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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

CLIVE COCHRANE

The National Film Archive (NFA) was established in 1935 to collect and preserve film. In the preceding decades the new medium was beginning to make its impact on society…

Abstract

The National Film Archive (NFA) was established in 1935 to collect and preserve film. In the preceding decades the new medium was beginning to make its impact on society and the NFA was faced with the formidable task of preserving the nation's moving image heritage. With the passage of time more formats were developed and production increased, creating problems for the NFA and the other collections, especially regional and special archives, which had been established. As film, television and video grew in importance demands for greater access to archives and libraries increased as new user groups challenged the status quo. This paper reviews the trends in the collection and use of moving images during the fifty year period between 1935 and 1985, concentrating on non‐fiction material.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

Clive Cochrane

On 4 May 1979 Margaret Thatcher became Prime Minster. For the first time general election results were disseminated by teletext. On the same day the use of a teletext…

Abstract

On 4 May 1979 Margaret Thatcher became Prime Minster. For the first time general election results were disseminated by teletext. On the same day the use of a teletext receiver was observed in Belfast Public Library. This article indicates the behaviour of user groups, the range of information obtained and the problems users encountered, and ends with a brief analysis of the election day news broadcast by Ceefax and Oracle respectively. The need for further research in this area by librarians and information scientists is stressed.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Anne Davies, Albert J. Titterington and Clive Cochrane

A series of studies, conducted over the period 1989 to 1993, basedon actual purchasing patterns, seeks to quantify the extent of purchaseof organic food and the consumer′s…

Abstract

A series of studies, conducted over the period 1989 to 1993, based on actual purchasing patterns, seeks to quantify the extent of purchase of organic food and the consumer′s commitment. The most commonly expressed motives for purchasing organic food have become consideration for the environment and health reasons. Availability and price are the chief factors which inhibit the purchase of organic food. A profile of actual purchasers of organic produce shows them to be female aged 30‐45, with children and having a higher level of disposable income. This research has demonstrated that the primary factor in organic food purchase is the consumer′s level of personal disposable income. There would appear to be a distinction between those who claim to be interested in the environment and those who regularly buy organic products.

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British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Vicki N. Tariq, Eileen M. Scott, A. Clive Cochrane, Maria Lee and Linda Ryles

Universities are encouraged to embed key skills in their undergraduate curricula, yet there is often little support on how to identify skills development and progression…

Abstract

Universities are encouraged to embed key skills in their undergraduate curricula, yet there is often little support on how to identify skills development and progression. This paper describes a tool that facilitates colleagues in auditing key skills and career/employability skills within individual modules and mapping these skills across degree pathways. The instrument presented supports a systematic approach to collect information on skills development. It enables tutors to highlight those skills students have the opportunity to develop or practise within a module, and to record for each skill whether explicit learner support is provided, whether the skill is assessed, and the desired standard of proficiency. The latter is identified from descriptors defined for three standards. Data collected for all modules within a degree pathway may subsequently be summarised (mapped). The tool provides valuable summary data for institutional quality assurance purposes and facilitates reflection on how to enhance students' learning experiences.

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Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Clive Tobutt and Raffaella Milani

The aim of this randomised intervention study was to test the use of two counselling styles in reducing alcohol consumption in offenders who were hazardous drinkers and…

Abstract

The aim of this randomised intervention study was to test the use of two counselling styles in reducing alcohol consumption in offenders who were hazardous drinkers and who had been charged with alcohol‐related offences. An additional aim was to evaluate the research process itself before embarking on a larger trial. Participants were recruited from a police custody suite in the south east of England and randomised to receive either a motivational interviewing brief intervention (MIBI) or a standard brief intervention (BI). The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) was used to screen offenders for hazardous drinking. Participants were asked to complete a second AUDIT 12 weeks later. Two hundred offenders with alcohol‐related offences were screened over a 10‐month period. Of these, 182 were alcohol dependent and were therefore excluded from the study. Of the 18 who were eligible to enter the study, six refused to participate. Five were randomised to the MIBI group and seven into the BI group (BI). The mean age of the MIBI group was 25 (SD±3.86) years and the mean age of the BI group was 32.4 (SD±7.9). Audit scores were significantly lower at time 2 compared to time 1 for both intervention groups (t(11) = 17.60; p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the different intervention groups.

