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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Sarah Powell

This paper seeks to present an interview with Ross Campbell, a Melbourne, Australia‐based crisis management practitioner, focusing on the development of crisis management

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present an interview with Ross Campbell, a Melbourne, Australia‐based crisis management practitioner, focusing on the development of crisis management as distinct from risk management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an interview to explain the importance of investment in crisis management and outlines what is involved.

Findings

The paper offers examples of good crisis management practice and looks at some cases of failure to anticipate and prepare for potential crises.

Originality/value

The paper warns that such failures can not only damage corporate resources and reputations, but can also result in an organization's demise. The paper also lays particular emphasis on the need for a timely and efficient message strategy.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Abdul Gani and Ramjit Singh

This study aims to explore the preparedness and the recovery/rebuilding activities or strategies adopted by the respondents during the phases of natural disaster/crisis in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the preparedness and the recovery/rebuilding activities or strategies adopted by the respondents during the phases of natural disaster/crisis in Jammu and Kashmir and Assam, India.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research design was chosen for the study. The interview method was adopted in the present research. The respondents were selected purposefully from the representatives of tourism organizations/destinations management organizations and emergency organizations, i.e. disaster management and hotels experienced by natural disasters, i.e. flood 2014 in Kashmir valley 2019 in Assam states of India.

Findings

Moderate level of preparedness among the tourism organizations, tourism businesses such as hotels leaves implications for them to enhance the disaster or crisis resilient community. The preparedness programs, efficient social media, communications strategies and development of tourist destinations-specific disaster-related crisis management plans were suggested to enhance disaster resilience.

Originality/value

The present study is widely contributing to the theory of the vital concepts of crisis management at tourism destinations. This study suggests the practical implications for and suggestions to the industry practitioners, government agencies and researchers to rebuild the tourist destinations from the disaster/crisis and enhance global resilience.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

John K.S. Chong

Crises can threaten the continued existence of an organization. In today’s highly uncertain and turbulent business environment, managers must develop stronger crisis

Abstract

Crises can threaten the continued existence of an organization. In today’s highly uncertain and turbulent business environment, managers must develop stronger crisis decision‐making skills. This article outlines a practical six‐step approach to improving organizational crisis‐preparedness. It also suggests that crisis management is a critical component of contemporary strategic management. Managers can be expected to do a better job in dealing with crises if they follow the recommended six‐step approach and make a conscientious effort to integrate crisis management into the process of strategic management.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Abstract

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Advocacy and Organizational Engagement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-437-9

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Abrar Faisal, Julia N. Albrecht and Willem J.L. Coetzee

This paper aims to respond to the strong calls for interdisciplinary solutions to address the many and varied challenges that major disasters create in urban (tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to respond to the strong calls for interdisciplinary solutions to address the many and varied challenges that major disasters create in urban (tourism) spaces, and provide a holistic conceptualisation of organisational responses to disruptions in the external business environment. It argues that organisations need to actively (re)formulate a sustainable business proposition to passively adapt to environmental conditions and modify the selective environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative approach to introducing and examining the concepts and theoretical constructs underpinning the proposed conceptual schemata. The content-driven inductive approach used here is based on an extensive review of the disaster recovery, crisis management, entrepreneurial strategy and urban tourism literature with a focus on organisational perspectives. It systematically brings together the theories and research findings from these separate strands of literature.

Findings

While the extant literature focuses on the importance of effective adaptability to survive and thrive in environmental uncertainties, some aspects of the relevant evolutionary processes are not addressed in the context of urban tourism. Indeed, a systematic approach that questions how urban tourism and hospitality businesses react to crises has been long overdue. This paper, therefore, introduces niche construction theory (NCT) as an alternative and proposes an integrated framework to understand the environmental conditions of urban tourism and organisational evolution during post-disaster turbulence.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model emerging from a multidisciplinary literature review acknowledges boundary conditions in the tourism industry-specific interpretation of a crisis situation. The tenets of NCT need to be adopted flexibly rather than as part of a strictly prescriptive process to allow for all aspects of the related business responses to play out and become exposed to the emerging selection pressures.

