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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Alyson Brown

Based upon evaluations conducted over three years, this paper examines the implementation, effectiveness and purpose of public street CCTV systems. The usefulness of local…

141

Abstract

Based upon evaluations conducted over three years, this paper examines the implementation, effectiveness and purpose of public street CCTV systems. The usefulness of local CCTV evaluations is discussed and also the extent to which they can provide insights into the working of local community safety and crime reduction partnerships. This research suggests that at this stage during the continuing nation‐wide expansion of schemes, there is a pressing need for a re‐appraisal of practice based on the accumulating evidence. The benefits and opportunity‐cost of CCTV should be subjected to more open and realistic scrutiny than has hitherto occurred.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Candida Harris, Peter Jones, David Hillier and David Turner

During the 1990s, closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance technology has been an increasingly important and visible part of crime and nuisance prevention measures in…

3127

Abstract

During the 1990s, closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance technology has been an increasingly important and visible part of crime and nuisance prevention measures in town and city centres throughout the UK. The paper outlines the principal characteristics of CCTV systems and identifies the objectives guiding their introduction. The Home Office, police forces and many local authorities have expressed support for CCTV and they often report reductions in reported crime levels and in the fear of crime following the introduction of CCTV. At the same time, there are concerns about the cost‐effectiveness of CCTV and about a number of legal, personal privacy and civil liberties issues.

Details

Property Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Book part
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Minas Samatas

This chapter demonstrates that while in most late modern societies there is a neoliberal hegemony to expand police Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) surveillance for crime…

Abstract

This chapter demonstrates that while in most late modern societies there is a neoliberal hegemony to expand police Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) surveillance for crime control and antiterrorism, in Greece there is serious controversy and resistance against the post-Olympic use of more than 1,200 Olympic CCTV cameras. Drawing on the interesting politics of CCTV expansion and resistance, the chapter traces the reasons why, in the Greek context, this very expensive Olympic surveillance “dowry” has been opposed, even for traffic control. It critically attributes Greek citizens’ fear and mistrust primarily to their past police-state experience of authoritarian, thought-control surveillance.

Details

Surveillance and Governance: Crime Control and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1416-4

Book part
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Michael McCahill

This chapter aims to make a contribution to recent debates on the ‘governance of security’ (Johnston & Shearing, 2003) by drawing upon empirical research conducted by the…

Abstract

This chapter aims to make a contribution to recent debates on the ‘governance of security’ (Johnston & Shearing, 2003) by drawing upon empirical research conducted by the author and other writers on ‘plural policing’ and the construction of closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance networks. The chapter attempts to avoid the tendency in some of the ‘governmentality’ literature to ‘airbrush out the state’ (Hughes, 2007, p. 184), whilst at the same time showing that the aims and intentions of dominant state forces and elites are not always realised in practice. The chapter also tries to avoid any simplistic notion of a shift in policing strategies from ‘crime fighting’ to ‘risk management’. The aim instead is to show how the construction of surveillance networks is blurring the boundaries of the ‘public–private’ divide along the ‘sectoral’, ‘geographical’, ‘spatial’, ‘legal’ and ‘functional’ dimensions (Jones & Newburn, 1998), giving rise to a plural policing continuum.

Details

Surveillance and Governance: Crime Control and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1416-4

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Ray Surette

To discuss and review the shift to computer enhanced self‐monitoring CCTV surveillance systems of public spaces and the social implications of this shift.

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Abstract

Purpose

To discuss and review the shift to computer enhanced self‐monitoring CCTV surveillance systems of public spaces and the social implications of this shift.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the research and evaluation literature concerning CCTV surveillance systems culling out the history of public space CCTV systems and the concerns associated with first and second generation CCTV surveillance.

Findings

The main difference between first and second generation surveillance is the change from a “dumb camera” that needs a human eye to evaluate its images to a computer‐linked camera system that evaluates its own video images. Second generation systems reduce the human factor in surveillance and address some of the basic concerns associated with first generation surveillance systems such as data swamping, boredom, voyeurism, and profiling. Their enhanced capabilities, though, raise new concerns, particularly the expansion of surveillance and its intrusiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research is needed to assess CCTV surveillance on a set of social dynamics such as informal guardianship activities by citizens.

