Search results

1 – 10 of over 41000
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Jiawei Wang, Yanmin Jia, Guanhua Zhang, Jigang Han and Jinliang Liu

Most existing studies are confined to model beam tests, which cannot reflect the actual strengthening effects provided by prestressed carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer…

Abstract

Purpose

Most existing studies are confined to model beam tests, which cannot reflect the actual strengthening effects provided by prestressed carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) plates to existing bridges. Hence, the actual capacity for strengthening existing bridges with prestressed CFRP plates is becoming an important concern for researchers. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Static load tests of in-service prestressed concrete hollow slabs before and after strengthening are conducted. Based on the results of the tests, the failure characteristics, failure mechanism and bending performance of the slabs are compared and analyzed. Nonlinear finite element method is also used to calculate the flexural strength of the strengthened beams prestressed with CFRP plates.

Findings

Test results show that prestressed CFRP plate strengthening technology changes the failure mode of hollow slabs, delays the development of deflection and cracks, raises cracking and ultimate load-carrying capacity and remarkably improves mechanical behavior of the slab. In addition, the nonlinear finite element analyses are in good agreement with the test results.

Originality/value

Strengthening with prestressed CFRP plates has greater advantages compared to traditional CFRP plate strengthening technology and improves active material utilization. The presented finite element method can be applied in the flexural response calculations of strengthened beams prestressed with CFRP plates. The research results provide technical basis for maintenance and reinforcement design of existing bridges.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2011

Severine M. Rugumamu

Capacity development in fragile environments in Africa has often proven to be a complex undertaking. This has largely been because of existing knowledge gaps on what…

Abstract

Capacity development in fragile environments in Africa has often proven to be a complex undertaking. This has largely been because of existing knowledge gaps on what exactly causes fragility of states, the economy and society. The liberal peace development model that generally informs post‐conflict reconstruction and capacity development has a limited conception of fragility by narrowly focusing on the national dimensions of the problem, promoting donor‐driven solutions, emphasizing minimal participation of beneficiary actors in the identification and prioritization of capacity development needs, and by subcontracting the design and management of projects and programs. The resulting capacity development impact has generally been disappointing. In the absence of homegrown strategic plans, stakeholder participation and ownership, international development partners have all too often addressed capacity gaps by financing training, supply of equipment and professional exchanges of parliamentarians and parliamentary staffers. These efforts usually achieved their presumed number targets but tended to ignore addressing the larger issues of political economy within which capacity development take place. However, the recent re‐conceptualization of parliamentary capacity development as a development of nationally owned, coordinated, harmonized, and aligned development activities seems to be gaining growing attention in Africa. As the experience of Rwanda eloquently demonstrates, capacity development is essentially about politics, economics and power, institutions and incentives, habits and attitudes – factors that are only partly susceptible to technical fixes and quantitative specifications. These structural factors have to be negotiated carefully and tactfully.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Zoe Scott, Kelly Wooster, Roger Few, Anne Thomson and Marcela Tarazona

– The purpose of this paper is to focus on improving the monitoring and evaluation of DRM capacity development initiatives.

1337

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on improving the monitoring and evaluation of DRM capacity development initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first explores the complexities and challenges presented in the literature, before using empirical data from a research project in six countries (Ethiopia, Pakistan, Myanmar, Philippines, Haiti and Mozambique) to discuss current approaches to M & E of DRM capacity strengthening interventions.

Findings

This is generally an area of technical weakness in the initiatives studied, with poor understanding of terminology, little attention to outcomes or impact and few independent evaluations. The need for greater inclusion of participants in M & E processes is identified and one programme from the fieldwork in Mozambique is presented as a case study example.

Originality/value

The paper ends by presenting a unique M & E framework developed for use by DRM programmes to track the outcomes of their interventions and ultimately raise standards in this area.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Lina Frennesson, Joakim Kembro, Harwin de Vries, Luk Van Wassenhove and Marianne Jahre

To meet the rising global needs, the humanitarian community has signed off on making a strategic change toward more localisation, which commonly refers to the empowerment…

3093

Abstract

Purpose

To meet the rising global needs, the humanitarian community has signed off on making a strategic change toward more localisation, which commonly refers to the empowerment of national and local actors in humanitarian assistance. However, to this date, actual initiatives for localisation are rare. To enhance understanding of the phenomenon, the authors explore localisation of logistics preparedness capacities and obstacles to its implementation. The authors particularly take the perspective of the international humanitarian organisation (IHO) community as they are expected to implement the localisation strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenon-driven, exploratory and qualitative study was conducted. Data collection included in-depth interviews with 28 experienced humanitarian professionals.

Findings

The findings showed the ambiguity inherent in the localisation strategy with largely different views on four important dimensions. Particularly, the interviewees differ about strengthening external actors or internal national/local offices. The resulting framework visualises the gap between strategy formulation and implementation, which forms major obstacles to the localisation aims.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required to support the advancement of localisation of logistics preparedness capacities. Important aspects for future research include triangulation of results, other stakeholder perspectives and the influence of context.

Practical implications

The authors add to the important debate surrounding localisation by offering remedies to overcoming obstacles to strategy implementation. Further, the authors’ proposed framework offers a language to precisely describe the ways in which IHOs (should) view localisation of logistics preparedness capacities and its operationalisation.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first academic article on localisation within the humanitarian logistics context.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Rona Bahreini, Masoumeh Gholizadeh, Fethiye Gulin Gedik, Mahmoud Yousefi and Ali Janati

The purpose of this study is to identify components of contributing conditions to strengthen leadership and management capacity in the health system.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify components of contributing conditions to strengthen leadership and management capacity in the health system.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search was undertaken in databases including PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and local resources of Scientific Information Database and Magiran in January 2020. Two independent researchers checked the research process, screening of articles and quality assessment. The quality of the studies was assessed by JBI critical appraisal tools for qualitative studies. The components of the dimensions of health system management and leadership capacity were categorized according to the WHO conceptual framework using a content analysis approach.

Findings

A total of 17 articles were included in this study. In total, 16 categories of components include human resource information system (n = 5); criteria, plans and procedures for selection and appointment (n = 5); development of education system (n = 11); skills (n = 39); knowledge (n = 8); attitudes (n = 6); behaviors (n = 10); resource and critical management system (n = 7); performance and processes management (n = 3); operational planning for critical systems (n = 4); establish control systems (n = 2); inputs and outputs of organizations (n = 2); accountability and responsibility to customers and stakeholders (n = 4); legal authority and requirements to play the role of managers (n = 9); external and internal environment management (n = 7); establish a system of appreciation and encouragement (n = 6). Each of these categories also contains subcategories.

Originality/value

Identifying prerequisite conditions are necessary for building leadership and management capacity in health systems. Therefore, extracted components provide a simple but coherent framework that can be adapted or modified for use in local situations. The components have a variety of uses, including mapping current activities, needs assessment, planning leadership and management development strategies and monitoring and evaluation.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Abdurra’uf Mukhtar Gora, Jayaprakash Jaganathan, Mohammed Parvez Anwar and Hau Y. Leung

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of experimental and theoretical studies on the flexural capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of experimental and theoretical studies on the flexural capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened using externally bonded bi-directional glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites and different end anchorage systems.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of nine RC beams with a length of 1,600 mm and a cross-section of 200 mm depth and 100 mm width were prepared and externally strengthened in flexure with bi-directional GFRP composites. These strengthened beams were anchored with three different end anchorage systems namely closed GFRP wraps, GFRP U-wraps and mechanical anchors. All these beams were tested with four-point bending system up to failure. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical results obtained using the relevant design guidelines.

Findings

The experimental results demonstrate a significant increase in the flexural performance of the GFRP strengthened beams with regard to the ultimate load carrying capacity and stiffness. The results also show that GFRP strengthened beams without end anchorages experienced intermediate concrete debonding failure at the GFRP plate end, whereas all the GFRP strengthened beams with different end anchorage systems failed in rupture of GFRP with concrete crushing. The theoretical results revealed no significant difference among the relevant design guidelines with regard to the predicted ultimate moment capacities of the bi-directional GFRP strengthened RC beams. However, the results show that ACI Committee 440 Report (2008) design recommendation provides reasonably acceptable predictions for the ultimate moment capacities of the tested beams strengthened externally with bi-directional GFRP reinforcement followed by FIB Bulletin 14 (2001) and eventually by JSCE (1997).

Originality/value

The research work presented in this manuscript is authentic and could contribute to the understanding of the overall behaviour of RC beams strengthened with FRP and different end anchorage systems under flexural loading.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2012

Laxmi Prasad Pant, Helen Hambly-Odame, Andy Hall and Rasheed Sulaiman V.

Despite favourable agro-ecological conditions and being the largest international mango producer, India still struggles to build competence in sustainable mango production…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite favourable agro-ecological conditions and being the largest international mango producer, India still struggles to build competence in sustainable mango production and post-harvest. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on innovation capacity development, and to explore aspects of innovation systems ideas in the analysis of mango production and marketing by small-scale farmers in the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses case study research methods to an analysis of the sector ' s recent history combined with an empirical account of systems thinking on integrating technology supply chains and commodity supply chains.

Findings

Findings suggest that the case of mango production and post-harvest in the Krishna district is a dismal one and the remedial actions to strengthen mango innovation systems in the district relate to aspects of capacity development to promote upward spiral of learning and innovation, and involve multistakeholder processes to integrate the supply chains of technologyand commodity.

Originality/value

This paper, with its aim to contribute to the literature on innovation capacity development, brings together conventionally distinct bodies of literature on strengthening innovation systems and developing stakeholder capacity. The value of this paper lies on how it addresses technology supply and commodity supply issues in the analysis of competence challenges to strengthening mango innovation systems performance.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Deanna de Zilwa

Exploring a new conceptual framework for authentic followership (AF) comprised of three components: individual, dyadic and organisational. The purpose of this paper is to…

2638

Abstract

Purpose

Exploring a new conceptual framework for authentic followership (AF) comprised of three components: individual, dyadic and organisational. The purpose of this paper is to explain how the components of AF interact as a positive, non-linear feedback loop. It presents three propositions of positive outcomes arising from AF. First, AF builds follower’s strengths and capacities. Second, AF strengthens dyadic relationships between followers and leaders. Third, AF deepens and strengthens positive organisational culture thereby improving organisational performance. It discusses the practical significance of these propositions for followers, leaders and firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an overview of AF. Then three propositions of positive outcomes arising from AF are presented. It identifies how these propositions could benefit followers, leaders and firms. In conclusion, it offers suggestions for future research directions and notes some limitations of this work.

Findings

The key finding of this paper is that AF could potentially strengthen the capacities and performance of followers, leaders and organisations if the propositions presented in this work are correct – if the three components of AF interact with each other as a positive feedback loop strengthening and reinforcing each component of AF. To establish the validity of the AF model and the three propositions the paper suggests that investigations in different empirical settings are undertaken: SME’s and multinational corporations, in different countries under different market conditions, with followers and leaders of different gender, age, education level, roles and tenure of employment.

Originality/value

The paper’s core contention that the components of AF interact as a positive feedback loop has significant practical implications – beneficial outcomes for followers, leaders and firms. P1 explains how AF enables followers to gain confidence, maturity and create solid foundations from which to thrive and flourish. P2 explains how dyadic relationships between followers and leaders could be strengthened, deepening trust and respect between each party, thereby enhancing leadership effectiveness. P3 explains how the dynamic processes of AF can strengthen and deepen positive organisational culture and enhance organisational performance.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Hyogo Framework for Action and Urban Disaster Resilience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-927-0

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Roger Ayimbillah Atinga, Samuel Dery, Simon Peter Katongole and Moses Aikins

The study drew on capacity framework around the individual, organisational, health system and wider context to explore gaps in health supply chain (HSC) workers capacity

Abstract

Purpose

The study drew on capacity framework around the individual, organisational, health system and wider context to explore gaps in health supply chain (HSC) workers capacity and competency to perform supply chain (SC) functions and the lessons for workforce development.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method study was conducted across the Northern Region of Ghana. Qualitative data were collected from in-depth interviews with 34 key SC managers at the regional, district and facility levels. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered through the RedCap mobile app to 233 core HSC workers and non-core workers (clinicians with additional responsibilities in SC). Data were managed and analysed inductively and deductively for themes.

Findings

Weak knowledge and competency in SC functions attributed to poor training exposure and organisational support for capacity building, undermined the capacity to perform basic SC functions, especially by the non-core category. The policy and regulatory environment of the HSC marketplace were described as fluid and with complexity of demands. Both worker categories, therefore, requested functional, technical, managerial and customer care competencies to anticipate and manage complexities. Structural characteristics of the health system giving narrow decision space to HSC workers cascaded the capacity for innovation and initiative and promoted frustrations among mid-level managers. Infrastructural deficits and shortfalls in operational resources scaled back the capacity to efficiently manage inventory and ensure that commodities reach clients in good quality.

Originality/value

Finding suggest that capacity building of HSC workers, strengthening of health institutions structural and resource capacity, and leveraging on technology will enable optimal performance of HSC functions.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 41000