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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Stuart James

62

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 August 2022

Stefan Tscharaktschiew and Felix Reimann

Recent studies on commuter parking in an age of fully autonomous vehicles (FAVs) suggest, that the number of parking spaces close to the workplace demanded by commuters…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent studies on commuter parking in an age of fully autonomous vehicles (FAVs) suggest, that the number of parking spaces close to the workplace demanded by commuters will decline because of the capability of FAVs to return home, to seek out (free) parking elsewhere or just cruise. This would be good news because, as of today, parking is one of the largest consumers of urban land and is associated with substantial costs to society. None of the studies, however, is concerned with the special case of employer-provided parking, although workplace parking is a widespread phenomenon and, in many instances, the dominant form of commuter parking. The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether commuter parking will decline with the advent of self-driving cars when parking is provided by the employer.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at commuter parking from the perspective of both the employer and the employee because in the case of employer-provided parking, the firm’s decision to offer a parking space and the incentive of employees to accept that offer are closely interrelated because of the fringe benefit character of workplace parking. This study develops an economic equilibrium model that explicitly maps the employer–employee relationship, considering the treatment of parking provision and parking policy in the income tax code and accounting for adverse effects from commuting, parking and public transit. This study determines the market level of employer-provided parking in the absence and presence of FAVs and identifies the factors that drive the difference. This study then approximates the magnitude of each factor, relying on recent (first) empirical evidence on the impacts of FAVs.

Findings

This paper’s analysis suggests that as long as distortive (tax) policy favors employer-provided parking, FAVs are no guarantee to end up with less commuter parking.

Originality/value

This study’s findings imply that in a world of self-driving cars, policy intervention related to work commuting (e.g. fringe benefit taxation or transport pricing) might be even more warranted than today.

Details

Journal of Intelligent and Connected Vehicles, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-9802

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

P. Vavasour and C. Vignali

The article highlights the importance of the company car as a major motivational tool used by employers when developing their employment policies. Research was carried out…

1284

Abstract

The article highlights the importance of the company car as a major motivational tool used by employers when developing their employment policies. Research was carried out in a specific industry to highlight the differences that were perceived by employees in competing companies within a specific market sector. Changes in the Government Tax Laws with regard to “benefit in kind”, have tainted the individuals’ view of what was a key motivational tool. The different variables that employers assume are essential factors are highlighted, whilst closer analysis indicates the differing perceived value to the employee. The differing views are based on the varying levels of needs sustained by employees whilst the examination of the hierarchy of these needs is identified within the target groups selected. A clearer perception of how a major motivational tool can act as a demotivator is highlighted, and the findings are evaluated in the conclusions of the article.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1966

L. J. Sellers, L. J. Danckwerts and L. J. Winn

July 21, 1966. Negligence — Contributory negligence — Plaintiff workman crushed by guide car in steelworks — Movement of car without warning after plaintiff discharged…

Abstract

July 21, 1966. Negligence — Contributory negligence — Plaintiff workman crushed by guide car in steelworks — Movement of car without warning after plaintiff discharged from car to repair another vehicle —Car driver's admitted negligence — Plaintiff's assumption that guide car would not be moved — Whether assumption justified — Whether failure to keep a proper look out — Whether contributory negligence. Damages — Quantum — Semi‐paraplegic — Grave injuries to lower part of body — Plaintiff fit for light work and mobile — Proper amount of damages.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2022

Nazanin Tahssili and Mohammad Ali Shahhoseini

This study aims to examine the customer’s perception of corporate social responsibility within the automotive market in Tehran, Iran, and whether it leads to a purchasing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the customer’s perception of corporate social responsibility within the automotive market in Tehran, Iran, and whether it leads to a purchasing behavior directly or indirectly through support intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 235 customers of luxury and mid-range-priced automobiles were surveyed and analyzed using the partial least squares structural equation modeling method.

