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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2022

Achutha Jois and Somnath Chakrabarti

The education services sector faces ever-changing global market dynamics with creative disruptions. Building knowledge brands can push the higher education sector beyond…

Abstract

Purpose

The education services sector faces ever-changing global market dynamics with creative disruptions. Building knowledge brands can push the higher education sector beyond its geographical boundaries into the global arena. This study aims to identify key constructs, their theoretical background and dimensions that aid in building a global knowledge brand. The authors' research focuses on adapting and validating scales for global knowledge and education services brands from well-established academic literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have adopted a mixed methodology approach and a systematic literature review. Authors interviewed 18 subject matter experts as part of content and face validity to arrive at select constructs, dimensions and items. Quantitative methods with random sampling were adopted as the primary methodology. Initially, the survey was administered to 390 students to test preliminary results. The survey was also administered to 5,112 students at a later part of this study. Valid responses stood at 3,244 with a 63% response rate. Further, the authors conducted confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to test the reliability and validity of scales. This study analyzed composite reliability, convergent validity and discriminant validity to finalize items for scales. The authors also validated the hypotheses based on the discriminant validity assessment scores.

Findings

Authors' key research findings are that academic stimulus, campus infrastructure and student intent play a significant role in campus culture and events design and experience at campus. Authors were able to bring out 16 key constructs and 55 critical dimensions vital to global education services brand building. This study also adapted and validated 99 items that meet construct validity and composite reliability criteria. This study also highlights that constructs such as student intent, academic stimulus, campus infrastructure scalability, selection mechanism, pedagogical content knowledge, brand identity, events experience and campus culture play a vital role in global brand recognition.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' work is fairly generalizable to education services and the higher education sector. However, this study must be extrapolated and empirically validated in other industry sectors. The research implications of this study are that it aided the authors in building theoretical background for student brand loyalty theory, student expectation theory and study loyalty theory. This study adds to the body of knowledge by contributing to theoretical concepts on students, knowledge culture, events, infrastructure and branding. Researchers can adopt the scales proposed in this study to build research models in higher education branding. This study acts as a catalyst for building theories in education services areas. Researchers can delve deep into proposed research aspects of campus infrastructure, knowledge infrastructure, campus knowledge culture, events design and events experience.

Practical implications

This study aids educators and brand managers to develop global education services and optimize their effort and budget. Administrators in the education services sector must focus on practical aspects of student perception, campus infrastructure, culture and events experience. Practically administrators can reorient their efforts based on this study to achieve global brand recognition.

Social implications

This study highlights that students are not customers but are co-creators of value in the education sector. This study provides scales and dimensions needed to build co-creation frameworks and models.

Originality/value

Most research in higher education branding has not covered wider aspects of global brand building. Existing theories proposed in higher education and education services articles cover only narrower aspects of campus infrastructure, culture, events design and branding. This study presents a comprehensive list of critical factors that play a vital role in global knowledge brand building. This study highlights the constructs and scales integral to building a global education services brand.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Susan Clayton

Provides insight into one university library's experience in delivering library instruction to off‐campus students in the School of Business and the School of Education…

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Abstract

Provides insight into one university library's experience in delivering library instruction to off‐campus students in the School of Business and the School of Education while also exploring such issues as library instruction for graduate students, face‐to‐face instruction at off‐campus centers, uses of technology, faculty interaction, student needs, and librarian logistics. Examines the literature on this topic, to: review the current services offered to off‐campus students, review how the off‐campus library instruction takes place, discuss developments for the future, and present recommendations for improving the service. Finds that, at the University of Redlands, off‐campus library services are experiencing a time of growth. A goal of the library and the University to provide personalized library instruction to graduate students is gradually being realized. The off‐campus students are beginning to receive services equal to library services received by on‐campus students. Proposes that this study could be used to assist other colleges and universities in developing a program for library instruction for off‐campus students.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Max L. Bromley and Brian A. Reaves

At present there is little comparative information available regarding campus and municipal police agencies and their personnel. Therefore, the purpose of the present…

