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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Kostas Skliamis and Dirk J. Korf

The purpose of this paper is to: describe and contextualize the aims and distinctive and common characteristics of cannabis festivals in countries with different cannabis

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: describe and contextualize the aims and distinctive and common characteristics of cannabis festivals in countries with different cannabis policies; assess characteristics of participants; identify reasons to attend cannabis festivals; explore to which extent cannabis festivals contribute to the social and cultural acceptance of cannabis, as perceived by attendees.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach incorporates three methods of data collection in the research design; quantitative research among 1,355 participants, participant observation and interviews with the organizers.

Findings

Cannabis festivals in Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome and Athens have common features but also maintain and reproduce local, social and cultural characteristics. Cannabis festivals, as well as their attendees, represent heterogeneous categories. The style of the festival – music festival or march combined with music – affects the main reason for attendance by the participants. In cannabis festivals more similar to music festivals the majority of the respondents attended for entertainment while at the cannabis festivals in the form of a march combined with music the majority attended for protest. Furthermore, increasing age, residency and the high frequency of cannabis use are factors that led the participants to attend for protest.

Originality/value

The research on cannabis festivals is limited. This paper not only explores the aims of cannabis festivals in four capital cities of Europe and the characteristics of their attendees including motivations, but also offers interesting insights for understanding the ways in which political and social constructions like cannabis festivals shape attitudes, perception and behaviors around cannabis use.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Daniel William Mackenzie Wright

The purpose of this paper is to offer original ideas into a potential future cannabis industry in the UK. This paper presents novel approaches regarding the potential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer original ideas into a potential future cannabis industry in the UK. This paper presents novel approaches regarding the potential existence of cannabis for the tourism industry. It presents an idea in which the UK Government could produce, distribute and control the industry. The proposed idea presents a scheme in which the UK could encourage regional tourism (inclusive to domestic and international travellers) through a controlled but innovative cannabis market scheme. This paper presents a future scenario aiming to encourage dialogue and critique, at a time when attitudes to cannabis are changing.

Design/methodology/approach

This research takes a scenario narrative approach in presenting and exploring a potential future cannabis market in the UK. The importance of narrative writing as a method is recognised by Lindgren and Bandhold (2009), who identify the significance in telling a story to the reader. Taking a pragmatic approach, embracing diverse philosophical methods, this research explores past and current trends via a mixture of secondary data sources to create and present a scenario narrative of the future.

Findings

This paper identified that trends in legalising cannabis for cultivation, medical and recreational purposes continue to become more liberal globally. However, cannabis laws mainly focus on the use for residents. Consequently, domestic tourism markets have the potential to grow. However, there is limited consideration regarding the potential for international tourism cannabis markets. Thus, the findings of this research are based on the potential for the UK to implement and promote a cannabis industry for international travellers.

Originality/value

This paper offers original ideas in exploring a future cannabis market in the UK, one where regional tourism is considered. The paper presents a novel approach that encourages domestic and international tourists to engage with the cannabis industry by navigating a well-managed, local approach to supplying cannabis in the UK.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Pekka Hakkarainen

The purpose of this paper is to study vaporizers – especially the vape pen – as a new technology in cannabis use. Until now, almost all information on the use of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study vaporizers – especially the vape pen – as a new technology in cannabis use. Until now, almost all information on the use of vaporizers or e-cigarettes for cannabis consumption has come from the internet, the popular press, and accounts by users, but not from the scientific literature. More research is needed.

Design/methodology/approach

Since scientific studies of the phenomenon are virtually non-existent, the author will also base his study on sociological reflections upon internet sites and articles published both in subcultural and mainstream media. The author will document a national estimate of the prevalence of vaping based on a recent population survey in Finland.

Findings

Vaping is an emerging trend in cannabis culture internationally. It has been seen as a healthier route of administration than traditional ways of smoking cannabis. Other images, created especially with the help of advanced high-tech machinery and stylish and fashionable designs for the vape pen, are aiming at being cool and easy to use. In Finland, 6 percent of cannabis users make regular use of a vaporizer, and around a quarter of users use one occasionally. A vape pen or e-cigarette was regularly used by 2.6 percent and occasionally by 9.1 percent of cannabis users.

Originality/value

The trend of increasing vaping and the use of new devices has not been properly recognized among researchers. The paper presents some original results from a national population survey.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Soo K. Kang and Jaeseok Lee

The present study aimed at classifying cannabis festival attendees based on their motivation and travel activities, profiling the resultant latent groups with demographic…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aimed at classifying cannabis festival attendees based on their motivation and travel activities, profiling the resultant latent groups with demographic and travel characteristics and examining the association between the groups.

Design/methodology/approach

With a quantitative-exploratory approach, this study collected 392 out-of-state visitors' responses to a cannabis festival in Denver, Colorado and classified them according to their motivation and activity participation. Using the classification results, the study profiled the festival visitors based on their demographic and travel characteristics. Latent class analysis, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and cross-tabulation were employed.

Findings

The results revealed that festival visitors were categorized into four latent groups by motivation and three latent groups by travel activity participation. Regarding motivation, the cannabis seekers (relatively young, White/Caucasian and residents in liberal states) and multi-purpose seekers (relatively young, Black/African American and residents in conservative states) were strongly motivated by cannabis-related factors. For travel activity participation, moderate participants were more likely to be first-time visitors, whereas active and passive participants were classified as repeat visitors.

