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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Lynn Deeken, Meggan Press, Angie Thorpe Pusnik, Laura Birkenhauer, Nate Floyd, Lindsay Miller, Andrew Revelle, Jaclyn Spraetz, Christina Riehman-Murphy, Christie Flynn, Caitlin Gerrity, Stephanie J. Graves, Sarah LeMire, Anne Pemberton, Vonzell DeRico Yeager and Magen Bednar

This paper aims to demonstrate the variety of ways institutions and their libraries approach student success both conceptionally and operationally.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the variety of ways institutions and their libraries approach student success both conceptionally and operationally.

Design/methodology/approach

Librarians from nine different institutions of higher education were given a series of questions about student success on their campuses and in their libraries. They responded with written essays describing their experiences and perspectives.

Findings

The contributed pieces are collected together and display a shared interest in defining “student success,” aligning strategic planning with student success initiatives and establishing (and assessing) strong infrastructure to support student success.

Originality/value

These examples help us observe what is happening throughout higher education and see potential paths forward at our own institutions engaged in this work.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Anne R. Diekema, Caitlin Gerrity and Paula Mitchell

Ideally, information literacy instruction is sequenced throughout students’ academic careers, reinforcing and building on earlier instruction. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Ideally, information literacy instruction is sequenced throughout students’ academic careers, reinforcing and building on earlier instruction. The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify structural problems that potentially impact student learning. This research surveyed school librarians and academic instruction librarians along the K-20 pipeline to capture information about their instruction programs, their pedagogical approaches and their perceptions on student information literacy skills at points of transition.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a 58-item survey instrument to capture the perceptions on elements of information literacy instruction from school librarians and academic instruction librarians in the state of Utah. The exploratory survey generated 255 eligible responses.

Findings

The study identifies several areas where the information literacy pipeline has challenges: staffing, scheduling, curriculum integration, teacher collaboration and student assessment. Suggestions for improvement include providing educational support for paraprofessionals, facilitating cross-institutional collaboration and creating a scope and sequence document that spans the entire educational spectrum paired with specifically teaching for transfer.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to surveying the perceptions of library employees who teach students information literacy as part of a school or university. Study findings imply that better support for information literacy learners requires increased collaboration across the pipeline.

Originality/value

Information literacy education is often siloed – in the way it is taught, studied and discussed. This research is unique in that it explores the information literacy pipeline as a whole, as each level of instruction is related to the next and studying a single section might obscure larger issues.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2022

Ashley J. Maister, Caitlin McCarthy, Lee G. Ruszczyk, Rachael Evans and Megan E. Maroney

Integrated health care occurs when specialty and general care providers work together to address both the physical and mental health needs of their patients. The Substance…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated health care occurs when specialty and general care providers work together to address both the physical and mental health needs of their patients. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration model of integration is broken into six levels of coordinated, co-located and integrated care. Our institution offers both co-located and integrated care among eight clinic sites. The care team is typically composed of the primary care provider, nurse and medical assistant, but other professionals may be introduced based on the patient’s medical and psychiatric conditions. The purpose of this prospective, quality improvement study was to compare the rates of adherence to long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIAs) between both types of integrated primary care settings at our institution. The comparison of the two settings sought to determine which environment provides improved outcomes for patients with serious psychiatric illnesses. Additionally, we aimed to assess the quality of medication-related monitoring and care team composition between care settings, and the ability of pharmacists to deliver interprofessional care team training and education on LAI use in clinical practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects were identified and included in the study if they had received primary care services from our institution within the previous 12 months. Patient demographic and laboratory variables were collected at baseline and when clinically indicated. The rates of adherence between care settings were assessed at intervals that align with the medication’s administration schedule (e.g. every four weeks). Medication-related monitoring parameters were collected at baseline and when clinically indicated. The interprofessional care team completed Likert scale surveys to evaluate the pharmacist’s LAIA education and training.

Findings

There was not a statistically significant difference detected between integrated primary care settings on the rates of adherence to LAIAs. Additionally, there was not a statistically significant difference between rates of adherence to medication-related monitoring parameters or the effect of the patient treatment team composition. There was a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-session survey scores following interprofessional education and training provided by a pharmacist.

Originality/value

Because overall rates of adherence were low, both primary care settings were found to be equivalent. Our study may have been underpowered to detect a difference in the primary endpoint because of the small sample size. However, our study demonstrates that interprofessional education and training may lend itself to changes in practice, which is evident by the clinically significant relative increase in adherence. The Henry J. Austin Health Center network will be implementing a standard operating procedure regarding LAIA management within the primary care setting. Further studies are needed to assess a larger number of patients between both types of primary care settings, as well as the impact of the clinical psychiatric pharmacist as a member of the treatment team.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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