Practical implications

The adoption of computer‐enhanced CCTV surveillance systems should not be an automatic response to a public space security problem and their deployment should not be decided simply on the technology's availability or cost.

Originality/value

This paper provides a concise overview of the concerns associated with first generation CCTV surveillance and how the evolution of computer‐enhanced CCTV surveillance systems will alter and add to these concerns. For researchers it details research questions that need to be addressed. For practitioners and government officials considering the use of public space CCTV surveillance it provides a set of issues that should be considered prior to system adoption or deployment.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Peter Jones, David Hillier and David Turner

Within the UK the past three decades have witnessed dramatic and continuing changes in the geography of retail provision. During this period the traditional supremacy of…

Abstract

Within the UK the past three decades have witnessed dramatic and continuing changes in the geography of retail provision. During this period the traditional supremacy of town and city centres at the top of the retail hierarchy has been increasingly successfully challenged by the development and diversification of out‐of‐town and edge of town shopping facilities. This ‘out of town exodus’ (Schiller, 1987) can be traced from the food superstores opened by grocery retailers from the late 1960's onwards through the development of retail warehouses, retail parks and regional shopping centres (Guy, 1994) to a more recent ‘fourth wave’ (Fernie, 1995) which include warehouse clubs, factory outlet centres and airport retailing. The cumulative effects of these developments are seen to pose a major challenge to retail businesses in town and city centres and perhaps more fundamentally to the centres themselves. The traditional spirit of the UK's town and country planning policies, first established some fifty years ago, was to positively support retail activity in town and city centres and to restrict out of town retail development (Guy, 1994). However, from the early 1980's onwards, such policies had only a limited effect in stemming the tide of retail decentralisation and they often seemed to be honoured more in the breach than in the observance.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Parul Gupta and Madhusudhan Margam

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential and adoption of closed-circuit television (CCTV) surveillance-based security system (hereafter “CCTV”) for enhancing…

372

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential and adoption of closed-circuit television (CCTV) surveillance-based security system (hereafter “CCTV”) for enhancing the security of library materials in academic libraries of universities (central, state, deemed and private) and prestigious institutions such as Indian Institutes of Technology and Indian Institutes of Management in a developing country, i.e. India. The study also overviewed the CCTV policies of the studied libraries of universities/institutions as they relate to the ethical aspects of the surveillance system.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured questionnaire was designed and distributed among librarians of 24 academic libraries covering each zone of India in October 2019 in both physical and online manner. All 24 filled-in questionnaires were collected personally and online by the investigator were found valid eliciting a response rate of 100%. All the 24 filled-in questionnaires were included in the analysis of the interpretation of data. The response to 18 questions was analyzed in the form of tables and figures using descriptive statistical methods.

Findings

The study reveals that librarians’ found CCTV useful for security by controlling theft, unethical losses and missing items. It also helped to curb mutilation and vandalism, procurement of the rare material via the latest camera devices and night vision capturing, besides improving the service efficiency of the patron, as well as staff. The quantitative study surveyed security professionals to assess how each university/institution developed, deployed and integrated CCTV policies related to securing video data, safeguarding privacy and prevention of the potential for the unethical use of surveillance cameras. The analysis of the survey responses determined that more than 50% of the universities/institutions participating had a written CCTV policy. Further, library professionals find that the future of libraries lies in a CCTV system, so the cost should be brought down to improve return on investment by the mass adoption of this technology in a developing country such as India.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study showed that the potential uses of CCTV in Indian libraries are slow compared to that of the libraries of developed countries and some of the developing countries. Many of the CCTV policies that universities/institutions did have failed to include mandated training of personnel or provisions ensuring that their policies remained up-to-date. It is suggested that universities and institutions understudy should realize the benefits of CCTV systems and incorporate-related updated tools in the security and multi-purpose uses in the libraries to enhance the services for the users and security for the materials or collections.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for libraries and their professionals to approach CCTV systems with ethical considerations for procurement of library collections, which help to detect mutilation/theft, observe the misbehavior of users, as well as staff and deployment, should not be decided merely while balancing security demands.

