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Article

Bas P. Singer, Bart A.G. Bossink and Herman J.M. Vande Putte

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organisations use a corporate real estate strategy to support their competitive strategy. It provides a theoretical and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organisations use a corporate real estate strategy to support their competitive strategy. It provides a theoretical and empirical overview and analysis of effective combinations of firms' real estate and competitive strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper constructs a model that integrates three real estate strategies and three types of competitive strategies. Case studies in ten multinational firms in The Netherlands apply the model, and describe and analyse the combinations of the firms' real estate – and competitive strategies.

Findings

A standardisation real estate strategy supports all three competitive strategies: lowest costs, differentiation, and focus. A value‐based real estate strategy supports a competitive strategy of differentiation and differentiation‐focus, and does not contribute to a competitive strategy of lowest costs, or lowest costs‐focus. Finally, an incremental real estate strategy is ambiguous, and does not support any of the three competitive strategies.

Originality/value

The paper constructs a literature‐based model that combines real estate strategy and competitive strategy. It applies the model in a study of ten cases. Practitioners can use the model to analyse and reconsider the combination of their organisation's real estate strategy and competitive strategy. Academics can use the qualitative research results to design further research that qualifies and quantifies the relationship between various elements of real estate – and competitive strategy.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article

Fernando C.A. Santos

This article investigates the relationship between the functional areas of manufacturing and human resources by analysing the practices of human resource management…

Abstract

This article investigates the relationship between the functional areas of manufacturing and human resources by analysing the practices of human resource management associated with the competitive priorities of manufacturing strategy, e.g. quality, delivery performance, flexibility and cost. Within strategic business management, both the competitive priorities of manufacturing and the practices of human resource management need to be observed by the whole organisation. In this way, this study presents how human resource management practices are aligned to business strategies based on cost reduction, quality, delivery performance and product innovation. These practices may also be arranged in different ways in a particular competitive strategy.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Cristina Jönsson and Dwayne Devonish

The purpose of this paper is to examine a typology of competitive strategies, which has not been extensively researched in the context of the accommodation sector in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a typology of competitive strategies, which has not been extensively researched in the context of the accommodation sector in Barbados, a small developing island state in the Caribbean.

Design/methodology/approach

Data is collected through self‐administered questionnaires from 51 per cent of the hotels in Barbados. Respondents are Human Resource Managers, General Managers or Managing Directors.

Findings

Hotels in the five‐star and higher category place substantial strategic focus in the area of defining service standards and performance, as compared with hotels in the one‐star category. This study suggests that hoteliers should focus on a combination of different strategies advanced by Vandermerwe et al. as a means of securing a competitive advantage. Changes in strategy should be accompanied by training employees as the service and the quality of hotels change. As their customers' demands change, and as the competition changes, the competitive strategies of hotels will change.

Research limitations/implications

Due to cultural differences among the islands in the Caribbean, the findings in this study need to be confirmed by undertaking similar investigations in other islands. Future research should consider the use of a more qualitative approach to better understand the nature of these competitive strategies in the hotel sector. Future research should examine the link between these strategies and company performance in order to determine the best combination of competitive strategies needed for maximum organisational performance.

Practical implications

This study highlights many challenges to be met and opportunities to be seized by managers in Barbados's accommodation sector. Systematically linking different strategies highlighted by Vandermerwe et al. and proactively managing the hotel is one way to do both.

Originality/value

Few studies in this area have been undertaken in small developing island states in the Caribbean. This study attempts to fill this gap by comparing and contrasting the competitive business strategies employed by hotels in Barbados.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article

Yahya N. Al Serhan, Craig C. Julian and Zafar U. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to develop and justify a theoretical framework for analyzing the relationship between manufacturing strategy, business strategy, time-based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and justify a theoretical framework for analyzing the relationship between manufacturing strategy, business strategy, time-based manufacturing competence, capability and competitiveness and their impact on firm performance for firms operating in the manufacturing sector. Many executives and scholars have argued that time is an important component for developing a brilliant strategy to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage for the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a theoretical framework primarily concerned with the relationship between time-based manufacturing competence, competitive priorities and firm performance. The framework suggests that firms focusing on time as a strategic factor at both strategic levels – business strategy and manufacturing strategy – can achieve a multi-competitive advantage, and, in turn, high performance.

