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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Eelis Rytkönen, Christopher Heywood and Suvi Nenonen

This paper aims to outline campus management process dynamics that are affected by glocalization, changing funding structures and digitalization, and answer: How do…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline campus management process dynamics that are affected by glocalization, changing funding structures and digitalization, and answer: How do glocalization, changing funding structures and digitalization challenge university campus management? and What implications do the challenges have on campus management processes?

Design/methodology/approach

Literature overview discusses how glocalization, changing funding structures and digitalization affect campus management. Empirical part explores how these forces affect management processes through 36 interviews on multiple embedded cases in the main campuses of Aalto University in Finland and the University of Melbourne in Australia.

Findings

Major challenges include future foresight, institutional sharing, economical paucity and functional flexibility. Heterogeneous user behaviors challenge absolute spatial measures as bases for designing learning and working environments. Finding a balance between long-haul portfolio maintenance for the university and future users and short-haul flexible pilots for the current user communities is crucial.

Research limitations/implications

The results derive from interviews of 36 campus management professionals from two campus management organizations limiting the validity and the reliability of the study. Further studies should be conducted by replicating the study in another context, by interviewing end users and clients and by investigating case investments and impacts over time.

Practical implications

Campus managers can answer the challenges through practical applications such as big data collection and sharing in physical environments, integrated service provision to thematic communities, cross-pollination of user communities and open access to information and infrastructure services.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights and tools to strategic alignment by comparing campus management of two fundamentally different systems in the context of higher education and on-going digitalization.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Niclas Sandström and Anne Nevgi

This paper aims to study a change process on a university campus from a pedagogical perspective. The aim of the process, as expressed by facilities management and faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study a change process on a university campus from a pedagogical perspective. The aim of the process, as expressed by facilities management and faculty leadership, was to create campus learning landscapes that promote social encounters and learning between students and researchers, as well as other embedded groups. The paper addresses how pedagogical needs are or should be integrated in the design process.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of this case study regarding change on campus consist of semi-structured interviews of information-rich key stakeholders identified using snowball sampling method. The interviews were analysed to find common themes and reference to pedagogical needs and expectations.

Findings

Campus usability and reliability are improved when pedagogy informs the design, and needs such as sense of belonging (human) and connectivity (digital) are fulfilled. User-centred design should be followed through during the whole campus change process, and there should be sufficient communications between user groups.

Research limitations/implications

The discussion is based on one case. However, the recommendations are solid and also reflected in other related research literature regarding campus change initiatives.

Practical implications

The paper states recommendations for including pedagogical needs in campus learning landscape change and underlines the role of real user-centred processes in reaching this goal.

Originality/value

The study introduces the concept of campus reliability and highlights a missing link from many campus change cases – pedagogy – which is suggested to be essential in informing campus designs that produce usable and reliable future-ready outcomes.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Flavia Curvelo Curvelo Magdaniel, Alexandra Den Heijer and Monique Arkesteijn

This paper aims to underpin the importance of the availability (or absence) of campus management information (CMI) in supporting universities’ goals.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to underpin the importance of the availability (or absence) of campus management information (CMI) in supporting universities’ goals.

Design/methodology/approach

Four perspectives of campus management were used to develop a structured survey enquiring campus managers about universities’ goals, finances, users and spaces. Its descriptive analysis distinguishes two domains: campus strategy and CMI.

Findings

A total of 14 participant universities in nine countries provided substantial data, increasing the available CMI in each of the four perspectives compared with previous research. Three goal-related patterns driving the strategies of universities and their campuses were identified across competitive, social, economic and environmental performance aspects. Accordingly, particular CMI is discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s overarching approach in four perspectives challenged the collection of data, which needed to be retrieved from different departments in the organisation, with different domains (human resources, finance, facilities and organisational strategy), lingo and accountability cultures.

Originality/value

These findings improve the current understanding of university campuses as strategic resources enabling a variety of university goals and missions in today’s knowledge-based economy, society and cities. Moreover, the authors discuss that a more structural approach to collecting CMI may benefit universities to identify critical aspects of campus management supporting their strategies from which performance indicators can be derived and shared among campus managers with similar strategies to make better future decisions.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Sami Kärnä and Päivi Julin

The purpose of the study is to evaluate and discuss the extent of the satisfaction as perceived by the students and staff towards university facilities and services in two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to evaluate and discuss the extent of the satisfaction as perceived by the students and staff towards university facilities and services in two campuses in Finland. The aim is to analyse which facility-related factors have the greatest impacts on students’ and staff’s overall satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The extensive survey was conducted to investigate how the university students and staff assess the university campus and facility services. A framework was developed to prioritise the satisfaction factors towards the facilities in two campuses in the both groups. The study was executed with the statistical assessment method, which combines each question’s mean value and how it affects overall satisfaction.

