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Article

Noel Carroll and Markus Helfert

Open innovation is an emerging paradigm which exposes organisations to networked capabilities and competencies though collaboration relationships. The traditional view of…

Abstract

Purpose

Open innovation is an emerging paradigm which exposes organisations to networked capabilities and competencies though collaboration relationships. The traditional view of the organisational environment raises concerns regarding the mismatch in the methods used to assess business value and understanding service process maturity. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a systematic literature review to present a state-of-the-art literature review with particular focus on the applicability of capability maturity models (CMM) within an open innovation context.

Findings

The authors present a conceptual account of our research developments and build on the state-of-the-art which bridges open innovation and CMM. The authors provide a comprehensive discussion on the literature and challenge the applicability of individual organisations evolving through maturity stages. The authors identify a significant gap in the emergence of open innovation and CMM and present a service capability sourcing model (SCSM) to bridge these two research areas.

Practical implications

Unpacking the nature of service capabilities allows us to understand the primary components of value co-creation and their contribution towards service maturity within an open service innovation environment. The authors verify the explanation model using a cloud computing scenario within an open service innovation environment.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is an explanation model of an open service innovation environment through our SCSM. Though an open innovation perspective, the authors examine the nature of service capabilities and the suitability of traditional CMM in a modern service context.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article

Patricia Williams

The manner in which information is used and communicated in the medical environment has been revolutionized by the introduction of electronic storage, manipulation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The manner in which information is used and communicated in the medical environment has been revolutionized by the introduction of electronic storage, manipulation and communication of information. This change has brought with it many challenges in information security. This research seeks to propose a practical application, the capability maturity model (CMM), to meet the needs of medical information security practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on previous work by the author using the Tactical Information Governance for Security model developed for the medical setting. An essential element of this model is the ability to assess current capability of a practice to meet the needs of security and to identify how improvements can be made. Existing CMM models are reviewed to inform construction of an operational framework for capability assessment.

Findings

An operational capability framework for assessing security capability in medical practice, based on CMM principles, is presented. An example of the use of this framework is modelled using backup to provide proof of concept.

Practical implications

In an environment that is reliant on doctors and non‐technical staff to implement security, an operational framework to improve practice though capability evaluation is needed. The framework presents activities in simple, non‐technical terms and separates these activities into discrete sections resulting in improvement that can be easily managed and implemented.

Originality/value

The operational framework developed demonstrates how practical security practice improvement can be achieved in a medical environment, whilst meeting strategic objectives, best practice and external validation. This paper develops this process through exploration and application of existing CMMs.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article

Robert Eadie, Srinath Perera and George Heaney

Two main types of models are used worldwide in consideration of the impact of Information Communication Technology (ICT) processes in construction: capability maturity

Abstract

Purpose

Two main types of models are used worldwide in consideration of the impact of Information Communication Technology (ICT) processes in construction: capability maturity models (CMM) and e‐readiness models. The purpose of this paper is to review the structure behind the different models, their applicability to construction and indicate how organisations move between the levels in a CMM.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates the literature behind eight e‐readiness models and 53 CMMs.

Findings

The findings indicate 88 per cent of maturity‐based CMM models linked to five maturity levels, with the remainder using four. CMMs have common features: the process/application is described by maturity levels; Key Process Areas (KPA) provide the features to allow movement; and the levels are arranged and attained systematically, lowest to highest. Publication dates and trends indicate the rate of CMM publication is increasing (most in 2009), conversely, e‐readiness models are not (most published in 2004).

Practical implications

It is expected that the number of CMMs will increase; conversely, e‐readiness models may not. E‐readiness models have not been adopted by other industries and applications. However, CMMs, although initiated in software engineering, have progressed to incorporate construction models which cover processes as diverse as financial management and documentation. This suggests that a CMM is more applicable for applications such as e‐business in construction.

Originality/value

The paper significantly expands that of Man in 2007 who listed 22 CMM models. This paper categorises a further 31 models and indicates construction applicability, combined with a review of e‐readiness models for the first time.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

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Article

Neda Khatibian, Tahmoores Hasan gholoi pour and Hasan Abedi Jafari

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for measuring knowledge management maturity level in organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for measuring knowledge management maturity level in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper defines and extracts effective factors and indicators on knowledge management and proposes a schema for prioritizing and specifying the weight of each factor and variable. The paper further surveys and evaluates existing knowledge management models and presents a knowledge management maturity model with defined factors and variables.