Findings

To realize the level of performance associated with time-based manufacturing competence, it is essential for firms to identify the areas in which time can be reduced. These include reduction in design lead time, product concept to production; time-based competition for product-to-market firms; time-based manufacturing competence; product development activities; fast-to-product; and customer service.

Originality/value

This article provides a theoretical framework for linking manufacturing strategy to business strategy and performance to help expand the body of knowledge for other researchers to follow.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

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Article

William A. Drago

This study investigates the relationship between a firm's competitive strategy and strategic plan intensity, defined as the emphasis placed on strategic planning in…

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between a firm's competitive strategy and strategic plan intensity, defined as the emphasis placed on strategic planning in guiding the future decisions and activities carried out by organisational members. The research question addressed is “Under what competitive strategy contexts does high strategic plan intensity lead to greater performance?” The competitive strategies considered are low‐cost, differentiation and competitive strategy segmentation. Strategic plan intensity is viewed as the combined emphasis a firm places on mission/vision, long‐term objectives, planned activities, short‐term objectives and policies in guiding the decisions and activities of organisation members.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 19 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Inêz Manuele dos Santos, Caroline Maria de Miranda Mota and Luciana Hazin Alencar

This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to integrate a maturity model to the supply chain (SC) strategy, in order to understand how a maturity model can be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to integrate a maturity model to the supply chain (SC) strategy, in order to understand how a maturity model can be useful in diagnosing and developing the capabilities of SC business processes (BPs) to meet SC's strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed framework was based on an SC strategy framework, in which a maturity model was added in order to diagnose and identify SC process capabilities that need to be developed, per maturity level, according to the type of SC strategy and the competitive strategy. A grid was proposed to analyze the relationship between them. An exploratory case study (multiple cases) was applied to verify the applicability of the model.

Findings

Findings indicate that a maturity model can delimit and align, as far as the company needs to reach, the SC strategic interests with the company's competitive objectives. However, some barriers and facilitating factors implicit can impact on this alignment. It is also noted that the maximum level of SC management (SCM) maturity may not be in the strategic interest of the company.

Originality/value

Due to the few empirical studies on the value of maturity models, this research contributes to the understanding of the usefulness of an SC process maturity model for the SC strategy. Moreover, the framework can show how a maturity model can serve as a parameter and guide to develop the capabilities of processes, resources and activities to meet the SC strategy and the reach of the competitive strategy.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article

Gabriela Lobo Veiga, Edson Pinheiro de Lima, José Roberto Frega and Sergio E. Gouvea da Costa

To investigate the relationship between performance frontier and operations strategy. A two-level conceptual framework is proposed based on performance elements that act…

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the relationship between performance frontier and operations strategy. A two-level conceptual framework is proposed based on performance elements that act as output/input variables and delimit the scope of the frontier analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework proposition is based on the fourth round of high-performance manufacturing survey data. A representative set of variables for assessing performance based on operations strategy constructs is defined through multivariate data analysis techniques. The main method used is the principal component analysis.

Findings

The proposed first-level conceptual framework formalizes the relationships between performance frontier analysis techniques and operations strategy, delimiting the scope and the structural definitions. The second-level conceptual framework defines the constructs of the input and output dimensions for frontier analysis studies.

Originality/value

The paper contribution is developed in the gap of market-led orientation to study operations strategy performance frontier since most related literature focuses on capabilities development with a main focus on the resource-based view (RBV) approach. A conceptual framework based on the competitive priorities is therefore proposed to represent the operations strategy in the view of the frontier techniques. The value lies in defining performance measures which are not a straightforward task as the growth of organization competitiveness and complexity require multiple performance measures. A deeper understanding of frontier estimation on the operations strategy context is also provided, contributing to positively influence firms to succeed in the current dynamic competitive environments.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part

Yeşim Koçyiğit and Akif Tabak

Decisions about strategies to be implemented and organization design are important in having competitive advantage for companies. Although this statement widely takes…

Abstract

Decisions about strategies to be implemented and organization design are important in having competitive advantage for companies. Although this statement widely takes place in management literature, very little research has been done on this subject in Turkey. The aim of this study is to examine the mediating role of competitive strategies in the impact of organizational flexibility on competitive advantage in order to extend about empirical literature of the structure-strategy-competitive advantage paradigm based on the resource-based view (RBV). In this context, the data were collected from the top 500 industrial enterprises in Turkey. The data were tested via structural equation model. The findings of our research show that the direct effect of organizational flexibility on competitive superiority was marginally significant and when three different competitive strategies were included between these two variables in the model, the marginally significant effect of organizational flexibility on the competitive advantage disappeared. In other words, the full mediating role of applied competition strategies in the effect of organizational flexibility on competitive advantage has been identified. Our findings are similar to the findings of other studies that consider organizational structure as a valuable resource and examine the relationship between the structure and the strategy according to the RBV.

