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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Angela Yung Chi Hou, Christopher Hill, Karen Hui-Jung Chen, Sandy Tsai and Vivian Chen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the student mobility programs of the three initiatives – in Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional…

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3355

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the student mobility programs of the three initiatives – in Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional Institution of Higher Education and Development, University Mobility in Asia and Pacific (UMAP), and Campus Asia – and provide a comparative analysis of the respective programs in terms of the role of government, institutional involvement, quality assurance, and challenges. In addition, the paper will assess their impacts on higher education regionalization by regulatory models toward the end of the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts qualitative document analysis as a major research method to explore the developmental models of three student mobility programs. Document analysis is an approach used to gather and review the content of existing written documentation related to the study in order to extract pieces of information in a rigorous and systematic manner.

Findings

ASEAN International Mobility for Students (AIMS), Collective Action for Mobility Program of University Student in Asia (CAMPUS Asia), and UMAP student mobility schemes have a shared purpose in higher education regionalization, but with different regulatory frameworks and Functional, Organizational, and Political approach models. AIMS and CAMPUS Asia as a strong network and government-led initiatives adopt a combination of functional, organizational, and political approaches; UMAP provides university-driven regional mobility programs with a hybridized force. However, all three of them face the same challenges at regional and national levels, such as different national regulation, coordination among participants, and implementation of credit transfer schemes.

Practical implications

The scale of three student mobility programs is still low, which results in limited impact on higher education regionalization in Asia. However, a stronger decision-making model and increased financial support to universities and students are desirable for the creation of a sustainable and effective network.

Originality/value

This is an original research and makes a great contribution to Asian nations.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Ka Ho Mok

The principal goal of the article is to examine how Singapore, one of the East Asian tiger economies, has attempted to diversify its higher education system by developing…

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4561

Abstract

Purpose

The principal goal of the article is to examine how Singapore, one of the East Asian tiger economies, has attempted to diversify its higher education system by developing “transnational education” in the island state.

Design/methodology/approach

With particular reference to the most recent education reforms and changing higher education governance in Singapore, this article focuses on how the Singapore government has changed its higher education governance models in enhancing the global competitiveness of its higher education system by adopting more pro‐competition policy instruments and allowing the growth of transnational education in the city state.

Findings

The findings suggest the choice of policy tools (the choice of market forces in higher education and the rise of transnational education in the present case) is highly political and governments should pay particular attention to the particular socio‐economic and socio‐political contexts of their countries when making such choices.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the role of government in East Asia is still important, especially when there is a strong need for government to set up appropriate regulations, social protection and welfare, hence, governments in East Asia are very much conceived as a complement to the markets.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Pak Tee Ng and Charlene Tan

This paper seeks to analyse the Singapore government's recent attempt to make Singapore a “Global Schoolhouse” by transforming its tertiary education sector. It aims to…

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2492

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to analyse the Singapore government's recent attempt to make Singapore a “Global Schoolhouse” by transforming its tertiary education sector. It aims to examine the government's attempt to promote greater diversity and autonomy in the tertiary education landscape; it also aims to examine the government's systems of state funding and accountability for the tertiary education sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises a policy analysis approach to examine the development of the “Global Schoolhouse” in Singapore. In particular, it examines a case study of the setting up and subsequent sudden pull‐out of the University of New South Wales Asia (UNSW Asia) to highlight the increasing challenge faced by the government in this undertaking.

Findings

Despite the government's promotion of greater diversity and autonomy in the tertiary education landscape, the government maintains centralised control through systems of accountability to, and funding from, the state. The case study of UNSW Asia shows that it is a paradoxical challenge for the government to engineer a tertiary education “market economy” with private foreign players while maintaining centralised control over the achievement of its strategic agenda within its stipulated time frame.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis of the Singapore “Global Schoolhouse” effort is limited to a general review of the higher education scene in Singapore and a case study.

Practical implications

The study of Singapore serves as a mirror to other developing countries in understanding the challenges in developing a “Global Schoolhouse” while trying to maintain centralised control.