Findings

Defining and extracting 8 factors and 42 variables that affect knowledge management and subsequently developing a knowledge management maturity model. The model of this study is practical and helps to determine the maturity position of an organization in knowledge management by defining existing status of in factors and variables, and from the prioritization of factors and variables enabling the organization to optimize its profile.

Research limitations/implications

For increasing generalization of model, future should utilize other organizations in diverse industries.

Originality/value

The base model of this research is CMMI instead of CMM and instead of KPAs we use CSFs and for measuring maturity position of organization using a questionnaire. This research model can be utilized as an alternative model in comparison to existing models.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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Article

John Hinks

The scope for using dedicated facilities management information technology to stimulate advancements in facilities management (FM) is discussed. The concept is put forward…

Abstract

The scope for using dedicated facilities management information technology to stimulate advancements in facilities management (FM) is discussed. The concept is put forward that a synergistic interaction occurs between the process of FM and the specialist information technology (IT) used for FM. This co‐operation can produce co‐maturation or co‐stagnation of their capability. The mechanism of this interaction between specialist FM IT and the FM process appears to be dependent on the relative capabilities of the process and the IT. This paper presents a conceptual framework for describing the relationship between the FM process and FM IT, and a model for the dynamic mechanisms of their co‐operation. The paper commences by reviewing work done on modelling process capability for software procurement and the design and construction process, using the established capability maturity modelling (CMM) technique. The generalised principles of an existing model for the dynamic interaction between the design and construction process for buildings and specialist construction IT are discussed. The paper then considers their application and extension into the context of FM. The specific example of growth in specialist FM IT and FM process is examined for the case of space management. Finally, the implications of co‐maturation for FM IT and the FM process are explored.

Details

Facilities, vol. 16 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article

Mana Patamakajonpong and Tirapot Chandarasupsang

This paper aims to present an alternative practical framework to classify the skill and knowledge of the individual trainees by comparing it with the expert in an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an alternative practical framework to classify the skill and knowledge of the individual trainees by comparing it with the expert in an organization. This framework gives the benefit to the organization in order to know the ability level of the personnel and to be able to provide the personnel development method both in academic learning and workplace learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This research develops the framework based on relevant methodologies. Competency-Based Development is applied to investigate the knowledge and skill of the specific task. Knowledge Engineering is used to capture the experiences and construct knowledge model from relevance parties. Capability Maturity Model is then adapted to develop the capability and maturity level of the personnel. It can then be used to cluster the knowledge and skill. Finally, the Substation Maintenance Department of Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA), Thailand, is selected as a case study to test the proposed framework.

Findings

The results have shown that the proposed framework can be utilized to identify the capability level of the individual personnel. Furthermore, the appropriate maturity development of the employees in each level can also be identified. This proposed framework provides better results when comparing to the current PEA competency model, as the criteria in this framework are systematically derived from experts rather than relying solely on the proficiency level. Although, this framework was tested with the switchgear maintenance task, the results and its systematic approach have indicated that it can also be used to develop the capability maturity model for other fields of work.

Originality/value

The main originality of this research is the proposed competency analysis table, which integrates human resource development with knowledge management, risks management and management information system. Rather than performing these tasks separately for continuous quality improvement, organization can practically plan and perform the quality improvement-related tasks spontaneously. Moreover, the application of the capability maturity model to classify knowledge and skill of the maintenance tasks into maturity level is another academic value presented in this paper. The proposed framework gives the benefit to organization to classify the capability of the personnel. This is potentially beneficial to the human resource development personnel than traditional methods in the sense that it provides the information on how to develop the specific skill of the employees.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article

Robert Eadie, Srinath Perera and George Heaney

The purpose of this paper is to report the production of the key process areas (KPAs) for an e‐capability maturity model for construction organisations, based on drivers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the production of the key process areas (KPAs) for an e‐capability maturity model for construction organisations, based on drivers and barriers to e‐procurement.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous researchers have recognised the positive consequences of possessing a model to sustain the embedment of any business process within an organisation. The capability maturity model progressed into one of the most internationally recognised since the release of the Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM) in 1991. Since then, many CMMs have been developed. This paper reports on how a CMM based on drivers and barriers to e‐procurement identified in Eadie et al. can be developed to form the KPAs in the formation of a model to gauge the maturity of an organisation in relation to e‐procurement.

Findings

It was found that factor analysis could be used as a data reduction technique to reduce the 20 drivers and 32 barriers identified as being applicable to e‐procurement in construction, to 12 KPAs: Quality management system; Cost management system; Intergroup coordination; Time management system; Operational analysis; Organisational change management system; Integrated teaming; Governance management system; Requirements development; Knowledge management system; Integration management system; and Organisational environment.

