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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Binshan Lin, Professor, Charlotte A. Jones and Professor

Difficulties in conducting effective surveys to address customer satisfaction issues can be a significant problem in marketing practice. Addresses four of the most crucial…

Abstract

Difficulties in conducting effective surveys to address customer satisfaction issues can be a significant problem in marketing practice. Addresses four of the most crucial methodological issues encountered with customer satisfaction surveys, namely sampling frames, quality of survey data and instruments, non‐response problems, and reporting of results and interpretation. Provides implications and guidelines.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2001

Michael S. Garver

While most practitioners are familiar with traditional customer satisfaction surveys, research findings suggest that best practice companies use multiple tools to bring…

Abstract

While most practitioners are familiar with traditional customer satisfaction surveys, research findings suggest that best practice companies use multiple tools to bring the voice of the customer inside the organization. The purpose of this study is to examine how best practice companies use various tools to listen to customers. The primary contribution of this article is in discussing a variety of different customer listening tools used by practitioners, along with introducing new customer listening tools to the literature. Furthermore, this article puts forth a framework that captures essential characteristics of each tool, depicting when their use is most appropriate. Finally, this article depicts how customer listening tools are linked together and synthesized into a customer performance model.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Promporn Wangwacharakul, Silvia Márquez Medina and Bozena Bonnie Poksinska

Customers from different cultures might have different expectations and perceptions of quality, leading to different levels of satisfaction. Together with the construct…

Abstract

Purpose

Customers from different cultures might have different expectations and perceptions of quality, leading to different levels of satisfaction. Together with the construct and measurement equivalence issues of cross-cultural surveys, this raises the question of the comparability of customer satisfaction measurements across countries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the survey method of anchoring vignettes as a tool for improving the comparability of customer satisfaction measurements across countries and to shed some light on cultural influences on customer satisfaction measurements.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the models of American Customer Satisfaction Index and European Performance Satisfaction Index, the authors designed and conducted a survey using the method of anchoring vignettes to measure and compare customer satisfaction with mobile phone services in four countries – Costa Rica, Poland, Sweden and Thailand. The survey was carried out with young adults aged 20–30 years, who were mostly university students.

Findings

This study demonstrates how anchoring vignettes can be used to mitigate cultural bias in customer satisfaction surveys and to improve both construct and measurement equivalence of the questionnaire. The results show that different conclusions on cross-cultural benchmarking of customer satisfaction would be drawn when using a traditional survey compared to the anchoring vignettes method.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates the survey method of anchoring vignettes as a potential quantitative research method for studying customer satisfaction across countries. The results also contribute to customer satisfaction research as these shed some light onto how culture influences customer satisfaction measurements. The practical implication for firms and managers is that allocating resources among different countries based on traditional customer satisfaction surveys may be misleading.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Utpal M. Dholakia

This chapter reviews research on the question–behavior effect, the phenomenon that asking questions influences respondents’ behavior. Two distinct research streams, the…

Abstract

This chapter reviews research on the question–behavior effect, the phenomenon that asking questions influences respondents’ behavior. Two distinct research streams, the self-prophecy effect, concerned with socially normative behaviors, and the mere measurement effect, dealing with purchase behaviors without socially normative significance, are identified. Despite the recent attempt at integration, it is argued that there are fundamental differences between the two effects. Distinctions are also drawn between lab-based and field-based mere measurement effects, and between normatively consistent and implicit attitude-driven, normatively inconsistent self-prophecy effects. Key studies, theoretical explanations, and moderators of each effect are discussed, potential unanswered questions and research opportunities are identified, and significant managerial and policy implications are highlighted.