Originality/value

This paper provides an analysis of the recent developments in the Singapore “Global Schoolhouse” effort.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Roger Yap Chao

This paper explores the issue of developing and enhancing intra-ASEAN international student mobility given the context of ASEAN integration, regionalization of ASEAN…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the issue of developing and enhancing intra-ASEAN international student mobility given the context of ASEAN integration, regionalization of ASEAN higher education and the various intra‐ASEAN student mobility schemes currently implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

It explores higher education policies, available higher education and international student mobility data, as well as the various intra‐ASEAN (and relevant) student mobility schemes to present the current status of intra‐ASEAN student mobility, challenges and opportunities to further enhance student mobility within the ASEAN region.

Findings

Aside from showing that intra‐ASEAN student mobility is significantly low compared to outbound student mobility from ASEAN countries, the paper also highlights the relationship between a country’s income status with choice of intra‐ASEAN or extraASEAN student mobility. Finally, it recommends developing a comprehensive intra‐ASEAN mobility scheme taking the merits of the various intra‐ASEAN mobility schemes currently implemented and guided by developments in the European ERASMUS mobility programs.

Originality/value

This is probably the first (in fact, it is an exploratory) paper that address the issue of intra‐ASEAN international student mobility, which aims to explore relevant issues to address the development of a comprehensive ASEAN mobility scheme.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Miki Sugimura

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the function and issues of intra‐ and inter‐regional cooperation of international higher education in Asia and consider the…

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596

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the function and issues of intra‐ and inter‐regional cooperation of international higher education in Asia and consider the possibility of East Asian integration as regionalization.

Design/methodology/approach

The research consists of two steps. First, by comparing with examples of regional networks and universities’ cooperation programs, it breaks down the current situation of regional cooperation. Second, it analyses the structure of those networks and programs.

Findings

Both regional education networks and universities’ cooperation programs develop in multi‐layers and in different phases, and they have a function of distribution of Asian higher education as public goods for regionalization. There are still issues such as immigration control relating to the people's and programs’ mobility, program language, financial and personnel affairs, as well as adjustments to be made in accreditation assessment, credit compatibility and quality assurance including curriculum setting. Retaining the autonomy of countries and higher education agencies in international cooperation is also the major issue in promoting these programs. However, such international cooperation produces the new forms of international higher education for human resource development.

Research limitations/implications

Not all networks and programs can be examined, but the trend and characteristics of the cooperation in higher education can be highlighted.

Practical implications

The findings give significance to the “Campus Asia” concept which is now in preparation for realization by the agreement at the summit of China, Japan and South Korea in October 2009.

Originality/value

While integration and regionalization in East Asia has been discussed previously from the political and economic aspects, this paper responds to the subject from the socio‐cultural aspect by focusing on international higher education in Asia.

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Akiyoshi Yonezawa and Arthur Meerman

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the recent evolution of the policy debate over the internationalization of Japanese higher education in times of particularly…

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507

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the recent evolution of the policy debate over the internationalization of Japanese higher education in times of particularly strong financial constraint, with reference also made to trends in the higher education systems of neighboring Asian countries. The authors describe the de facto formation of a regional Asia‐Pacific higher education arena through open multilateral initiatives, which continues to develop despite the lack of a developed regional policy consensus.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper is based upon over a decade of investigation into the Japanese and other Asian higher education systems. Observations drawn are based on the critical analysis of regional dynamics, including changing sociopolitical, demographic, economic and technology/information‐based factors. The paper objectively interprets information gathered on Japan's investment in human resources, the research performance and international standing of its universities, as well as on and cross‐border phenomena within the Asia‐Pacific region, such as transnational academic mobility, exchange agreements and other multilateral initiatives.

Findings

The international dimension of Asia‐Pacific higher education is becoming increasingly pronounced, primarily as a result of regional multilateral initiatives. Mutual exchange and collaboration between higher education institutions and individual academics and students are widespread and developing rapidly. However, at this moment, there is neither a developed policy consensus to guide the process, nor explicit agreement as to what the “regional higher education arena” in East Asia and the Asia Pacific looks like. Increasingly complex regional dynamics now present Japanese higher education with the need to reposition its role as a distinguished global leader to one as an active member in supporting multilateral initiatives within the Asia‐Pacific region.

Originality/value

In providing an objective synopsis of selected policy initiatives in Japanese and Asian higher education, this paper underscores the need to re‐conceptualize higher education dynamics in the Asian region and Japan's role therein. