits and bread through the partial substitution of the wheat flour.

Design/methodology/approach

Completely randomized experiment with four treatments and nine replications was used in this study. The quality of biscuits and bread formulations was monitored by chemical parameters (moisture, ashes, protein, lipids, pH, water activity, acidity and carbohydrates) and microbiological parameters (coliforms at 35 and 45ºC, coagulase positive Staphylococcus and Salmonella sp.).

Findings

The formulation of biscuits containing 25, 50 and 75% of cassava flour and formulation of bread containing 10, 20 and 30% of cassava flour had higher carbohydrate content compared to the control formulation (p = 0.014). This was associated with the incorporation of cassava flour, which is an excellent producer of carbohydrates compared to other cereals. All formulations showed values <3 for coliforms at 35 and 45ºC and coagulase positive Staphylococci, as well as an absence for Salmonella sp.

Originality/value

The present attempt was made to formulate biscuits and bread with a reduction in wheat flour and the addition of manioc flour, with the objective of reaching products with higher carbohydrate content and low gluten content, to improve the nutritional level and commercial value of these products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Darla D. O'Dwyer and Ray L. Darville

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the impact of specific carbohydrate restriction (polysaccharides and disaccharides) in the form of the specific carbohydrate

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the impact of specific carbohydrate restriction (polysaccharides and disaccharides) in the form of the specific carbohydrate diet (SCD) in treating irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Design/methodology/approach

A female patient diagnosed with diarrhea predominant IBS was assigned to the SCD for six months. The diet occurred in phases and was advanced based on the individual’s tolerance level under the guidance of a registered dietitian. Quality of life was measured by a pre- and post-IBS severity score questionnaire. Gastrointestinal symptoms were measured by self-assessment of IBS symptoms using a seven-point Likert-like scale, with −3 = substantially worse to +3 = substantially better. Probiotics were consumed throughout the duration of the study.

Findings

The quality of life severity score significantly improved from a severity of 315 (with 500 being the most severe) to 15. The initial symptoms from the first day on the diet compared to the total period for bloating, abdominal pain/discomfort, flatulence/wind, diarrhea, bowel urgency, stool consistency, stool frequency, energy levels, incomplete evacuation and abdominal rumbling were improved significantly (p < 0.0005). The SCD diet significantly improved the quality of life and IBS symptoms in a female patient with IBS-diarrhea.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to evaluate the efficacy of the SCD to treat IBS. The SCD should be considered a therapeutic option to treating IBS after fermentable carbohydrate restriction.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1973

Dorothy Hollingsworth

In most diets in the world some 10–12% of the energy value is supplied by protein, but there is great variation in the proportions provided by fats and carbohydrates. If…

Abstract

In most diets in the world some 10–12% of the energy value is supplied by protein, but there is great variation in the proportions provided by fats and carbohydrates. If alcoholic drinks are excluded from the calculations, in Britain in 1971 42% of the energy value of the total food supply was derived from fat and 47% from carbohydrate: 17% was supplied by sucrose. In the first quarter of the century and in World War II about one‐third came from fat and about 55% from carbohydrate: in the first quarter of the century sucrose provided 14–15% of the total energy value of the food supply and in World War II about 11%.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 73 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Faharuddin Faharuddin, Andy Mulyana, M. Yamin and Yunita Yunita

The purpose of this paper is to assess nutrients elasticities of calories, proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess nutrients elasticities of calories, proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System is used on Indonesian socioeconomic household survey data.

Findings

Expenditure elasticities of nutrients in overall model range from 0.707 (for carbohydrates) to 1.085 (for fats), but expenditure elasticities in rural areas are higher than those in urban area. Most of price elasticities of nutrients have very small absolute value (not elastic) and all values are lower than the expenditure elasticities. However, the price of five groups of food commodities, namely, rice, oil and grease, fishes, meat, and other foods give significant influence on nutrients consumption.

Research limitations/implications

This research only includes four micronutrients, namely, calorie, protein, fat, and carbohydrate.

Originality/value

This research is one of very limited literatures about nutrient elasticity of food consumption in Indonesia.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

David J. Mela and Peter J. Rogers

Briefly reviews issues of palatability, food composition, energymetabolism, and eating behaviour in relation to overeating and obesity,with a particular emphasis on the…

Abstract

Briefly reviews issues of palatability, food composition, energy metabolism, and eating behaviour in relation to overeating and obesity, with a particular emphasis on the possible role of popular, sweet and high‐fat “snack” foods. Consumption of such foods may be one contributor to a high overall dietary fat intake. However, while it is increasingly clear that relative intakes of fat (but not carbohydrate) may be causally associated with the development of obesity, it is difficult to relate this condition to the consumption of any single food or food group. Many popular “snack” foods present problems of control for individuals attempting to restrict or reduce their energy intakes and, by virtue of the high fat content and energy density of such foods, they may be viewed as possible contributors to overeating amongst susceptible individuals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000