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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Chin‐Tarn Lee, Szu‐Chi Yang and Henry Y. Lo

This study is interested in the tourist satisfaction of Kenting Wind Chime Festival, as well as in tourist's characteristic and their revisiting commitment. The purpose is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is interested in the tourist satisfaction of Kenting Wind Chime Festival, as well as in tourist's characteristic and their revisiting commitment. The purpose is to survey customer satisfaction, which has significant implications for the economic performance of the firm, and to focus on local festival activity. Since 1994, Taiwan has continuously promoted festival activities, and the 2006 Kenting Wind Chime Festival is the first of 12 major festivals selected for promotion by Taiwan Tourism Bureau.

Design/methodology/approach

ANOVA analysis was applicable for the inference relationships among tourist characteristics, satisfaction, and revisiting commitment. Additionally, it was supplemented by open questions interviews. The survey period was from January 21 to February 12, 2006.

Findings

Three findings have been concluded in this survey. First, the 2006 Wind‐Chime Festival tourists are mostly coming with their families, and they are first‐time visitors, who have received information from television and network, and had plans in advance. Second, for festival activity, local show is more popular than theme part equipments. Finally, it must be emphasized that local damper (e.g. mountain tempest) is not passive bounded.

Research limitations/implications

On the one hand, the 216 subjects are restricted to family, and the inference will be limited. On the other, the single item to collect data for understanding the tourists' satisfaction in Wind Chime Festival was used.

Practical implications

Managers should develop the completely understanding of media, because most tourists are influenced by television and networks.

Originality/value

The paper shows that customer‐oriented and integrative tourism programs improve tourist satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Robert Hurst and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this paper is to review the 20 remarkable lives of student accounts published in this journal. These recovery narratives (RNs) are examined first in terms…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the 20 remarkable lives of student accounts published in this journal. These recovery narratives (RNs) are examined first in terms of whether they meet the five elements of the connectedness, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment (CHIME) model of recovery and then in terms of what makes each account remarkable.

Design/methodology/approach

Two Excel spreadsheets were created. One had each author’s name and the five elements of the CHIME model, the other the features of a remarkable life.

Findings

All 20 accounts fulfilled the criteria for the CHIME model, independently validating this model of recovery. Hence, each account showed evidence of connectedness, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment. A number of additional characteristics stood out from the accounts such as the importance of motherhood and of education.

Research limitations/implications

All 20 accounts were only reviewed by the two authors, who may be subject to bias. To reduce this, the first author did the bulk of the ratings. This paper shows the importance of education for recovery.

Practical implications

Some 15/20 accounts reported problems with mental health services, mainly around waiting lists. Must mental health always remain a Cinderella service?

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to synthesise this particular set of recovery narratives, entitled remarkable lives. These accounts show the richness of the recovery journeys embarked on by many sufferers and these are just drawn from one University. Like the authors of these stories, we too as recovery specialists have much to learn from their inspiring accounts.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Grace Zeng and Donna Chung

Previous studies have pointed the need for more research, which explores how peer provision brings about change associated with recovery. This study aims to test Leamy’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have pointed the need for more research, which explores how peer provision brings about change associated with recovery. This study aims to test Leamy’s framework, which consists of five recovery processes: connectedness, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment (also known as the CHIME framework) within the peer provision context.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods study was completed in two stages. A total of 13 face-to-face interviews were conducted with peers and the transcripts were analysed thematically. A short online questionnaire was completed by 12 peers and analysed with both descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.

Findings

The participants spoke about the value of peer providers (PPs) in building connectedness, fostering hope and optimism, growing identity, enhancing meaning and empowerment (CHIME). However, their connectedness was hindered by external circumstances and the intrapersonal capacities of their PP.

Practical implications

The CHIME framework was useful in highlighting stages in which peers moved through their recovery and its corresponding PP involvement. PPs were also found to promote motivation, which was a key driver in their peers’ recoveries. Further research is needed to test frameworks that account for wider systemic issues and the role PPs play in enhancing motivation.