Originality/value

The current study filled the research gap in the quantitative exploration of cannabis tourism industry in general and cannabis festival segment specifically. The findings contribute to (1) better understanding of out-of-state visitors' motivation and travel behaviors while attending a cannabis themed festival and (2) serving as a seminal work in the context of cannabis tourism literature since the recreational cannabis legalization in the United States.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2020

Nicolae Eduard Craciunescu

The purpose of this study is to explore drug consumption from a cultural perspective, in the context of the consumer culture. It aims to identify if, through the branding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore drug consumption from a cultural perspective, in the context of the consumer culture. It aims to identify if, through the branding process, cryptomarket vendors are attaching a sign-value to their products to facilitate the process by which consumers will recognize and appreciate it.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was done by performing a qualitative content analysis loosely inspired from semiotics on a sample of 40 seller pages from the Dream Market and samples of their listings, collected in 2018. The vendors who had over 1,000 successful transactions were selected, as they were considered to be the ones who have gained a certain level of trust on the cryptomarket and were considered to having to compete by differentiating their services through their brands of choice.

Findings

The results have shown that the sign-value attached to the drugs sold by the vendors from this sample can be divided in two different types of sign-systems: the popular culture and the drug cultures. The popular culture includes sign-value borrowed from established brands, popular media and media representations of crime worlds. The drug cultures include values from three types of subcultural systems: cannabis, party and psychonaut subculture.

Originality/value

The study is trying to stir the discussions around the regulation of the drug markets by looking at the market forces within them as rather a product of consumer capitalism and not as processes that happen outside the postmodern cultural and societal trends.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Peter Cohen

From a paper given at the Tweelanden conferentie Cannabisteelt in de Lage Landen, at the University of Ghent, on 3‐4 December 2007, the author explores the culture of the…

Abstract

From a paper given at the Tweelanden conferentie Cannabisteelt in de Lage Landen, at the University of Ghent, on 3‐4 December 2007, the author explores the culture of the ban on cannabis and defines its goals.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Deborah M. McPhee and Francine Schlosser

In October 2018, the Canadian federal government legalized the use of recreational cannabis with a goal to drastically diminish the black-market and the use of cannabis by…

Abstract

In October 2018, the Canadian federal government legalized the use of recreational cannabis with a goal to drastically diminish the black-market and the use of cannabis by minors. The attraction of talent to the new industry has been recognized as important to long-term industry success, but there exists a paradox in talent attraction. Key talent must first be screened by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Anyone with serious criminal charges in the past may not be cleared to work in the industry, blocking out experienced cannabis talent. Additionally, some potential talent may not be interested in working the legitimized industry although others may welcome the opportunity to work in it. HR managers have a rare opportunity to be trailblazers by establishing the norms for the industry. Their role should be established in the boardroom, but they will have to demonstrate their value through their ability to build talent in an industry made up largely of SMEs. We use a nested model of macro and micro TM perspectives to analyze the context of this industry. At the macro level we investigate how legalization, government regulation, legitimacy, and reputation affect TM within the micro level context. We suggest how HRM strategies related to attraction, development and retention can impact TM. The integration of the macro and micro level context of TM is paramount to the survival of the new legalized cannabis industry.

Details

Managing Talent: A Critical Appreciation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-094-3

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Monica J. Barratt, Martin Bouchard, Tom Decorte, Vibeke Asmussen Frank, Pekka Hakkarainen, Simon Lenton, Aili Malm, Holly Nguyen and Gary R. Potter

Unlike other plant‐based drugs, cannabis is increasingly grown within the country of consumption, requires minimal processing before consumption, and can be easily grown…

Abstract

Purpose

Unlike other plant‐based drugs, cannabis is increasingly grown within the country of consumption, requires minimal processing before consumption, and can be easily grown almost anywhere using indoor or outdoor cultivation techniques. Developments in agronomic technologies have led to global growth in domestic cultivation, both by cannabis users for self‐ and social‐supply, and by more commercially‐oriented growers. Cross‐national research is needed to better understand who is involved in domestic cultivation, the diversity in cultivation practices and motivations, and cultivators' interaction with the criminal justice system and cannabis control policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The article introduces the Global Cannabis Cultivation Research Consortium (GCCRC), describes its evolution and aims, and outlines the methodology of its ongoing cross‐national online survey of cannabis cultivation.

Findings

Despite differing national contexts, the GCCRC successfully developed a core questionnaire to be used in different countries. It accommodates varying research interests through the addition of optional survey sections. The benefits to forming an international consortium to conduct web‐based survey research include the sharing of expertise, recruitment efforts and problem‐solving.

Research limitations/implications

The article discusses the limitations of using non‐representative online sampling and the strategies used to increase validity.

Originality/value

The GCCRC is conducting the largest cross‐national study of domestic cannabis cultivation to date. The aim is not only to better understand patterns of cannabis cultivation and how they differ between countries but also to build upon online engagement methodology with hidden populations.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Melissa Bone, Gary Potter and Axel Klein

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on Illicit Cannabis Cultivation in a Time of Policy Change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on Illicit Cannabis Cultivation in a Time of Policy Change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews some of the different adaptations made by cannabis growers in countries where cannabis has not been legalised.

Findings

Cannabis growers are adjusting to different legal settings by focusing on home production. Participation in cultivation is a crime, but can also be activism: an effort to change the law. Medical use of cannabis is a particularly important driver here. Having to break the law to alleviate symptoms and treat illnesses provides both a greater sense of urgency and a level of sympathy not usually granted to illicit drug users.

Practical implications

Grass-roots advocacy may drive policy change.

Originality/value

This is an original assessment of current state of knowledge on cannabis cultivation in countries where cannabis cultivation remains restricted.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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