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Article

K.V. Ramani and Dileep Mavalankar

This paper aims to focus on the management capacity assessment of the Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) program at the state level.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the management capacity assessment of the Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) program at the state level.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an extensive literature survey, and discussions with senior officers in charge of RCH program at the central and state level, the authors have developed a conceptual framework for management capacity assessment. Central to their framework are a few determinants of management capacity, a set of indicators to estimate these determinants, and a management capacity assessment tool to be administered by each state. A pilot survey of the management tool in a few states helped the authors to refine each instrument and finalize the same. A suitable management structure is suggested for effective management of the RCH program based on the population in each state.

Findings

The assessment brought out the need to strengthen the planning and monitoring of RCH activities, HR management practices, and inter‐departmental coordination.

Practical implications

The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India has accepted the management tool and asked each state to administer it. The recommended management structure is used as a guideline by each state to identify the capacity gaps and take necessary steps to augment its management capacity.

Originality/value

The authors’ framework to assess the management capacity of RCH program is very comprehensive, the management tool is easy to administer, and assessment of capacity gaps can be made quickly.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Yung‐Chang Hsiao, Chung‐Jen Chen and Shao‐Chi Chang

This study aims to investigate the relationship between knowledge management capacity and organizational performance from the social interaction perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between knowledge management capacity and organizational performance from the social interaction perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study employs a questionnaire approach. The sample for this study is drawn from the population of the top 5,000 Taiwanese firms listed in the yearbook published by the China Credit Information Service Incorporation. Regression analysis is used to test the hypotheses in a sample of 105 Taiwanese firms.

Findings

The findings suggest that two assessments of knowledge management capacity, knowledge acquisition and dissemination, and the communication factor of social interaction are positively related to organizational performance. Further, social interaction has complementary or synergistic interaction effects with knowledge management capacity on organizational performance.

Practical implications

Given the need for the use of knowledge management capacity as an enabler to improve organization outcome, firms need to be aware that social interaction would moderate the link between knowledge management capacity and organizational performance. Therefore, firms should pay special attention to formulate appropriate social interaction conditions under which knowledge acquisition and dissemination are most likely to enhance organizational performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by theoretically developing a conceptual model and then empirically examining the relationships among knowledge management capacity, social interaction, and organizational performance.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article

John S. Evans

A striking feature of Jaques' work is his “no nonsense” attitude to the “manager‐subordinate” relationship. His blunt account of the origins of this relationship seems at…

Abstract

A striking feature of Jaques' work is his “no nonsense” attitude to the “manager‐subordinate” relationship. His blunt account of the origins of this relationship seems at first sight to place him in the legalistic “principles of management” camp rather than in the ranks of the subtler “people centred” schools. We shall see before long how misleading such first impressions can be, for Jaques is not making simplistic assumptions about the human psyche. But he certainly sees no point in agonising over the mechanism of association which brings organisations and work‐groups into being when the facts of life are perfectly straightforward and there is no need to be squeamish about them.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 15 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Roberto Chierici, Alice Mazzucchelli, Alexeis Garcia-Perez and Demetris Vrontis

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate how big data collected from social media contribute to knowledge management practices, innovation processes and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate how big data collected from social media contribute to knowledge management practices, innovation processes and business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used 418 questionnaires collected from firms that actively invest in marketing, advertising and communication in the Italian market. The hypotheses testing and analysis were conducted using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results reveal that customers’ data gathered from social media produce different effects on knowledge management practices and firms’ innovation capacity. Furthermore, increased innovation capacity turned out to affect customer relationship performance directly, while it contributes to gain better financial performance only when it is used to gain relational outcomes.

Originality/value

The outcomes of the study help firms to develop a clear understanding about which big data retrieved from social media can be useful to improve their knowledge management practices and enhance their innovation capacity. Moreover, by investigating the mediating role of big data knowledge management in the context of social media knowledge acquisition and innovation capacity, this study also extends the mediation variables used to understand the relationship between knowledge capabilities and practices and innovation constructs.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

J. Kiarash Sadeghi, Elisabeth Struckell, Divesh Ojha and David Nowicki

Service organization supply chains provide a context that amplifies the complexity of interorganizational interdependencies and the need to build unique capabilities and…

Abstract

Purpose

Service organization supply chains provide a context that amplifies the complexity of interorganizational interdependencies and the need to build unique capabilities and innovative solutions, especially when confronted with man-made or natural disasters. Using the lens of complex adaptive systems (CAS), this study aims to investigate the role of absorptive capacity (AC), change management capability and information quality in improving a firm’s ability to cope with disasters – disaster immunity (DI). The study uniquely parses absorptive capacity into a three-variable, second-order construct (absorptive human resource management, absorptive complementary knowledge and absorptive infrastructure).

