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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Marcela Georgina Gómez-Zermeño

The purpose of this study is to identify intercultural competencies in community instructors who serve in CONAFE in Chiapas, México.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify intercultural competencies in community instructors who serve in CONAFE in Chiapas, México.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applied a mixed methods method, based on an ethnographic design with a naturalistic approach. The quantitative instrument was applied to 119 community instructors; from these participants, four interviews were conducted with a sample of case-type participants, and four cases are presented.

Findings

The results show differences between community instructors who demonstrate intercultural skills and those who require developing them. It is concluded that teachers should receive training that strengthens their intercultural competences to enable indigenous children to take advantage of the knowledge they acquire in their community and the pedagogical advantage offered by the use of their mother tongue in the teaching–learning process.

Originality/value

This educational research about intercultural competences in the field of indigenous education, community education and intercultural education provides significant learning that advances the understanding and appreciation of cultural diversity.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Carlos Ornelas

In May of 1992 the Mexican federal government transferred to the 31 states responsibility over basic and teacher education. This decentralization strategy was at the core…

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Abstract

In May of 1992 the Mexican federal government transferred to the 31 states responsibility over basic and teacher education. This decentralization strategy was at the core of an overall educational reform that began in late 1980s. The central government had strong motives to decentralize the educational institution because the highly centralized system was notoriously rigid, inefficient, conflict laden, unresponsive to the needs of local schools, unable to improve the quality of education, and frequently dominated by the National Teachers’ Union. The decentralization reform generated important institutional change in the states, some power shifts, and planted the seeds of a new organizational model for school management.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Maria Teresa Tatto

After Jomtien1 under the goal of providing “education for all” a great number of countries made a strong commitment to extend the benefits of education to the poorest…

Abstract

After Jomtien1 under the goal of providing “education for all” a great number of countries made a strong commitment to extend the benefits of education to the poorest sectors of their population. Efforts have been made in the following years to fulfill this promise. But the issues associated with understanding and addressing disadvantaged populations are multiple and complex. Moreover the strategies followed by a number of countries have been framed under structural assumptions inherently limiting and undermining the intentions of the policies that gave them origin. Seeking to understand the challenges and complexities of change in these contexts, I analyze Mexico's assumptions framing educational policy toward the rural and indigenous poor.2 I argue that a number of initiatives may fail to fully address the needs of these populations due to the assumptions underlying these policies which end up resting agency to the poor, their children, and to their teachers and schools. After describing the theoretical framework used in this chapter and providing a brief description of Mexico's political economy, I examine Mexico's past and current government policies toward the poor and look at the spaces that have opened up for innovation due to growing relationships with the global economy and the global community and to relationships between Mexico's central and local governments. I suggest that compulsory early childhood education is one obvious avenue (complementing policies such as Federalizacion and teacher education) to correct centuries of injustice and neglect. I discuss the implications of this analysis within the context of the current decentralization movement and the growing discontent among the rural poor.

Details

Suffer The Little Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-831-6

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2007

Christopher Martin

The paper examines 15 years of basic educational reform in Mexico directed at improving scholastic performance, equity and education for all (EFA), through mainly…

Abstract

The paper examines 15 years of basic educational reform in Mexico directed at improving scholastic performance, equity and education for all (EFA), through mainly administrative measures, particularly decentralization. Taking a critical policy studies approach informed by anthropological examination of local educational processes, this chapter takes issue with scholarship that sees educational reforms in LDC's as the product of “decision makers” and the school reality as a deficit to be filled by “policy”. This perspective mirrors the characteristically top down approach of the very reform process it is supposed to be analyzing. The approach taken in this paper treats school district persons and institutions as active agents in their own right. More specifically the paper will argue that Mexican reforms toward EFA have been unable to transcend the very corporatist–personalistic structures it avowedly sought to reform. It has thus been largely ineffective in mobilizing forces for change, the goodwill, creativity and initiative of educators so important to its avowed aim of improving student scholastic performance. However, isolated examples of innovative uses of spaces opened by the reform offer ideas about how to reorient the reform in more productive directions.

Details

Education for All
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1441-6

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2007

Teresa Bracho and Arcelia Martínez

Among the compromises raised at the Education for All Conference held at Jomtien, Thailand, in 1990, and signed by Mexico and the rest of the countries that attended this…

Abstract

Among the compromises raised at the Education for All Conference held at Jomtien, Thailand, in 1990, and signed by Mexico and the rest of the countries that attended this Conference, were the reduction of the adult illiteracy rate by the year 2000, with sufficient emphasis on female literacy; and the expansion of provisions of basic education and training in other essential skills required by youth and adults, with program effectiveness assessed in terms of behavioral changes and impacts on health, employment and productivity. Based on a general revision of the things that the National Institute for Adult Education (INEA) reports have been its main policies and programs in the last few years, and on the results of a formative evaluation of the so-called “Programa Cero Rezago Educativo” (Zero Educational Delay Program), this chapter discusses some of the main strengths, weaknesses and challenges faced by INEA in order to address the compromises acquired more than 15 years ago.

Details

Education for All
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1441-6

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Michael F.C. Bourdillon, Ben White and William E. Myers

The purpose of this paper is to call for re‐thinking of the universal minimum‐age approach to problems of child labour.

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1392

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to call for re‐thinking of the universal minimum‐age approach to problems of child labour.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors point out that there has been no serious policy analysis on universal minimum‐age approaches, and question common assumptions concerning such policies by reviewing available knowledge on the impact of work on children.

Findings

Available research does not support a presumption that blanket minimum‐age laws are beneficial. In some cases, it is clear that they are injurious to children, underlining the need for systematic policy analysis.

Practical implications

The promotion of universalized minimum‐age policies should cease until their effect on children has been reliably assessed. In the meantime, more energy and investment should be devoted to alternative, proven ways of combating forms and conditions of work that are genuinely likely to cause harm, and to promoting access to education.

Originality/value

This paper contributes towards introducing more appropriate policy on children's work.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 29 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Tony Muhumuza

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between access to rural product markets and the extent and nature of child labor. It is built on the view that if…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between access to rural product markets and the extent and nature of child labor. It is built on the view that if physical markets can shape rural development through, for instance, influencing prices, household production decisions, and employment, the associated activity growth could increase child labor.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Uganda National Household Survey, the author combines two methodological approaches: first, a probit model to estimate the probability of a child engaging in labor, and second, a double-hurdle model to analyze the hours of child work.

Findings

The author finds that children increase time in domestic work when local product markets are distant, while their time in economic activity declines. A similar pattern is observed for the incidence of child labor. The likelihood of child labor in domestic activity increases for each extra hour of travel to the market, while child labor in economic activity declines. This could reflect the possibility that households may switch child work from market-oriented activities to domestic work when they are remotely located from markets. Results confirm findings from earlier cross-country studies that access to product markets may be detrimental to children. Second, they demonstrate that the effect of the markets varies, depending on the age of children, as well as the nature of the work they engage in.

Originality/value

No part of this work has been published anywhere before.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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