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Article

Saumyaranjan Sahoo

The main purpose of this study is to understand how collective operational practices are adapted or stimulated by a firm's competitive strategy.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to understand how collective operational practices are adapted or stimulated by a firm's competitive strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a data set drawn from 124 plant managers and directors of Indian manufacturing firms. Multiple regression was used to examine the impact of operational practices of lean, total quality management (TQM) and supply chain management (SCM) within competitive clusters of cost leadership, differentiation and focus strategy.

Findings

Results of the study show that the pattern of impact of operational practices on firm's performance varies according to type of the competitive strategy employed. All the three competitive strategy clusters have reported that TQM is the most important trigger for Indian manufacturing firms with relative effect of TQM practices on firm's performance being higher than that of lean and SCM practices.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-sectional data from Indian manufacturing firms were used, and it would be interesting to test the analytical framework of the study for more sectors and countries. Future studies can take a longitudinal research approach to strengthen the findings of the study.

Practical implications

The findings explain how operational practices are aligned with competitive strategies for practitioners so that they can assign limited resources to build diverse operational capabilities based on their strategic choices.

Originality/value

Although very few classical studies are reported in various contexts involving competitive strategy, operational practices and firm's performance, no existing study focuses on how these three domains are linked together in the context of Indian manufacturing sector.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article

Noorlailie Soewarno and Bambang Tjahjadi

This study aims to explore the mediating role of strategy. First, we examine whether strategy mediates the relationship between competitive pressure and SPM. Second, we…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the mediating role of strategy. First, we examine whether strategy mediates the relationship between competitive pressure and SPM. Second, we examine whether the strategy mediates the relationship between stakeholder pressure and SPM.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is designed as a quantitative study by utilizing partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) in order to test the hypotheses. A mediation model for the research framework was developed to investigate the mediating role of strategy.

Findings

Using a sample of 546 managers from higher education institutions (HEIs) in Indonesia, the results show that both competitive pressure and stakeholder pressure have a positive direct effect on SPM. Strategy fully mediates the relationship between competitive pressure and SPM and strategy also partially mediates the relationship between stakeholder pressure and SPM. The findings suggest that the management of the HEIs in Indonesia needs to accommodate the dynamic trends in the competitive environment and the stakeholder’s interests when they develop the strategy used. They need to build a reliable SPM to effectively execute the strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This study has the following limitations: (1) the use of PLS-SEM may raise the issue of causality; (2) this study focuses only on the antecedents of the SPM, and therefore future studies should investigate the consequences of the SPM on other variables; (3) this study is context-specific for Indonesia and caution should be used when generalizing it to other countries; (5) this study employs the primary data that may raise the issue of perception bias, and therefore future studies should try to develop proxies of variables using secondary data.

Practical implications

This research provides a comprehensive understanding of the management of HEIs who wants to enhance their SPM. This suggests that management needs to verify the role of strategy. In the era of global competition in higher education, management needs to start from the dynamics of competitive intensity and stakeholder interest. Competition and cooperation need to be considered in their strategies if they want to survive in the higher education industry. Finally, management must be aware that they are now assessed using quantitative indicators, standardized processes, and algorithms, and therefore they need to have a more reliable SPM.

Social implications

As the global competition increases in higher education, this research provides a model on how to improve the good university governance involving the strategy and the SPM. Higher education plays an extremely important role in society. This study provides a model that can be used by society to have better control of the HEIs by demanding improved good governance. This research provides empirical evidence of the importance of the strategy and the SPM. The society will get more benefits in terms of improved transparency, accountability, fairness, and responsibility of the HEIs.

Originality/value

This is the first study that explores the links between competitive pressure, stakeholder pressure, strategy and SPM in Indonesian HEIs. It provides empirical evidence in the HEIs research setting for the industry/organization (I/O) theory of competitive advantage which focuses on the external factors. It also supports the resource-based view (RBV) model of competitive advantage which focuses on internal factors.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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