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from 264 US service firms in a supply chain context, this paper evaluates the research model using the structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

The second-order, three-dimensional framework for AC has far superior psychometric properties as compared to the previous unidimensional conceptualizations. Results show that AC influences a firm’s DI through change management capability and information quality – two DI enhancing resources.

Originality/value

The paper builds on previous conceptual discussions of absorptive capacity as a multidimensional construct by operationalizing AC as a latent variable with three dimensions (above). Moreover, this paper shows that AC, change management capability, information quality and DI are interrelated parts of a CAS.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Frédéric Jallat and Fabio Ancarani

The purpose of this paper is to show how yield management and dynamic pricing, which originated in the airline industry, are now diffusing in other service industries. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how yield management and dynamic pricing, which originated in the airline industry, are now diffusing in other service industries. The aim is to demonstrate that these techniques can be profitably applied to telecommunications and similar sectors and to examine the particular conditions of their implementation, development and efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The main concepts of yield management, dynamic pricing and CRM are carefully scrutinized. Also discussed is the concept of natural demand curve that aims at reaching a better compromise between the capacity of a company and the demand in an environment where services cannot be sold in advance. In order to sustain the analysis and demonstrate its managerial implications, five case studies are presented that exemplify some aspects of yield management techniques in the telecommunication sector.

Findings

Since the telecommunications are undergoing a process of increased competition and dynamic convergence, yield management techniques can help telecom operators to optimize the benefits they can derive from a subtle management of information networks and partnerships. However, such an approach is more difficult to implement in the telecommunication industry than in the airlines sector because of the difficulty to control (and sometimes refuse) network access to customers.

Originality/value

Capacity and revenue management become critical differentiation factors in improving service quality, loyalty and profitability. Given the increase in competitive pressure, the main objective of operators to sell customer access database to potential partners represents a radical change in the nature of financial and information flows and leads to a “customized management of services supply”.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Isabel M. Prieto and Elena Revilla

This paper analyzes how organizations may use different knowledge management styles according to higher or lower emphasis on (1) techno‐structural initiatives for…

Abstract

This paper analyzes how organizations may use different knowledge management styles according to higher or lower emphasis on (1) techno‐structural initiatives for information processing, and (2) behavioral solutions for knowledge sharing by organizational members. As a consequence, the effects of these styles on learning capacity are also different. The empirical analysis of the present study found that knowledge management practices can be categorized into four styles: (1) passive, (2) behavioral, (3) techno‐structural, and (4) active. The active style, which implies superior management of both techno‐structural and behavioral tools of knowledge management has been the most effective in the development of learning capacity. In contrast, the passive style, which implies weak management of both kinds of knowledge management initiatives, results in lower learning capacity. Hence, this work focuses on suggesting and empirically testing a characteristic framework for how a set of knowledge management initiatives interact and influence learning capacity in organizations.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article

Colin Armistead and Graham Clark

Matching supply and demand in services by capacity management has adirect influence on the ability of the service delivery system toachieve service quality and resource…

Abstract

Matching supply and demand in services by capacity management has a direct influence on the ability of the service delivery system to achieve service quality and resource productivity targets. Examines some propositions for the influences of capacity management on quality and resource productivity and for managing capacity. In addition to the chase and level strategies for managing capacity in services suggested by Sasser a coping strategy for capacity management is described which aims to improve the overall delivery of service quality while achieving resource productivity targets. Coping is necessary for all organizations at some time. Some research results derived from the experience of a range of service organizations indicate a less than satisfactory handling of the coping situation.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article

Sanjay Kumar Prasad and Ravi Shankar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate capacity coordination in services supply chain (SSC). It provides discussion and application of various contracts in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate capacity coordination in services supply chain (SSC). It provides discussion and application of various contracts in a two-stage single period SSC.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers a two-stage serial supply chain with demand uncertainty and price insensitivity. A model is developed to represent a global IT SSC incorporating services specific factors like over-capacity cost and higher degree of substitution resulting in flexibility to meet unplanned demand. At first, centralized and competitive solutions of the model are studied. Then, the paper studies coordination in this supply chain using some of widely used contract templates.

Findings

This paper finds several key insights for the researchers and practitioners in this area around adverse impact of over-capacity cost on demand, positive effect of delivery team’s exposure to market on contracting terms and better understanding of efficient frontiers for selected contracting mechanism.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has limited its analysis to three key and most widely used contracts and made assumptions about risk-neutrality of the firms. Future research can study other contracting templates and/or relax for the model as laid out in this paper.

Practical implications

An automated software agent can be built leveraging the closed form equations developed here to help decide on optimal capacity investment and devise coordinating contracts.

Originality/value

This paper established that because of higher degree of substitution, perishability and non-trivial over-capacity cost, SSC behave bit differently than the physical goods supply chain and coordination of participating firms needs to be studied in a services specific context for improving system-wide performance.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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