Findings

Regarding luxury car owners, the authors concluded that both economical and ethical perceptions are indirectly related to purchasing behavior. Concerning mid-range-priced car buyers, both philanthropic and economical perceptions have a direct relationship with purchasing behavior, while the legal perception has an indirect relationship with purchasing behavior. The results show that Iranian car manufacturers and foreign car dealerships for both luxury and mid-range customers should focus on their economical responsibilities. The results show that luxury car manufacturers and dealerships should act ethically. With the importance of the philanthropic dimension for customers of mid-range cars, car dealerships dealing with mid-range-priced cars should focus more on their philanthropic activities. This study can help companies find better solutions to adjust their corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies to the consumers’ beliefs, gain a competitive advantage in the market and fill the knowledge gap regarding Iranian consumers.

Originality/value

Although some research has been conducted on consumer perception and response regarding CSR in both developed and developing countries, no studies on consumer perception toward CSR have been carried out in Iran.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Auto Motives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85-724234-1

Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2014

John Bates

This chapter examines the primary factors affecting the demand for parking, distinguishing between residential demands and parking at other destinations. The demand for…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines the primary factors affecting the demand for parking, distinguishing between residential demands and parking at other destinations. The demand for parking relates not only to where people may want to park, but also at what time and for how long.

Methodology/approach

This chapter is largely based on an analysis of the Great Britain National Travel Survey (NTS), over the period 2002–2010. While data on residential parking is straightforward to obtain, extracting data for non-residential parking involves ‘following’ successive trips made by the same vehicle and deriving the duration of parking, using the NTS 7-day trip diary.

Findings

At the home end, the main variations in parking demand are related to housing type and residential density: the issues associated with residential parking are essentially an urban problem. At the destination end, commuting parking dominates because (a) it is the largest single purpose category; (b) with the minor exception of Holiday parking, it has the greatest duration; and (c) the onset of working time is more concentrated than that for other purposes. Nonetheless, at the peak of destination parking activity (around 12 noon), other purposes add about 44% to the base demand due to workplace parking.

The analysis also reveals that only a small percentage of destination parking acts make any payment, and that for those that do, the average is under £2 per stay. On an annual basis, it is suggested that parking consumes about 3% of motoring expenditure but 97% of motoring time (on average).

Practical implications

Residential Parking is only a significant problem at higher densities (above 45 ppHa, say) where the housing types required to support the population density result in competition for on-street parking. For non-residential parking, the dominance of commuter parking causes particular problems both in terms of space provision and its impact on mode choice. Neither form of parking capacity appears to be well managed by current pricing policy, at least on the basis of the British evidence.

Originality/value of paper

To the author’s knowledge, diary travel surveys have not previously been analysed to investigate parking demand. While the technique is most relevant to multiple-day diaries like NTS, the approach opens up the possibility of more extensive analysis of other surveys to reveal the patterns of parking, and duration in particular.

Details

Parking Issues and Policies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-919-5

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Autonomous Driving
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-834-5

Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2014

Steven Melia

This chapter defines and describes the different types of carfree and low-car development found in the United Kingdom and continental Europe, analysing the benefits and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter defines and describes the different types of carfree and low-car development found in the United Kingdom and continental Europe, analysing the benefits and problems they bring and their implications for parking policy.

Methodology/approach

The chapter draws on the literature on UK and European carfree developments, including primary research conducted by the author into the potential for carfree development in the United Kingdom. It is also informed by a series of observational visits to some of the principal carfree developments around Europe.

Findings

The UK concepts of car-free and low-car housing are limited in scope, defined by the absence or reduced level of parking. The European concept of carfree development is broader, bringing greater benefits to the immediate residents. All have led to lower traffic generation. European carfree developments bring other benefits to their residents such as more socialisation between neighbours and earlier independence for children. The potential demand for car-free and low-car housing is greatest in the inner areas of larger cities. These are also the places which offer the most suitable development locations. The most common problems encountered relate to parking and/or management of vehicular access. To avoid overspill problems, parking needs to be controlled on the streets surrounding carfree or low-car developments.

Practical implications

The benefits of carfree development are greatest in urban areas where road capacity and/or parking are under the greatest pressure. Thus carfree development is a useful tool for cities undergoing urban intensification.

Originality/value of paper

The chapter is the first to analyse carfree and low-car development from a parking perspective and to demonstrate their implications for parking policy.

Details

Parking Issues and Policies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-919-5

Keywords

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