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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Barbara A. Workman

The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the higher education learning and teaching development strategies used to implement a university‐wide project to extend and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the higher education learning and teaching development strategies used to implement a university‐wide project to extend and embed work‐based learning (WBL) across all four university schools as part of a Centre for Excellence project in Teaching and Learning (CETL).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers the change and engagement strategies that were used and gives a flavour of the range of activities that were undertaken to integrate different modes of WBL into all the university schools. Different change approaches are considered in relation to how WBL pedagogies were adopted in different subject disciplines and are examples of approaches to introducing WBL into subject areas not previously involved. Factors which facilitated the embedding of WBL into subject disciplines will be considered in relation to the implications for future higher educational development projects. These factors include support and involvement at senior management level, the use of demonstrator projects within distinct areas as illustrations of good practice, and funding support from the Centre for Excellence for projects.

Findings

Effective embedding of WBL requires high‐level champions as well as innovators and risk takers who are educational developers to apply the change approaches within their own discipline in order to bring about change. Funding of educational evaluations and small projects encouraged engagement of educational developers.

Practical implications

Undertaking change in a higher education institution needs to consider the type of institution and the opportunities that present themselves through university policies and personal and professional networks, and to capitalise on the opportunities that are offered. Additionally, the use of funds and other inducements can ease reluctance to engage, and modelling of successful outcomes encourages further engagement.

Originality/value

This CETL was unusual in that it was pan‐university and endeavoured to share good practice and embed WBL across all subject disciplines. The paper demonstrates a range of change strategies that were used and offers practical examples of effective ways of involving a university in WBL.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

David John Laughton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the aims, objectives and approach to change adopted by the e3i CETL for Employability at Sheffield Hallam University and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the aims, objectives and approach to change adopted by the e3i CETL for Employability at Sheffield Hallam University and illustrates the impact of change via three thematic case studies and an organising framework for understanding the locus of change with respect to work‐related learning: module curriculum and pedagogy (micro level), Faculty and Departmental strategies and operations, course design, structure and delivery (meso level), and institutional policies and processes (the macro level). These experiences are distilled to formulate recommendations for a modus operandi for those interested or involved with transforming higher education institutions (HEIs) to create a greater emphasis on and enhanced opportunities for students to engage with work‐related learning.

Design

A case studies approach is utilised to illustrate the work of the CETL in practice and generate insights.

Findings

Findings suggest that HEIs can successfully embrace the WRL agenda and make a significant contribution to achieving its aims and objectives. Central to this success is encouraging institutions to absorb WRL into their mission in an overt manner, providing guidance, support, encouragement, inspiration, resources and reward to colleagues involved in creating and facilitating WRL, and adopting a modus operandi with regards to change that resonates with institutional academic culture.

Practical implications

The paper suggests an approach to strategic and transformative change in HEIs that will be of interest to change agents across the sector.

Originality/value

The paper adds insights to the expanding literature on managing large‐scale change initiatives in HEIs.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Barbara Workman, Pauline Armsby, Alan Durrant and Philip Frame

The purpose of this paper is to discuss three case studies reflecting areas of innovation and creativity which CETL funding made possible through a work‐based learning CETL

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss three case studies reflecting areas of innovation and creativity which CETL funding made possible through a work‐based learning CETL. CETL sponsored evaluations of funded projects and teaching initiatives informed further curriculum developments.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach the paper explores the experiences of three different projects and the impact upon staff and students in a CETL for work‐based learning. Three case studies are used, the first describing progression from a Performing Arts Diploma to a degree, facilitated by the use of learning technologies and social networking; the second considers the impact upon experienced professionals and stakeholders involved in a new Doctorate programme by Public Works. The third case study demonstrates the importance of rewarding investment in and evaluation of learning approaches, assisted by learning technology, with the resultant development of a model which facilitates reflective learning from work activities. Case studies were focused on teaching and learning practice.

Findings

These were all programme developments which arose from practitioners and impacted upon academic practice and curriculum development. They impacted upon future learning initiatives thus demonstrating that the CETL investment impacted a wide range of learning activities at different academic levels. Dissemination of impact beyond the original project was evident through qualitative feedback and practitioner practice.

Social implications

This was more of an analytical exploration of funded innovations in teaching and learning than formal research and therefore is not presented as traditional research. However, a case for case study approach in included, but data methods not explored.

Practical implications

The CETL funding of teaching and learning innovations impacted upon work‐based learning and the student learning experience within several schools across the university. These innovations have become significant for future WBL curriculum developments within the University. It is also evidenced that additional funding for five years of the CETL project enabled projects to grow and develop over a period of time. Therefore the indications are that sustained funding and evaluations at development points contribute to embedding and enhancing academic curriculum innovations.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the importance of long‐term investment in teaching and learning initiatives and the impact that such investment can have over a period of time, particularly in relation to CETL funding, of which the long‐term effects on teaching and learning in HE are as yet unknown.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Vincent Carpentier, Norbert Pachler, Karen Evans and Caroline Daly

The purpose of this paper is to explore efforts to bridge conceptualisation and practice in work‐based learning by reflecting on the legacy and sustainability of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore efforts to bridge conceptualisation and practice in work‐based learning by reflecting on the legacy and sustainability of the Centre for Excellence in Work‐based Learning for Education Professionals at the Institute of Education, University of London. The Centre was part of the national CETL (Centres for Excellence in Teaching and Learning) initiative (2005‐2010) and focussed on exploring ways of transforming current models of work‐based learning (WBL) in a bid to respond to the diversity of professional learning needs within education and beyond.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents three case studies which are representative of the Centre's approach to drive theoretical development in WBL.