Originality/value

This study has identified the usefulness of the CHIME framework in describing peer provision. It contributes to our understanding of how peer provision can promote recovery in persons with mental health challenges. It lays the groundwork for future research into examining the role of peer provision in recovery and its distinctiveness from other forms of mental health support.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Myra Piat, Kimberly Seida and Judith Sabetti

The purpose of this paper is to understand how daily life reflects the recovery journeys of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) living independently in the community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how daily life reflects the recovery journeys of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) living independently in the community.

Design/methodology/approach

The go-along technique, which blends participant observation and interviewing, was used to gather data from 19 individuals with SMI living in supported housing. Data were analyzed through the CHIME framework of personal recovery, which includes social connectedness, hope and optimism, identity, meaning in life, and empowerment.

Findings

Applying the CHIME framework to qualitative data reveals the multiple ways in which everyday experiences, within and beyond formal mental healthcare environments, shapes personal recovery processes.

Research limitations/implications

Combining novel methods and conceptual frameworks to lived experiences sharpens extant knowledge of the active and non-linear aspects to personal recovery. The role of the researcher must be critically considered when using go-along methods.

Practical implications

Practitioners working with this population should account for the role of socially supportive and financially accessible spaces and activities that support the daily work of recovery beyond the context of formal care and services.

Originality/value

This study utilizes an innovative method to illustrate the crucial role of daily and seemingly banal experiences in fostering or hindering personal recovery processes. It is also the one of the first studies to comprehensively apply the CHIME framework to qualitative data in order to understand the recovery journeys of individuals with SMI living in supported housing.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Dagmar Narusson and Jean Pierre Wilken

The purpose of this paper is to focus on individuals who experience mental health difficulties with the services they receive from “support workers” as part of a personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on individuals who experience mental health difficulties with the services they receive from “support workers” as part of a personal recovery model, this study will obtain individuals reflections, experiences and opinions on how support helps them stay well and facilitates their personal recovery process. Recovery is seen through the lens of the CHIME framework (Connectedness–Hope–Identity–Meaning–Empowerment).

Design/methodology/approach

The sample size included 13 people who experience mental health difficulties and are receiving support from mental health care services. The structured interview was designed based on the INSPIRE measurement and the CHIME framework structure. The qualitative content analyses, discursive framing approach and CHIME as a framework made it possible to examine the key activities of recovery-oriented support work revealed in the data.

Findings

Participants valued the enhancement of hope provided by support workers and also expressed it was important as they were non-judgemental. Identity and meaning in recovery could be enhanced by sharing powerful stories about the individuals’ own life and health experiences, and those of support workers or others. Inclusive behaviour in public spaces and trying out new interest-based activities together were considered as empowering.

Originality/value

This research helps to understand the value of personal recovery support activities given the societal changes (tension between survival vs self-expression values) and highlights the need for value-based recovery-oriented education and practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Tim Sayers and Theodore Stickley

There is growing evidence of the contribution participatory arts practice may make towards mental health recovery. The purpose of this paper is to examine this phenomenon…

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing evidence of the contribution participatory arts practice may make towards mental health recovery. The purpose of this paper is to examine this phenomenon by critically reviewing the relevant literature in the light of the CHIME theoretical framework that identifies the components and processes of mental health recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a critical realist review method, the study draws upon foundational social and psychological theories offering an analysis of the identified mental health recovery processes in relation to participatory arts activities for people that use mental health services.

Findings

This review identifies themes that permeate the categories of CHIME and are widely delivered by participatory arts in mental health projects. These themes define the essence of a recovery approach of care and are delivered, sometimes uniquely, through arts in mental health work.

Originality/value

Whilst mental health outcomes are frequently sought in participatory arts projects, there is sparse theoretical evidence to under-pin such work. This review provides potential recovery outcomes through a theoretical inquiry into participatory arts and psychosocial theories.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Anita Jensen

Arts and cultural activities have been illustrated to be beneficial for mental health service users. The purpose of this paper is to explore the benefits of museum visits…

Abstract

Purpose

Arts and cultural activities have been illustrated to be beneficial for mental health service users. The purpose of this paper is to explore the benefits of museum visits and engage in arts activities for mental health service users.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 mental health service users in Denmark. A thematic approach was used to analyse the data and theoretical lens of sociological theories of institutional logics was employed to explore the findings.

Findings

These benefits are perceived to include empowerment and meaning in life, which are two of the core principles of recovery; arts engagement can, therefore, be a useful tool in recovery. The findings also show that the experience of visiting a museum was not always positive and depended upon the interaction with the museum educators.