Findings

The findings show that there are differences in the main features of the satisfaction as assessed by the groups and between the two campuses. Student satisfaction consist of factors related to comfortable learning environment, where public spaces and campus accessibility play vital roles. Staff satisfaction can be characterised as a comprehensive campus experience and where laboratory and teaching facilities create value to the staff. In general, results show that the factors related to the research and teaching spaces have the greatest impacts on the overall satisfaction in the both groups. The improvement of the quality of these spaces will then directly assist staff and students in achieving their objectives.

Practical implications

The measurement method developed in the study helps campus facilities’ management to prioritise satisfaction factors and identify the areas of the quality improvements. This information can be used widely, for instance, in the campus development, facilities management and improvement of the university services.

Originality/value

The framework analyses which factors of the facilities have the greatest impacts on the overall satisfaction as perceived by the students and staff. The outcome of the study will improve the knowledge of which aspects of the facilities created value to the universities’ core functions.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Bart Valks, Monique Arkesteijn and Alexandra Den Heijer

The purpose of this study is to generate knowledge about the use of smart campus tools to improve the effective and efficient use of campuses. Many universities are facing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to generate knowledge about the use of smart campus tools to improve the effective and efficient use of campuses. Many universities are facing a challenge in attuning their accommodation to organisational demand. How can universities invest their resources as effectively as possible and not in space that will be poorly utilized? The hypothesis of this paper is that by using smart campus tools, this problem can be solved.

Design/methodology/approach

To answer the research question, previous survey at 13 Dutch universities was updated and compared with a survey of various universities and other organizations. The survey consisted of interviews with structured and semi-structured questions, which resulted in a unified output for 27 cases.

Findings

Based on the output of the cases, the development of smart campus tools at Dutch universities was compared to that of international universities and other organizations. Furthermore, the data collection led to insights regarding the reasons for initiating smart campus tools, user and management information, costs and benefits and foreseen developments.

Originality/value

Although the use of smart tools in practice has gained significant momentum in the past few years, research on the subject is still very technology-oriented and not well-connected to facility management and real estate management. This paper provides an overview of the ways in which universities and organizations are currently supporting their users, improving the use of their buildings and reducing their energy footprint through the use of smart tools.

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2019

Ali Nizam

Increasing flexibility and student mobility are among the most important objectives of today’s universities. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effects of student…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing flexibility and student mobility are among the most important objectives of today’s universities. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effects of student exchange process (SEP) on a campus management system (CMS), compare different models and recommend an improvement handling transfer process.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review of how credit transfer is handled in today’s CMS was conducted to understand the information management methods used in the student transfer process. On this basis, a flexible task-based system design is recommended to facilitate the transfer of educational gains between universities. For evaluating the effectiveness of different system designs in the SEP, the duration of information processing process steps was measured quantitatively via on-site observations and user interview in a university’s horizontal, vertical and the Erasmus student exchange (SE) data.

Findings

Building a flexible system design based on a loosely coupled mapping between curriculum and educational activities, and increasing the self-management capabilities of a student will facilitate managing SE data in an integrated environment and reduce the university staff’s workload considerably.

Originality/value

To the author’s knowledge, this is the first study making quantitatively measurement and comparison of different credit transfer methods of CMSs. Based on this result, the authors have recommended a new flexible method that supports increasing a student’s self-administration capabilities, reducing the workload of university staff, and contributes academic mobility.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 37 no. 1-2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Kallol Das

The purpose of this paper is to review the academic literature on relationship marketing (RM), conduct a content analysis of the same for the purpose of classification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the academic literature on relationship marketing (RM), conduct a content analysis of the same for the purpose of classification and provides a comprehensive bibliography.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of online databases were searched to review the literature on RM. Only, 209 papers had RM as the primary research topic. The full text of each paper was taken as the unit of analysis. The classification of all the units into mutually exclusive categories was done by two independent researchers.

Findings

The content analysis led to classification of literature into five mutually exclusive categories viz. objectives, defining constructs, instruments, industrial applications and issues. The contribution of research papers has been on the rise across the time frame and there has been a sharp rise in RM research publication in the recent years. The study revealed many other useful findings.

Research limitations/implications

The findings can be generalized only to the population of selected online databases for the given time period but not to the larger universe of RM literature. The study identifies various untapped areas for further research in terms of industry, country of study, research methods, type of study, etc.

Practical implications

The paper provides a roster of field projects accompanied by a comprehensive bibliography that will be useful to both academics and practitioners for studying existing research as well as for contemplating future research.

Originality/value

This is the only paper that provides a literature review and bibliography of RM literature for the period 1994‐2006.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Eelis Rytkönen, Suvi Nenonen, Erica Österlund and Inka Kojo

– The purpose of this paper is to characterize development processes of eight novel learning environment projects in one university campus in Finland.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to characterize development processes of eight novel learning environment projects in one university campus in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

This study builds propositions on case study data in an attempt to characterize the distinguished cases. In total, 22 semi-structured interviews were conducted as the primary data collection method. Supporting data includes archives, seminars and workshops. The data were analyzed in ATLAS.ti.