Practical implications

The argument underpinned by the theoretical constructs of niche construction encourages and offers a framework for practitioners to actively (re)formulate business proposition and (re)construct organisational niche to survive post-disaster turbulence in the business environment and exert influence over their own evolution.

Originality/value

This paper offers different angles, filters and lenses for constructing and interpreting knowledge of organisational evolution in the context of crisis management. The conceptual schema (Figure 2) emerged as a novel contribution itself providing a necessary lens to interpret the empirical data and understand the complexities of the organisational responses to the disruptive post-disaster turbulence in an urban tourism business environment.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Maria Fors Brandebo

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to increased knowledge of destructive leadership in crisis management. The specific research questions are: (1) What types of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to increased knowledge of destructive leadership in crisis management. The specific research questions are: (1) What types of destructive leadership behaviours can be identified in leaders in crisis management? and (2) Why are these behaviours considered destructive in this context?

Design/methodology/approach

About 21 informants involved in crisis management at regional, local and operational levels in Sweden were interviewed. They were selected since they had recently been involved in severe accidents and/or crises (e.g. terror attacks, forest fires). A grounded theory analysis of interview data yielded two core variables: destructive leadership behaviours, and appraisal: interpretation of leader behaviour.

Findings

The study identified seven different destructive leadership behaviours: four task-related and three relationship-related. Task-related behaviours primarily led to negative consequences for the task/crisis. Relationship-related behaviours have negative consequences for subordinates' job satisfaction, well-being and/or sense of meaningfulness. The paper relates the identified behaviours to existing leadership ideals within crisis management and discusses behaviours that appear to be unique for the crisis management context.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the fact that great crisis managers are not always good at managing relationships, which may have negative implications for crisis management in the long term.

Originality/value

Destructive leadership is a research field that is rapidly expanding. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the nature of destructive leadership behaviours and what makes an individual appraise a leader as destructive in crisis management.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

David Pollard and Sabine Hotho

The aim of this exploratory paper is to consider the strategic importance of crisis management and integration of crisis planning with the organisation's strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this exploratory paper is to consider the strategic importance of crisis management and integration of crisis planning with the organisation's strategy processes, in particular the utilisation of scenario planning as a crisis planning activity.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the crisis management literature was undertaken and key issues identified, subsequently strategic aspects of crisis management were developed in the context of scenario planning.

Findings

The paper contains a discussion of major factors related to a strategic approach to crisis management and a more proactive approach to building relationships with the media. Particular attention should be given to the roles and responses of the media and agencies acting on behalf of the company, as both should been treated in the same way as other relatively powerful stakeholders. The authors suggest that firms can obtain significant advantages through proactive preparation for major relevant contingencies, and its incorporation into the strategic management process.

Originality/value

This paper brings together the debate on the strategic position of crisis management with scenario planning processes to provide a mechanism for designing, evaluating and managing crisis futures. It should prove useful to managers considering the development of crisis management, especially in a strategic context.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Alfonso González‐Herrero and Cornelius Pratt

Using chaos theory as a point of departure, this comparative study of systematic samples of public relations, communication and marketing directors of tourism…

Abstract

Using chaos theory as a point of departure, this comparative study of systematic samples of public relations, communication and marketing directors of tourism organisations in both the USA and Spain identifies the types and the number of crises that these organisations experienced from 1992 to 1994. It also rates the extent to which those practitioners said they used a number of crisis management strategies to minimise, contain or possibly to prevent the negative effects of crises. It identifies the memberships of crisis management teams. Further, it examines the presence of five primary elements of preventive marketing for crisis communications among tourism organisations in those countries. These elements are: issues management, the crisis plan, the crisis management centre, the company representative and the use of external consultants. Results indicate statistically significant differences (p<0.05) between both countries in their organisational preparedness for managing crises, in the types of crises experienced, and in the memberships of their crisis management teams. The implications of these results for effective preventive marketing communications in the tourist industry are discussed and suggestions for future research are offered. The research on which this paper is based was supported by funds awarded to the first author by the Spanish Tourist Institute of the Ministry of Commerce and Tourism, Madrid, Spain.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Sheldene Simola

The purpose of this research was threefold, including to provide a four-point rationale for teaching corporate crisis management as a module within a course on ethical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was threefold, including to provide a four-point rationale for teaching corporate crisis management as a module within a course on ethical decision-making in business and organizations; to provide evaluative data supporting this approach; and to highlight the implications of this approach for human resource development and training.

Design/methodology/approach

Thirty-four undergraduates in a required course on ethical decision-making in business and organizations completed pre- and post-course assignments assessing their knowledge about crisis/management, as well as their skills in crisis recognition, evaluation and action planning. Participants also completed a survey on their perceptions of the crisis management module and its placement within the ethics course.

Findings

Statistical analyses demonstrated significant knowledge acquisition on crisis/management; significant skill development on crisis recognition, evaluation and action planning; and significantly greater “true positives” and significantly fewer “false negatives” in post-course identification of crisis warning signs. Perceptions of the crisis management module and its placement within the course on ethical decision-making were positive.

Research limitations/implications

Although the sample size was relatively small, small samples are associated with a greater risk of failing to detect an effect that is present, rather than the greater predicament of erroneously concluding that an absent effect is actually present. This information, coupled with the fact that the results demonstrated not only statistical significance but also large effect sizes using Cohen’s d, inspires confidence. Nonetheless, additional assessment with larger samples would allow for the possibility of convergent evidence. Similarly, additional assessment within different organizational contexts, including applications in human resource training and development is warranted. Future research should also include assessment of specific underlying teaching strategies and evaluation of whether certain models are associated with greater learning on a broader range of crisis management skills.

Practical implications

Programs in business ethics education and training comprise one useful context in which to teach corporate crisis management. The program specified here addresses two training needs previously specified in the human resource development (HRD) literature on crisis management, including identifying specific methods of enhancing recognition or detection of crisis warning signs and also of providing tools and enhancing skills for assessing and containing crisis.

Originality/value

Despite the centrality of both ethics and HRD to crisis management, there has been a dearth of research on whether ethics education is a useful context through which to teach this topic. This research addresses this dearth and suggests new avenues for HRD in this respect.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Ali Unlu, Naim Kapucu and Bahadir Sahin

Crisis management has gained importance in the policy agendas of many countries around the world due to the increases in the number of natural disasters and terrorist…

Abstract

Purpose

Crisis management has gained importance in the policy agendas of many countries around the world due to the increases in the number of natural disasters and terrorist attacks. Thus, this paper has two purposes. The first is to illustrate how the Turkish Government's Disaster and Crisis Management System has been developed. The second purpose is to make a qualitative evaluation of the current disaster and crisis management systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review shows that the disaster and crisis management system in Turkey has been developed after tragic events. The paper examines what kinds of initiatives were introduced and what is the trend in shift. After analyzing recent cases and exploring some government initiatives, alternative approaches and suggestions were included.

Findings

Turkey has developed its disaster and crisis management system since 1930, which mostly depended on experiences. The current disaster and crisis management system is governed by a centralized structure which is the responsibility of different ministries. Nonetheless, the system is very weak at local level. Furthermore, participation of non‐profit organizations is very limited at both national and local levels. Thus, coordination and management of first‐response operations during crises are problematic and ineffective. Particularly, the system is not designed for different types of crises such as terrorist attacks.

Practical implications

Crisis management in Turkey needs a more unified and flexible structure to deal with current problems effectively. Further suggestions for better implication are also provided

Originality/value

The effectiveness of the disaster and crisis management system is analyzed in natural and man‐made disasters. Findings show that centralized and decentralized systems have different functions in different situations.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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