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-475-8

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Utpal Dholakia

The dominant worldview among marketers is one of technology optimism, which holds that technological advances influence consumers and businesses in positive ways. In…

Abstract

The dominant worldview among marketers is one of technology optimism, which holds that technological advances influence consumers and businesses in positive ways. In direct contrast to this perspective, I advance the thesis that at the organizational frontlines where marketers interact with consumers by observing, informing, persuading, negotiating and co-creating with, and entertaining them, technology commonly produces unforeseen and unexpected effects on consumers with significant negative implications for marketers. The result is Adverse Technology-Consumer Interactions (ATCIs). Marketing practitioners play an instrumental role in producing and exacerbating ATCIs. Yet, I argue they have few incentives to fully investigate the underlying reasons, understand their scope, or find solutions to these potentially troublesome phenomena. Academic researchers, however, are uniquely poised to identify ATCIs, investigate them in depth by considering their industry-wide and society-wide import, develop appropriate theoretical frameworks, and design and test solutions to alleviate their effects. I develop these ideas by considering two ATCIs, falling response rates to customer surveys and customer reactance to frequent price changes. I also point out promising research opportunities for both these phenomena.

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Marketing in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-339-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Chris Drake, Anne Gwynne and Nigel Waite

Outlines the development by Barclays Life of a tracking survey to collect information concerning customers’ feelings of satisfaction and loyalty. Describes research…

Abstract

Outlines the development by Barclays Life of a tracking survey to collect information concerning customers’ feelings of satisfaction and loyalty. Describes research undertaken by Barclays Life into the determinants of satisfaction amongst customers and the importance of each of these elements in determining loyalty. Initial qualitative research was undertaken to allow the company to develop a frame of reference concerning the elements of service which customers considered important. These initial findings were used in later quantitative studies to establish the relative importance of the different elements, with a view to understanding what was determining customer loyalty. The research culminated in the development of a tracking survey instrument, now used by the company to monitor customer satisfaction and loyalty levels across time and customer groups. Discusses both the findings of the research undertaken, and the importance of such research for firms. Outlines the use to which the information gathered by the surveys is put, together with initiatives which have resulted from the research.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Frank Polischuk

Discusses how Digital Customer Services highlights a survey on achieving good “scores”, helping everyone in the organisation to work towards customer satisfaction…

Abstract

Discusses how Digital Customer Services highlights a survey on achieving good “scores”, helping everyone in the organisation to work towards customer satisfaction. Describes three facets of the survey. Stresses that information gained from the survey can be utilised. Focuses on the use of the expectation scale and asserts that a survey can focus on achieving good “scores” which can be used as a public relations tool or it can help all to work towards customer satisfaction. Concludes that the programme is ever‐changing and the organisation committed to adjusting survey techniques to suit the changing dynamics and needs of a growing customer base in a global market.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Rebecca Mugridge and Nancy M. Poehlmann

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an internal customer service survey approach to assessment delivers many benefits to technical services and library…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an internal customer service survey approach to assessment delivers many benefits to technical services and library systems units. Findings from such a survey provide the evidence needed to implement process improvements, conduct strategic planning and more. The survey used in this case study can be adapted by other libraries or library units to conduct assessment, gauge customer satisfaction and identify areas for process improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

The Technical Services and Library Systems Division of the University at Albany Libraries conducted an internal customer service survey to gauge customer satisfaction with its services.

Findings

Survey results demonstrated that customer surveys are a valuable assessment tool and can be used as an evidence-based approach to library management. Technical services and library systems units should use this tool to identify whether customers are satisfied with the services provided, whether the services are still needed, whether additional services are needed and more.

Practical implications

This paper provides an approach to conducting a customer service survey, an analysis of potential benefits and a survey instrument that others could adapt to use in their own libraries. The survey instrument can be used not only for assessment of technical services and library systems, but by other functional units in all types of libraries.