Findings

The three projects featured contributed to the development of WBL through synergetic cross fertilisation while operating independently from each other. Also, they are characterised by sustainability beyond the end of the CETL initiative. The Putting Knowledge to Work project developed and operationalised the concept of recontextualisation for WBL in successfully moving knowledge from disciplines and workplaces into a curriculum; and from a curriculum into successful pedagogic strategies and learner engagement in educational institutions and workplaces. The London Mobile Learning Group developed a research dynamic around theory and practice of learning with mobile media which contributed to the development of new approaches in (work‐based) learning. The Researching Medical Learning and Practice Network created a community of practice bringing together educational researchers with medical education practitioners and researchers resulting in a greater understanding of how professional attitudes and practices develop in both undergraduate and postgraduate contexts.

Originality/value

The experience of the WLE offers an example of innovative ways to continue to develop our understanding of work‐based learning and inform practice. The impact of the WLE activities on theory, policy and practice is evident in the creation of national and international platforms strengthening existing institutional links.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Judy McKimm, Luke Millard and Sam Held

In 2007, Birmingham City University (formerly the University of Central England) and the West Midlands NHS Strategic Health Authority developed and implemented the LEAP…

Abstract

In 2007, Birmingham City University (formerly the University of Central England) and the West Midlands NHS Strategic Health Authority developed and implemented the LEAP (Leadership, Education and Partnership) project. The project extended and developed further a successful leadership development programme, which had run in the West Midlands for healthcare educators working in both higher education (HE) and NHS organisations.The LEAP project aimed to develop genuine partnership and collaborative working among health and social care education providers from a range of HE and NHS organisations in the West Midlands. This paper describes the leadership programme approaches and activities, the underpinning leadership and management theories and concepts, and the way in which these were woven together in the leadership development programme. Examples of some of the theoretical models and frameworks used in the programme, and reflections on how these helped to develop participants' knowledge, skills and approaches to collaboration and partnership working are also detailed.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Sibyl Coldham

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how activity theory was used as a method of facilitating change in the understanding of work as a driver for disciplinary and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how activity theory was used as a method of facilitating change in the understanding of work as a driver for disciplinary and professionally‐oriented learning in a UK university. The paper focuses on staff learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a case study and discussion. The central intervention used was to bring course teams to focus on the nature of work that would be relevant to their discipline, and to ask who might benefit from or commission that work, as a means to disrupt conventional thinking around curriculum design and to expand thinking around activities that could integrate real world activity with learning.

Findings

Facilitation informed by conceptualizing the curriculum in terms of Engestrom's activity system seemed to provide a catalyst for groups to develop their own models of work integrated learning with strategies that were appropriate for their disciplinary areas, and that led in each case to an opening up of roles and collaborations amongst the staff group and with external colleagues.

Originality/value

The introduction of a “client” or external agency as the commissioner or customer for the work seems to have had the effect of helping a number of academic staff to engage with the curriculum in new roles. It also enabled students to take professional responsibility, and in some cases to be positioned as colleagues in a community of practice.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Norman Jackson

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an educational design developed by the SCEPTrE CETL at the University of Surrey, aimed at encouraging, recognising and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an educational design developed by the SCEPTrE CETL at the University of Surrey, aimed at encouraging, recognising and valuing learning and personal development gained through students’ lifewide (co‐ and extra‐curricular) experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores, through a single case study, the development and piloting of a Lifewide Learning Award through which capability that is relevant to being an effective professional can be recognised.

Findings

An award framework and supporting guidance and web infrastructures was devised and successfully piloted. Although feedback from student participants and from external peers employed as independent auditors was positive and encouraging, because of significant cost‐cutting within the University, the Award Framework is not being taken forward.

Practical implications

Universities that are successful in promoting and recognising such personal learning, personal development and self‐authorship will have a competitive advantage over those that do not. The implication is that all institutions of higher education should include such frameworks in their strategies for preparing students for the complexities that lie ahead of them.

Originality/value

The core concepts of lifewide learning and lifewide curriculum and the application of these concepts through an award framework which enables a number of important learning theories to be connected and integrated. The Learning Partnership Model for “self‐authorship” developed by Baxter Magolda and others in the USA is particularly relevant. While the new educational practices are not being taken forward at Surrey the ideas can be readily adapted to other institutional contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Lori Critz, Mary Axford, William M. Baer, Chris Doty, Heidi Lowe and Crystal Renfro

This paper aims to examine the creation of a workshop series designed to help graduate students obtain the needed library research skills.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the creation of a workshop series designed to help graduate students obtain the needed library research skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Using feedback from graduate students, a library user education series of workshops was developed and later revised. Significant effort was made to apply effective marketing strategies to enhance the programs' success.

Findings

Graduate students are eager for workshops that are focused on developing the needed library research skills.

Practical implications

When developing a workshop series, feedback from the intended audience enriches the program. Furthermore, repeated fine‐tuning of content and publicity improves the final product.

Originality/value

This paper describes an innovative approach to develop and implement a graduate‐focused library instruction workshop series. The creative use of marketing strategies to incorporate ongoing user feedback and advertise the availability of sessions can significantly enhance the efficacy of a workshop series.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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