978

Abstract

At present there is little comparative information available regarding campus and municipal police agencies and their personnel. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to examine the similarities and differences between municipal and campus police agencies with respect to various human resource characteristics and policies. The following research question guided the analysis: how do municipal and campus police agencies compare regarding the following human resource characteristics and policies: the proportion of sworn personnel, gender and race of sworn officers, salaries and benefits, educational requirements, levels of training required, drug testing policies and the extent of collective bargaining/unionization. The database is nationwide in scope. The findings of this study support the general notion that city and campus police departments are similar at least with respect to the human resource characteristics identified. Many campus departments have advanced well beyond the watchman era of campus policing. In a number of human resource areas such as use of civilians, education and training requirements, the campus police have progressed very well based on the comparisons made.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Hal Mendelsohn

The Campus Connections Program can help provide other universities with a better method to reach out to students so they can learn what resources are available to them on…

Abstract

Purpose

The Campus Connections Program can help provide other universities with a better method to reach out to students so they can learn what resources are available to them on their university campus. This paper aims to examine how it does this.

Design/methodology/approach

An investigation was performed to find out what services were on the University of Central Florida's campus. Determining that many of the necessary resources were not being promoted to the students, the Campus Connections Program was developed. A review of relevant literature highlighted the point that partnerships/working relationships are important to perform successful outreach to those you wish to contact.

Findings

Through a survey instrument, it was concluded that a better way of reaching out to students was necessary. There are other outlets used to promote an organization's services, the difference shows that the Campus Connections Program provided a better forum for the exchange of information.

Research limitations/implications

A survey of nine questions was administered to representatives who participated in the Campus Connections Program. The survey sought to determine if the established method of reaching out to students was useful.

Originality/value

Student orientations are the normal route groups take to meet students and discuss their services. Providing the time and location within the library for those same groups to meet the students individually, is what makes the Campus Connections Program unique.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 July 2014

Matthew Little and Eugene Cordero

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between hybrid classes (where a per cent of the class meetings are online) and transportation-related CO2 emissions at a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between hybrid classes (where a per cent of the class meetings are online) and transportation-related CO2 emissions at a commuter campus similar to San José State University (SJSU).

Design/methodology/approach

A computer model was developed to calculate the number of trips to campus for a student body similar to SJSU. Different scenarios considered the theoretical effectiveness of implementing a hybrid course system to reduce CO2 emissions.

Findings

Increases in hybrid courses resulted in decreased student trips to campus and associated CO2 emissions. The utility of such a relationship is demonstrated through a case study where the required increase in online class meetings needed to eliminate the need for an overflow parking lot is studied. Finally, preferential scheduling of online meetings can further reduce trips to campus.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the model is that student schedules are random. Future research could use actual student schedules to better model how online course delivery will affect trips to campus.

Practical implications

As today’s universities struggle with financial pressure, online course delivery is being offered as a way to cope. This analysis provides an additional metric to evaluate online courses and includes other potential financial savings.

Social implications

Transportation contributes to local air pollution and emissions of heat-trapping gases. As universities move toward more sustainable behaviors, reducing automobile trips to campus can be seen as a priority.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to model the relationship between hybrid courses and CO2 emissions at an urban university. This information will be valuable to the SJSU community, as well as many other institutions.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2022

Miller Williams Appau, Elvis Attakora-Amaniampong and Oliver Tannor

The adaptation of emerging building designs for single room occupancy in off-campus university student housing during the COVID-19 pandemic is evolving. However, assessing…

Abstract

Purpose

The adaptation of emerging building designs for single room occupancy in off-campus university student housing during the COVID-19 pandemic is evolving. However, assessing its effects on student satisfaction to compensate for COVID-19-associated impacts is missing. As a result, the study examines the satisfaction of students with emerging building designs in single-room off-campus student housing in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is quantitatively based on positivist philosophical thinking. A purposive sample of 202 purpose-built student housing facilities was selected across public and private universities in Ghana. Using systematic stratified sampling, the study sampled 1,212 student residents through a survey. A principal component method (PCM) was used to assess the availability of 10 emerging building design and basic building services variables across the study location. Multiple regression was employed to determine the satisfaction and predict potential variables for policy formulation.

Findings

The analysis revealed that private space for social distancing, the availability of hands-free fittings in the toilet and bathroom, and the availability of hands-free fixtures in the kitchen unit was common single-room self-occupancy support systems. However, there is a huge gap in the availability of key emerging building designs and basic building services and their associated effects on students' satisfaction across the study locations. Therefore, relevant proposals to serve as fundamental requirements for developing an off-campus student housing model during pandemics were indicated.