Originality/value

This paper and approach is original research; there are no other papers on this topic in the library and information science literature.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Josu Takala, Amnat Bhufhai and Kongkiti Phusavat

To address multiple problems facing a company's top management with respect to the customer satisfaction survey. Is the customer satisfaction survey still suitable after…

Abstract

Purpose

To address multiple problems facing a company's top management with respect to the customer satisfaction survey. Is the customer satisfaction survey still suitable after many years of use? What method should be applied to help ensure better utilization of information from the customer satisfaction survey? Should the three aspects (i.e. quality, delivery, and responsiveness) representing the customer satisfaction continue to be used as part of the survey's main contents. As an ISO 9001: 2000 certified company, the customer satisfaction survey is required.

Design/methodology/approach

A method was proposed to help integrate the survey results with other key performance indicators (or ratios). This integration represented the verification effort on the suitability of the customer satisfaction survey. The examinations into the interrelationships between these three aspects the company's performance indicators included three perspectives. They were: no time‐factor consideration; one‐period time‐lag factor; and two‐period time‐lag factor. The set of key performance indicators was selected jointly with the company's top management.

Findings

The findings indicated that the quality and responsiveness aspects were still suitable. This was because these results were closely related to the production volumes, number of customer complaints, number of customers, and, etc. Therefore, the revision of the customer satisfaction survey needed to focus on adding other aspects such as flexibility and courtesy while doing away with the delivery aspect.

Practical implications

The proposed method, and its findings and recommendations received positive responses from the company's top management. This method utilized and related existing performance information in an integrated manner.

Originality/value

This study generated a potential approach to understand and to help interpret the customer satisfaction survey's results, to boost the utilization of relevant performance information, and likely to assist in a target‐setting process during a planning session.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 106 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2015

Dekar Urumsah

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally…

Abstract

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally. This is especially relevant in the context of Indonesian Airline companies. Therefore, many airline customers in Indonesia are still in doubt about it, or even do not use it. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for e-services adoption and empirically examines the factors influencing the airlines customers in Indonesia in using e-services offered by the Indonesian airline companies. Taking six Indonesian airline companies as a case example, the study investigated the antecedents of e-services usage of Indonesian airlines. This study further examined the impacts of motivation on customers in using e-services in the Indonesian context. Another important aim of this study was to investigate how ages, experiences and geographical areas moderate effects of e-services usage.

The study adopts a positivist research paradigm with a two-phase sequential mixed method design involving qualitative and quantitative approaches. An initial research model was first developed based on an extensive literature review, by combining acceptance and use of information technology theories, expectancy theory and the inter-organizational system motivation models. A qualitative field study via semi-structured interviews was then conducted to explore the present state among 15 respondents. The results of the interviews were analysed using content analysis yielding the final model of e-services usage. Eighteen antecedent factors hypotheses and three moderating factors hypotheses and 52-item questionnaire were developed. A focus group discussion of five respondents and a pilot study of 59 respondents resulted in final version of the questionnaire.

In the second phase, the main survey was conducted nationally to collect the research data among Indonesian airline customers who had already used Indonesian airline e-services. A total of 819 valid questionnaires were obtained. The data was then analysed using a partial least square (PLS) based structural equation modelling (SEM) technique to produce the contributions of links in the e-services model (22% of all the variances in e-services usage, 37.8% in intention to use, 46.6% in motivation, 39.2% in outcome expectancy, and 37.7% in effort expectancy). Meanwhile, path coefficients and t-values demonstrated various different influences of antecedent factors towards e-services usage. Additionally, a multi-group analysis based on PLS is employed with mixed results. In the final findings, 14 hypotheses were supported and 7 hypotheses were not supported.

The major findings of this study have confirmed that motivation has the strongest contribution in e-services usage. In addition, motivation affects e-services usage both directly and indirectly through intention-to-use. This study provides contributions to the existing knowledge of e-services models, and practical applications of IT usage. Most importantly, an understanding of antecedents of e-services adoption will provide guidelines for stakeholders in developing better e-services and strategies in order to promote and encourage more customers to use e-services. Finally, the accomplishment of this study can be expanded through possible adaptations in other industries and other geographical contexts.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

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