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Expert briefing
Publication date: 16 August 2018

Cannabis legalisation in Canada.

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB236863

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Sandra C. Jones and John R. Rossiter

This paper examines the believability of strong warnings about the negative consequences of drug use among young adults in Australia who have never tried, currently use…

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Abstract

This paper examines the believability of strong warnings about the negative consequences of drug use among young adults in Australia who have never tried, currently use, or have tried and rejected cannabis. It finds that the strong warnings about cannabis are generally believed by never‐triers. The same warnings are perceived by current users as only slightly believable. Surprisingly, but also consistent with cognitive dissonance, trier‐rejecters of cannabis are the most likely, more so even than never‐triers, to believe the warnings about cannabis. The paper also examines warnings about cocaine and heroin by cannabis usage status. Current users of cannabis, compared with non‐users, perceive the warnings about the harmful effects of cocaine as less believable, suggesting possible “gateway” susceptibility to trial of this drug. But for heroin, all groups perceive the warnings very believable. The beliefs about particular negative consequences that are most likely to lead to discontinuation of use of cannabis, and those that should discourage uptake of cocaine and heroin, are identified.

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Health Education, vol. 104 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Jan Copeland

Despite being the most common illicit drug in the Western world, treatment for cannabis use is not readily available. Primary health care and even specialist drug…

Abstract

Despite being the most common illicit drug in the Western world, treatment for cannabis use is not readily available. Primary health care and even specialist drug treatment services have often under‐recognised, and undertreated, cannabis‐related problems. Australian researcher Jan Copeland is one of the few people to test cannabis treatment models. Here she outlines the most effective models for treating cannabis and how they can be applied to other services.

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Margaret Melrose

This article is based on a study of 100 young people who were regular marijuana users, which aimed to discover the impact of their drug use on key life transitions. The…

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133

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This article is based on a study of 100 young people who were regular marijuana users, which aimed to discover the impact of their drug use on key life transitions. The article identifies the implications for practitioners who work with these young people.

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Safer Communities, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

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211

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Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

Charlotte Walsh

This paper considers the findings of the Beckley Foundation's Global Cannabis Commission Report (Room et al, 2008), an overview of the scientific literature on cannabis

Abstract

This paper considers the findings of the Beckley Foundation's Global Cannabis Commission Report (Room et al, 2008), an overview of the scientific literature on cannabis, detailing its potential harms and those caused by its prohibition. It moves on to consider the various strategies that different jurisdictions have adopted to deal with cannabis use, before moving beyond the Conventions, arguing that countries should have more autonomy to develop policy best suited to their individual circumstances.Cannabis was incorporated into the global prohibitive regime via the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961 (United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime, 1961), and is further affected by two later drug Conventions, the Convention on Psychotropic Substances 1972 (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 1972) and the Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychoactive Substances 1988 (United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime, 1988). Together, these require that all signatories make production, commerce and possession of cannabis criminal offences under domestic law: in the UK, this expectation is effected via the inclusion of cannabis in Schedule 2 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (HM Government, 1971). In the half century since the initial Convention was drafted, patterns of cannabis consumption have altered fundamentally; smoking cannabis has transformed from a relatively rare behaviour confined to a scattering of countries and cultures, to almost a rite of passage among young people in many nations. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (2009) estimates that there is a global population of 190 million cannabis users, rendering it by far the most widely used illicit drug, yet, paradoxically, one that is rarely mentioned in international drug control policy discussions.

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Marcus Day

The purpose of this paper is to present evidence of the therapeutic value of cannabis as a harm reduction intervention with people who smoke crack cocaine.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present evidence of the therapeutic value of cannabis as a harm reduction intervention with people who smoke crack cocaine.

Design/methodology/approach

A desk study of published peer-reviewed material supporting the use of cannabis as therapeutic in mitigating some of the harms associated with crack cocaine smoking.

Findings

The use of cannabis as a harm reduction strategy for crack cocaine use has been commented on in the scientific literature since the 1980s. The officially scheduling of cannabis as having no medicinal value hampered further study despite the reporting of positive findings and numerous calls for more research.

Practical implications

There are currently no approved pharmaceutical substitutions for crack cocaine. Cannabis has shown itself effective in mitigating harms for 30–40 per cent of people. Cannabis is inexpensive and readily available and should be allowed for those people who want to use it.

Originality/value

Poly drug use is often framed in a negative context. In this paper, the author shows that with cannabis and crack, the poly drug use is actually a valid harm reduction strategy.

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2018

Franjo Grotenhermen

The purpose of this paper is to give a review on the developments leading to the 2017 law on the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids in Germany, and to present the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give a review on the developments leading to the 2017 law on the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids in Germany, and to present the major advances arising from this law for the supply of patients with cannabis-based drugs and its major limitations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used an Analysis of the major political statements and documents as well as court decisions of the past 20 years, which can be regarded as the major steps of this development.

Findings

Since 1998, when dronabinol/THC was made available in Germany on prescription there have been continuous improvements of the access to cannabis-based medicines. The law of 2017, which made cannabis flowers available to patients on a doctor’s prescription and forced health insurers to pay for a treatment under certain circumstances was a major step. However, many patients, who profit from a treatment with cannabis still do not get access.

Originality/value

The German law on the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids of 2017 is unique in its kind in the world. Compared to the legal framework in other countries it has several disadvantages, for example with regard to the high prices of cannabis flowers (€20-€25 per gram), and several advantages, for example with regard to the role of health insurers.

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Tiggey May, Martin Duffy and Mike Hough

In the first study of its kind, researchers from King's College expose the consequences of reclassifying cannabis. Just how much time have the police saved, what does the…

Abstract

In the first study of its kind, researchers from King's College expose the consequences of reclassifying cannabis. Just how much time have the police saved, what does the Bobby on the beat think about the change, and what would be the consequences if it were put back to Class B?

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Alana Griffith, Mahalia Jackman and Peter Wickham

Public support for various policy options for managing cannabis in the Caribbean and the characteristics of those most likely to support specific policy options remains…

Abstract

Purpose

Public support for various policy options for managing cannabis in the Caribbean and the characteristics of those most likely to support specific policy options remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of age, sex and employment status on the public attitudes towards the full legalisation of cannabis, partial legalisation (that is for medical or religious purposes) or its continued prohibition.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data collected from nationally representative public opinion polls conducted by Caribbean Research and Development Services from 2016–2018, this paper compares the public attitudes towards cannabis in Barbados, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, Antigua and Barbuda and Dominica using a multinomial logistic model.

Findings

Support for the continued prohibition, legalisation or partial legalisation of cannabis varied significantly by age, employment status and country of residence. Women, people over 51 years of age and the employed were more likely to support full prohibition. Attitudes towards cannabis policy in the Caribbean are by no means homogenous, neither are the policy shifts occurring across the region, with some of these changes occurring slowly and not necessarily reflective of cultural dynamics.

Originality/value

This study is unique in its cross-country analysis in the Caribbean and providing valuable insight into the levels public support for cannabis legalisation. Its findings can help shape targeted public education in these countries.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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