Originality/value

The service users identified arts engagement as creating meaning in life and empowerment, which are two element in the conceptual framework, CHIME (an acronym for: Connectedness, Hope and optimism, Identity, Meaning in life and Empowerment), that describes the human process of recovery. The findings also highlighted that if museums want to engage positively with people with mental health problems and contribute to their recovery then the training of staff and the improvement of institutional approaches to support working with vulnerable people are essential.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Sharon Dotger and Deborah Walsh

– The purpose of this paper is to report on elementary students’ observational drawings, which were produced from two science lesson study cycles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on elementary students’ observational drawings, which were produced from two science lesson study cycles.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collaboratively studied student work from two science research lessons. The authors evaluated 50 students’ science notebook entries, paying specific attention to their observational sketches. The authors wanted to understand how fourth grade students approach observational drawing in science class to better inform science and art pedagogy.

Findings

Students represented their observations in a variety of ways. The structure of the lessons might have influenced students’ drawings, as did students’ orientation when constructing their representations.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited in that it only analyzes observational drawing from two research lessons.

Practical implications

Through cross-disciplinary collaboration between a science educator and an art teacher, the authors developed shared ideas that were applicable in both spaces. In the near term, the authors have each changed the instructional practices to include more observational drawing.

Social implications

This paper could impact public attitudes about the inclusion of science and art in the elementary curriculum. The authors would expect that through articulating the purpose of observational drawing for the artist and the scientist, the public would be more supportive of teaching these skills in school.

Originality/value

This paper documents teacher learning across two content areas which students have limited access to in the USA during elementary school. It explains how science and art share objectives and can thus advocate for each other’s inclusion in the school day.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Róisín Kearns, Nancy Salmon, Mairead Cahill and Eithne Egan

No occupational therapy outcome measures have been designed specifically for recovery-orientated services.This paper aims to identify occupational therapy outcome measures…

Abstract

Purpose

No occupational therapy outcome measures have been designed specifically for recovery-orientated services.This paper aims to identify occupational therapy outcome measures relevant to mental health practice and assess them against recovery principles adopted by Irish Mental Health Services.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review methodology was used to appraise outcome measures against CHIME recovery principles.

Findings

A systematic search across 13 databases identified eight well-established outcome measures commonly used within occupational therapy mental health literature. The included outcome measures were appraised using a recovery alignment tool.

Practical implications

All outcome measures connected to some recovery processes. Those using semi-structured interview formats and notably the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) had the strongest alignment to recovery processes.

Originality/value

This is the first known review which provides some validation that the included outcome measures support recovery processes, yet the measures rely heavily on therapist’s skills for processes to be facilitated. It recommends that ways to better support the process of partnership in occupational therapy mental health outcome measures be explored and further research be undertaken.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2020

Eleni Sofouli

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature in terms of the conceptualization of the recovery concept among cultural and ethnic minorities drawing on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature in terms of the conceptualization of the recovery concept among cultural and ethnic minorities drawing on the connectedness, hope and optimism about the future; Identity, meaning in life, empowerment (CHIME) framework; highlight the cultural adaptations of supported housing – a prominent recovery-oriented intervention, as it was implemented in a multicultural western country; and delineate the future implications for research, policy and practice in regard to mental health recovery interventions for cultural and ethnic minorities.

Design/methodology/approach

An online search was performed to identify recent empirical studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals.

Findings

Included studies confirmed what the authors of CHIME had initially reported: spirituality and support networks could act as enablers or inhibitors in the recovery process of mental health services users with diverse cultural backgrounds. The stigma surrounding mental illness is a key challenge that skews the recovery experience. Other cultural-specific factors include linguistic peculiarities of the maternal language and gender. The cultural adaptation of a recovery-oriented intervention was feasible and effective but also challenging.

Originality/value

By studying the cultural variations of mental health recovery, the intention is to inform mental health practitioners and other key stakeholders of the distinct cultural components that influence the recovery process, thereby promoting the development of culturally sensitive, accessible and effective recovery-oriented interventions. It is worth noting that providing culturally appropriate mental health services could be viewed as a human right issue for minority groups.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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