Research limitations/implications

It is seen that emerging building designs across the housing sector are equally evolving among off-campus student housing. The study helped to understand that student satisfaction with emerging building designs and basic services is a motivational need for students. However, the preparedness of student housing owners to adopt and satisfy the requirements of these design require further studies.

Originality/value

While COVID-19 and its associated effect keep evolving in building design requirements, it is equally relevant to assess the students' satisfaction with these designs and services among single room occupancy-made off-campus student housing. This research is limited to Africa.

Details

Open House International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2022

Yosafat Winarto, Ofita Purwani, Wiwik Setyaningsih and Bambang Triratma

This research is oriented to the need for new ideas related to the concept of a green campus that respond to climate change. The concept is simulated with a campus area in…

Abstract

Purpose

This research is oriented to the need for new ideas related to the concept of a green campus that respond to climate change. The concept is simulated with a campus area in Indonesia, a country that requires a lot of school planning for human resource development that requires clean, renewable energy and zero emissions in a humid tropical climate.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out in a mixed qualitative-quantitative method using field observations and literature studies through an approach to developing a pedagogical pattern of cognitive, affective and psychomotor, relevant theoretical studies and comprehensive analysis of all variables and aspects. Analysis through the parameter matrix of green buildings and green campuses to produce a zero emission and energy efficient campus area concept.

Findings

The concept of an integrated campus area model that can holistically save energy optimally and free from emissions and can produce graduates who are aware and have high cognitive, affective and psychomotor competencies toward environmental conservation efforts. Green campus design is not only physical design, but needs to be integrated with green curriculum content.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this research is in the scope of architectural and environmental sciences.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this research is a new green campus concept that is environmentally friendly and sustainable in a hot-humid tropical climate.

Social implications

This research revives the cognitive, affective and psychomotor competencies of human individuals at the highest level to equip the ability to repair and maintain the environment. The research resulted in a refinement of the green campus concept that was integrated into the curriculum.

Originality/value

A holistic and integrated green campus concept between the development of campus area design and human development aspects.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Daniel Davis and Amy Binder

This study documents a new case of the further commercialization of the university, the rapid adoption of corporate partnership programs (CPPs) within centralized…

Abstract

This study documents a new case of the further commercialization of the university, the rapid adoption of corporate partnership programs (CPPs) within centralized university career services departments. CPPs function as a type of headhunting agency. For an annual fee they facilitate a corporate hiring department’s direct access to student talent, allowing the company to outsource much of its hiring tasks to the university career center. CPPs are a feature found predominantly, though not exclusively, on campuses where there is a highly rationalized logic around the economic benefits of academic science. Further, CPPs represent a commercialization of practice that is in tension with the student-development mission of traditional career counselors. Using an inhabited institutionalist approach, we show how the models differ and how staff on each side attempt to negotiate their competing roles in the multiversity environment. We also discuss some of the potential impact on students, on the career services profession, and on college-to-work pathways.

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Betina Gardner, Trenia L. Napier and Russell G. Carpenter

Utilizing creative campus partnerships, alliances, and mergers, libraries can move from a traditional support role to a more participatory role that actively engages a…

Abstract

Utilizing creative campus partnerships, alliances, and mergers, libraries can move from a traditional support role to a more participatory role that actively engages a university’s academic mission. Libraries, as centralizing, politically neutral hubs for information, can serve as catalysts for collaborative planning that paves the way for creating innovative campus spaces and services in conjunction with other academic or general campus units. By forging alliances and merging services and resources with campus partners, such as Information Technology (IT) and the English and Communication departments, the library can address student need and initiate transformational changes—changes that are broader in scope than those within traditional library functions. The case study in this chapter provides an exploration of the merging of library services with a writing center, an effort which was enhanced by adding an oral communication support service. It provides examples of what can be accomplished through visionary leadership and teamwork in 21st-century academic libraries, focusing on how student need and library use prompted institutional change at a mid-sized regional comprehensive university. The authors highlight the essential structural and operational mergers and alliances involved in integrating existing and developing library and campus initiatives to create a unique integrated service point for research, writing, and oral communication in the heart of the university’s main library. The case study also identifies continued partnership and collaboration, and briefly outlines methods through which libraries might initiate similar transformational changes and mergers at their own institutions, serving as a model for similar alliances in other settings.

Details

Mergers and Alliances: The Operational View and Cases
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-054-3

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sexual Violence on Campus
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-229-1

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