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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Andrzej Marian Swiatkowski

collective action in case of a collective labour conflict. Poland ratified the Charter in 1997, that is seventeen years after the world‐famous Polish Independent and…

Abstract

collective action in case of a collective labour conflict. Poland ratified the Charter in 1997, that is seventeen years after the world‐famous Polish Independent and Self‐Governing Trade Union Solidarity had been established. In order to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the Union, I shall present a fragment of a monograph on the European Social Charter and, more specifically, on the right of workers to organise and participate in strikes. By means of the aforementioned regulation, both parties of collective employment relationships (workers and employers) were granted the right to take collective action

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Managerial Law, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

George K. Chacko

Gives an in depth view of the strategies pursued by the world’s leading chief executive officers in an attempt to provide guidance to new chief executives of today…

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7669

Abstract

Gives an in depth view of the strategies pursued by the world’s leading chief executive officers in an attempt to provide guidance to new chief executives of today. Considers the marketing strategies employed, together with the organizational structures used and looks at the universal concepts that can be applied to any product. Uses anecdotal evidence to formulate a number of theories which can be used to compare your company with the best in the world. Presents initial survival strategies and then looks at ways companies can broaden their boundaries through manipulation and choice. Covers a huge variety of case studies and examples together with a substantial question and answer section.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 11 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Rashid Ameer

This paper explores attractiveness of stocks on Karachi Stock Exchange using event study methodology. The main findings of this paper are KSE 100 has included small share…

Abstract

This paper explores attractiveness of stocks on Karachi Stock Exchange using event study methodology. The main findings of this paper are KSE 100 has included small share capital base manufacturing companies during 2000‐2002. There is no significant difference in pre tax profitability of companies included (excluded) except for their capital structures. The results from event study seem to suggest that KSE100 stocks would be more attractive to passive investors. The passive investors tracking moderate beta stocks on KSE100 index are better off until beta of the stocks climbs up.

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Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Terence Allen Edwards

Presents CLEAR, which stands for “community learning empowerment and resources”, a project led by the City of Bath College (UK) as a global consortium of interested groups…

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634

Abstract

Presents CLEAR, which stands for “community learning empowerment and resources”, a project led by the City of Bath College (UK) as a global consortium of interested groups in Austria, Finland, Hong Kong, Ireland, Japan, Romania, Thailand, and the USA. Discusses the exploitation of advances in information and communications technology (ICT) to improve the quality, scale, diversity and economy of access to education and training as a fundamental contribution to sustaining and regenerating the economic and cultural lives of the localities involved. It forms 9 community learning utilities which exploit new ICT to create widespread, affordable access to education and training resources using virtual educational mobility (VEM) for all who wish to learn, including those whose access is presently disadvantaged by their condition. Addresses the problems for project management of a telematic world of unavoidably very short time horizons.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

David Bojorquez and Brian H. Kleiner

During the past few years there has been an increase in the number of claims filed at the EEOC. There has also been an increase in the number of discrimination suits based…

Abstract

During the past few years there has been an increase in the number of claims filed at the EEOC. There has also been an increase in the number of discrimination suits based on national origin, religion, and age bias. Recent settlements against Ford Motor Company and Johnson Higgins also show that the monetary threat to employers is on the rise. This increase in claims and settlements coincides with changes that have been made to the legislation and guidelines that the EEOC follow. In 2003, the EEOC added new and additional guidelines on national origin discrimination. It is increasingly important that managers review and understand EEOC guidelines about discrimination. With a thorough understanding managers can limit, mediate, and possibly prevent discrimination claims within their organisation.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 24 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Brian H. Kleiner

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the…

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Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the evidence down into manageable chunks, covering: age discrimination in the workplace; discrimination against African‐Americans; sex discrimination in the workplace; same sex sexual harassment; how to investigate and prove disability discrimination; sexual harassment in the military; when the main US job‐discrimination law applies to small companies; how to investigate and prove racial discrimination; developments concerning race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; developments concerning discrimination against workers with HIV or AIDS; developments concerning discrimination based on refusal of family care leave; developments concerning discrimination against gay or lesbian employees; developments concerning discrimination based on colour; how to investigate and prove discrimination concerning based on colour; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; using statistics in employment discrimination cases; race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning gender discrimination in the workplace; discrimination in Japanese organizations in America; discrimination in the entertainment industry; discrimination in the utility industry; understanding and effectively managing national origin discrimination; how to investigate and prove hiring discrimination based on colour; and, finally, how to investigate sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2018