Social implications

The study is significant because it represents one of the earliest works to shed light on the current level of the use of CCTV system by librarians of studied libraries of universities/institutes in developing country such as India and how they are providing CCTV-based security and services, which are currently in its primitive nature. The study also suggested that select libraries are required to weigh up and balance many competing desires, demands and objectives.

Originality/value

This paper provides a concise overview of the various applications/area and uses of CCTV system including its procedures during implementation, merits and demerits while using the system described above in libraries and recommends this technology to other libraries for faster and better services for their users and security to their library materials in today’s technological advancement. It provides a set of issues that should be considered before system adoption or deployment.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Kathryn Anne Denny

Closed circuit television (CCTV) imaging is an increasingly used technology and it is now common place for law enforcement to access CCTV footage as an investigative tool…

Abstract

Purpose

Closed circuit television (CCTV) imaging is an increasingly used technology and it is now common place for law enforcement to access CCTV footage as an investigative tool to assist in the nomination of a person of interest, or to aid in the prosecution of an offender. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of imaging practitioners in the analysis and interpretation of CCTV images within a law enforcement context. It explores and addresses the limitations of CCTV imaging in evidence with a focus on the interpretation of changes in the visual representation of clothing items.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper demonstrates the variations observed in four dark toned garments imaged using one CCTV camera with two different recording settings – visible light and near infrared. The device used was installed and operated in a manner comparable to that used in the public domain, the resulting images indicative of those experienced in casework.

Findings

The results display a noticeable change to the tonality of each clothing item between the varied recording conditions. These inconsistencies highlight the limitations of layperson analysis and identify the importance of the inclusion of imaging practitioners when interpreting and analysing such images as evidence.

Originality/value

With an abundance of images in the society, layperson interpretation has become common place. Recognising the value of trained imaging practitioners who can assist law enforcement in analysis and interpretation is paramount to ensuring CCTV images as evidence are used appropriately.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Lina Chow and Rob I. Mawby

In Hong Kong, robberies occurring in the elevators in high-rise buildings were identified as a particular problem and the purpose of this paper is to address a dedicated…

Abstract

Purpose

In Hong Kong, robberies occurring in the elevators in high-rise buildings were identified as a particular problem and the purpose of this paper is to address a dedicated programme aimed at reducing such offences.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparison of elevator-based robbery statistics over a ten-year policy-implication period, in two police districts, one with a high rate of public ownership and a traditionally high rate of elevator robberies, the second with a higher rate of private ownership and a traditionally lower rate of such robberies.

Findings

The evidence suggests that the programme was successful, with such robberies declining significantly and with no evidence of displacement.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on police statistics. There is a need for more research, for example, investigating residents’ involvement with the system and the extent to which it encouraged shared ownership of the initiative.

Practical implications

What is clear is that, where in the West the Newman legacy led to the demonisation of high-rise public sector housing, in Hong Kong, where there is no viable alternative, the use of CCTV helped transform such areas into safer communities.

Social implications

The rate of robbery, most notably elevator-based robbery, fell dramatically, improving community safety.

Originality/value

Though there has been a considerable amount of research on the impact of CCTV on crime, almost all of this has focussed on Western industrial societies and little of it has addressed robbery. To the best of authors’ knowledge, this research is the first in Hong Kong, and the first to evaluate the impact of CCTV on robbery.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2004

Philip Brey

This essay examines ethical aspects of the use of facial recognition technology for surveillance purposes in public and semipublic areas, focusing particularly on the…

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Abstract

This essay examines ethical aspects of the use of facial recognition technology for surveillance purposes in public and semipublic areas, focusing particularly on the balance between security and privacy and civil liberties. As a case study, the FaceIt facial recognition engine of Identix Corporation will be analyzed, as well as its use in “Smart” video surveillance (CCTV) systems in city centers and airports. The ethical analysis will be based on a careful analysis of current facial recognition technology, of its use in Smart CCTV systems, and of the arguments used by proponents and opponents of such systems. It will be argued that Smart CCTV, which integrates video surveillance technology and biometric technology, faces ethical problems of error, function creep and privacy. In a concluding section on policy, it will be discussed whether such problems outweigh the security value of Smart CCTV in public places.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000