Originality/value

This paper provides particulars of a research project which uses factor analysis to produce a set of KPAs from the drivers and barriers identified in Eadie et al. These KPAs are then subjected to a mapping process linking them to maturity levels to develop a CMM to analyse the e‐procurement capability of construction organisations. This mapping will be reported in a later paper. This e‐readiness of organisations will indicate the current state of a construction organisation in terms of its readiness to carry out e‐procurement. The paper describes in detail the identification of the KPAs.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

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Article

Mikko Siponen

Traditionally, information security management standards listing generic means of protection have received a lot of attention in the field of information security…

Abstract

Traditionally, information security management standards listing generic means of protection have received a lot of attention in the field of information security management. In the background a few information security management‐oriented maturity criteria have been laid down. These criteria can be regarded as the latest promising innovations on the information security checklist‐standard family tree. Whereas information security maturity criteria have so far received inadequate attention in information security circles, software maturity endeavours have been the focus of constructive debate in software engineering circles. Aims to analyze what the alternative maturity criteria for developing secure information systems (IS) and software can learn from these debates on software engineering maturity criteria. First, advances a framework synthesized from the information systems (IS) and software engineering literatures, including six lessons that information security maturity criteria can learn from. Second, pores over the existing information security maturity criteria in the light of this framework. Third, presents, on the basis of results of this analysis, implications for practice and research.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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Article

Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Srinath Perera and Lei Zhou

The purpose of this study is to use critical success factors (CSFs) to develop a process maturity and determine the current maturity levels of stakeholder organisations in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to use critical success factors (CSFs) to develop a process maturity and determine the current maturity levels of stakeholder organisations in public–private partnership (PPP) project implementation in Nigeria. The success of any PPP project is largely dependent on the country’s maturity on CSFs that made PPP projects successful. Thus, the identification of metrics and standards for measuring the maturity of stakeholder organisations on CSFs for PPP project implementation remains a challenge.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted literature review and six PPP project case studies including interviews in each case study and expert forum. The outcome of a comprehensive literature review provides a total list of 14 CSFs that made PPP projects successful in Nigeria. These CSFs were used for capability maturity levels ' definition ranging from level 1 (Ad hoc) to level 5 (Optimising) in line with capability maturity model concept. Quantitative assessment was considered as a support tool for making an overall assessment of both the public and private organisations ' current capability maturity levels and for comparison approach.

Findings

A capability enhancement framework for stakeholder organisations in PPP project was developed. This framework was used in assessing the current capability maturity levels of stakeholder organisations involved in PPP projects in Nigeria. Using this framework, it was found that public sector organisations were positioned between maturity level 1 and maturity level 2 (out of five maturity levels) on CSFs applicable to them. While, most private sector organisations were placed in maturity level 2 on CSFs associated with them.

Practical implications

The results emanated from this study provided both the theoretical and practical implications. The theoretical implication provides new insights into the usefulness of CSFs in PPP projects and indicates that merely identifying possible CSFs for PPP projects is not sufficient. The practical implication shows that the framework developed in this study had provided the benchmark for the identification of methodical approach, and standard to process improvement in PPP infrastructure projects, which can be replicated in both the developed and developing countries. Thus, the framework could be used to benchmark future studies.

Originality/value

The framework would provide a useful guide and roadmaps for improvement by indicating “what” needs to be done by stakeholder organisations involved in PPP projects in achieving higher capability maturity levels on identified CSFs for PPP projects in Nigeria and developing countries at large.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article

Milad Shams Zare, Reza Tahmasebi and Hamidreza Yazdani

The purpose of this paper is to assess the maturity of human resource management (HRM) processes of the Sazehgostar Co. based on human resource (HR) process survey tool…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the maturity of human resource management (HRM) processes of the Sazehgostar Co. based on human resource (HR) process survey tool (PST) and provide solutions for them.

Design/methodology/approach

The HR PST was adopted as the reference model. Data were collected through interviews with HR experts and reviewing organisational documents. A scoring system (based on RADAR logic) is introduced to score the interviews and documents.

Findings

Each element of HR PST consists of ten maturity levels. The results of the assessment showed that the overall average of the organisation’s HRM processes maturity is at level 2. The process of data management and HR systems with a score of five received the highest score, and the organisational capability development, talent management and rewards and recognition processes with a score of 1 received the lowest score.

Practical implications

These findings enable management and HR management to measure the quality of HR processes and help them to prioritise development actions.

Originality/value

The existing literature does not present empirical research in the field of the maturity of HRM. Also, the analysis method used in this study will help organisations to perform self-assessment and determine the maturity of their processes.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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