Findings

The cases are unique in their processes constituting socio-technical change. They represent two main process types: agile, iterative bottom-up processes and slow, linear, top-down processes. The essence of each project is in balancing in five dimensions of approach, motivation, budget, type of outcome and added value (AMB to AV) process management model: approach scaling from strategic to operational, motivation scaling from space to activity, budget scaling from fixed to seed money, type of outcome scaling from slow and standardized to quick and dirty and added value scaling from research to societal impact.

Research limitations/implications

The cases are highly context-dependent and only provide a narrow understanding of a previously little studied area. The main contribution is in highlighting the complexity of the studied phenomenon. Future research could further the subject by, i.e. testing the created model in another context.

Practical implications

Transformation from institutionalized learning environments toward campuses facilitating learning flows requires multiple supporting processes. The roles of the campus managers are expanded from measuring, controlling and maintaining the campuses toward identifying, empowering, supporting and enabling user communities to affect their working and learning environments.

Originality/value

Managing campuses top-down based on large amounts of data can be supported by bottom-up approaches. This study outlines a systemic framework for supporting both types of processes.

Details

Facilities, vol. 33 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Stewart H.C. Wan and Yuk‐Hee Chan

The purpose of this paper is to first evaluate the effect of IT service management (ITSM) tools in a practical environment followed by sharing experience in developing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first evaluate the effect of IT service management (ITSM) tools in a practical environment followed by sharing experience in developing management process modules in a service outsourcing model. In order to improve the fault correlation from business and user perspectives, the aim is to propose a framework to automate network and system alerts with respect to its business service impact and user impact for proactive notification to IT operations management.

Design/methodology/approach

Three years of quantitative analysis using real operational data were used to present the effect on ITSM tools adoption. For the proposed framework, it consists of a hybrid case‐ and rule‐based reasoning module and a new approach for fault mapping with business criticality and user activities.

Findings

Over the past decade there has been significant focus in the context of ITSM in the IT services operations industry. In the market of ITSM software tools, customer and operational processes are not sufficiently developed nor integrated with other management applications following IT services daily processes which make it difficult to correlate faults to business service impacts and user impacts. For any fault of the same severity level, traditional fault discovery and notification tools provide equal weighting from business and user points of view.

Research limitations/implications

Most of the related works were done individually in the entire ITSM processes. Moreover, some works present the enabling technology for outsourced facilities management rather than IT operations management. Lack of research activity was noted in the areas of user and business impact correlation with service management.

Practical implications

This paper outlines the implications of implementing ITSM tools in outsourced IT operation. The business continuity planning also forms one of the critical factors to improve responsiveness in service management.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the effect of ITSM tools adoption by analyzing real operation data. Central to the service‐oriented philosophy in ITSM, we introduce a framework to correlate with user and business elements. Inclusion of the dimensions of business and user impact in the fault correlation process could further improve service efficiency and user satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Stewart H.C. Wan and Yuk‐Hee Chan

This paper aims at presenting the benefits from implementing IT service management (ITSM) in an organization for managing campus‐wide IT operations. In order to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at presenting the benefits from implementing IT service management (ITSM) in an organization for managing campus‐wide IT operations. In order to improve the fault correlation from business perspectives, we proposed a framework to automate network and system alerts with respect to its business service impact for proactive notification to IT operations management.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first evaluate the effect of IT service management (ITSM) tools in practical adoption followed by experience sharing in developing management process modules in service outsourcing model. Three years of quantitative analysis using real operational data were used to present the effect on ITSM tools adoption. A framework was developed from the study of literatures in service management, incident prioritization, and business continuity planning. For the proposed framework, it consists of a hybrid case‐based and rule‐based reasoning module and a new approach which utilizing business continuity planning for service‐resource mapping with business criticality and user activities.

Findings

For the past decade in the IT industry, a paradigm shift in managing IT could be observed. People are concerned more in managing IT services instead of traditional device‐oriented IT system or network components. With the term “business‐driven IT services,” it has raised new challenges in the area of IT service management, especially with respect to the management of service level agreement with service provider and the management of system and network faults.

Research limitations/implications

Further work should be carried out on the aspect of using real data for the framework as motivated by the limitations of the present study. Practical real data could help the reader to experience its quantitative benefits.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the value of effective IT service management, placing particular emphasis on service outsourcing consideration and the mechanism in service‐event correlation.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the effect of ITSM tools adoption by analyzing real operation data. The proposed framework explicitly utilizes business continuity planning (BCP) processes to identify the relationships between business services and IT resources that helps to improve the IT service management.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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