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Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Clive Long and Kelly Jones

Although smoking is a major health problem among forensic psychiatric inpatient populations, a multitude of factors (motivational, environmental, procedural and…

Abstract

Although smoking is a major health problem among forensic psychiatric inpatient populations, a multitude of factors (motivational, environmental, procedural and psychiatric) militate against effective treatment. Despite this, few studies have reported on the use of population‐appropriate treatment approaches. This pilot study reports the results of group and individual treatments involving combination nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), motivational enhancement therapy (MET) and cognitive behavioural treatment. The importance of selecting patients with some skills in emotional regulation is highlighted, along with ways of reducing institutional obstacles to change and maximising environmental support for quit attempts.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sacha Evans, Faisil Sethi, Oliver Dale, Clive Stanton, Rosemary Sedgwick, Monica Doran, Lucinda Shoolbred, Steve Goldsack and Rex Haigh

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evolution of the field of personality disorder since the publication of “Personality disorder: no longer a diagnosis of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evolution of the field of personality disorder since the publication of “Personality disorder: no longer a diagnosis of exclusion” in 2003.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of both the academic literature contained within relevant databases alongside manual searches of policy literature and guidance from the key stakeholders was undertaken.

Findings

The academic and policy literature concentrates on treating borderline and antisocial personality disorders. It seems unlikely that evidence will resolutely support any one treatment modality over another. Criticism has arisen that comparison between modalities misses inter and intra patient heterogeneity and the measurement of intervention has become conflated with overall service design and the need for robust care pathways. Apparent inconsistency in service availability remains, despite a wealth of evidence demonstrating the availability of cost-effective interventions and the significant inequality of social and health outcomes for this population.

Research limitations/implications

The inclusion of heterogeneous sources required pragmatic compromises in methodological rigour.

Originality/value

This paper charts the recent developments in the field with a wealth of wide-ranging evidence and robust guidance from institutions such as NICE. The policy literature has supported the findings of this evidence but current clinical practice and what patients and carers can expect from services remains at odds. This paper lays bare the disparity between what we know and what is being delivered. The authors argue for the need for greater research into current practice to inform the setting of minimum standards for the treatment of personality disorder.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Steven J. Cochran and Robert H. DeFina

Several recent studies have indicated the existence of a predictable component in stock prices. This study examines the sources of this serial correlation using…

Abstract

Several recent studies have indicated the existence of a predictable component in stock prices. This study examines the sources of this serial correlation using error‐correction models. The results show that autocorrelated economic variables can generate serial correlation in stock returns. After these effects are accounted for, however, significant serial correlation in stock prices remains. The activities of noise traders and inefficiencies in the pricing of securities, within the context of limitations to the arbitrage process, are suggested as additional sources of serial correlation in stock prices.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Graeme Tosh, Andrew Clifton and Clive Adams

In recent years there has been an increasing focus on improving the physical health of people with serious mental illness and many policies and guidelines are now tailored…

Abstract

In recent years there has been an increasing focus on improving the physical health of people with serious mental illness and many policies and guidelines are now tailored to support professionals working in mental health services to meet these requirements. We found, however, that the physical health care policies produced by mental health trusts in England varied enormously. Policies were often cumbersome, vague and lacked clear guidance on what particular action should be taken, when it should be taken, and by whom. Physical health care policy documents of three mental health care trusts in the north sector of the East Midlands Strategic Health Authority (UK) were examined in detail. We found significant disparities between the policies in terms of size, readability, external references and reading cost. None could be read swiftly and all incorporated vague language into their directives. It would be beneficial for there to be more consideration given to forming local policies that are readable, succinct, and unambiguous. There is potential for considerable economy of effort with collaboration in production of these documents.

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871…

Abstract

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that date two extensions to the building have taken place. The first, in 1882, provided a separate room for both Reference and Lending libraries; the second, opened in 1938, provided a new Children's Department. Together with the original cost of the building, these extensions were entirely financed by Sir Peter Coats, James Coats of Auchendrane and Daniel Coats respectively. The people of Paisley indeed owe much to this one family, whose generosity was great. They not only provided the capital required but continued to donate many useful and often extremely valuable works of reference over the many years that followed. In 1975 Paisley Library was incorporated in the new Renfrew District library service.

Details

Library Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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