Jarle Lowe Sorensen, Eric D. Carlström, Leif Inge Magnussen, Tae-eun Kim, Atle Martin Christiansen and Glenn-Egil Torgersen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived effects of a maritime cross-sector collaboration exercise. More specifically, this study aims to examine whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived effects of a maritime cross-sector collaboration exercise. More specifically, this study aims to examine whether past exercise experience had an impact on the operative exercise participant’s perceived levels of collaboration, learning and usefulness.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a non-experimental quantitative survey-based study. A quantitative methodology was chosen over qualitative or mixed-methods methodologies as it was considered more suitable for data extraction from larger population groups, and allowed for the measurement and testing of variables using statistical methods and procedures (McCusker and Gunaydin, 2015). Data were collected from a two-day 2017 Norwegian full-scale maritime chemical oil-spill pollution exercise with partners from Norway, Germany, Iceland, Denmark and Sweden. The exercise included international public emergency response organizations and Norwegian non-governmental organizations. The study was approved by the Norwegian Centre for Research Data (ref. 44815) and the exercise planning organization. Data were collected using the collaboration, learning and utility (CLU) scale, which is a validated instrument designed to measure exercise participant’s perceived levels of collaboration, learning and usefulness (Berlin and Carlström, 2015).

Findings

The perceived focus on collaboration, learning and usefulness changed with the number of previous exercises attended. All CLU dimensions experienced decreases and increases, but while perceived levels of collaboration and utility reached their somewhat modest peaks among those with the most exercise experience, perceived learning was at its highest among those with none or little exercise experience, and at its lowest among those with most. These findings indicated that collaboration exercises in their current form have too little focus on collaborative learning.

Research limitations/implications

Several limitations of the current study deserve to be mentioned. First, this study was limited in scope as data were collected from a limited number of participants belonging to only one organization and during one exercise. Second, demographical variables such as age and gender were not taken into consideration. Third, limitation in performing a face-to-face data collection may have resulted in missing capturing of cues, verbal and non-verbal signs, which could have resulted in a more accurate screening. Moreover, the measurements were based on the predefined CLU-items, which left room for individual interpretation and, in turn, may cause somewhat lower term validity. As the number of international and national studies on exercise effects is scarce, it is important to increase further knowledge and to learn more about the causes as to why the perceived effects of collaboration exercises are considered somewhat limited.

Practical implications

Exercise designers may be stimulated to have a stronger emphasis on collaborative learning during exercise planning, hence continuously work to develop scripts and scenarios in a way that leads to continuous participant perceived learning and utility.

Social implications

Collaboration is established as a Norwegian national emergency preparedness principle. These findings may stimulate politicians and top crisis managers to develop national collaboration exercise script guidelines that emphasize collaborative learning and development.

Originality/value

This study shows how exercise experience impacted participant’s perceived levels of collaboration, learning and usefulness. Findings indicated that collaboration exercises in their current form have too little focus on collaborative learning.

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International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of…

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10456

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Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

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Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Umberto Carabelli and Vito Leccese

The paper aims to examine favor and non‐regression clauses, appearing ‐ in several occasionsjointly ‐ in European Community social directives, in order to underline the…

Abstract

The paper aims to examine favor and non‐regression clauses, appearing ‐ in several occasions jointly ‐ in European Community social directives, in order to underline the differences in their nature, function and effects on Member States’ legislation, also considering that the favour clause is now present in the article 137 of the Treaty.

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Managerial Law, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Elizabeth F. Goldreyer, Parvez Ahmed and J. David Diltz

Outlines increased interest from investors in corporate social policies over the last ten years and previous research comparing the investment performance of “socially…

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2658

Abstract

Outlines increased interest from investors in corporate social policies over the last ten years and previous research comparing the investment performance of “socially responsible” (SR) portfolios with others. Measures performance for a US sample of SR and conventional mutual funds using a variety of methods (including Jensen’s Alpha, the Sharpe Ratio and the Treynor ratio), analysing the funds by investment strategy, size, systematic risk and the use of inclusion screens. Presents the results, which do not give a clear advantage to either group, but show that funds with inclusion screens consistently outperform those without. Calls for further research on the relationship between corporate social performance and portfolio performance and comparisons between SR and conventional funds.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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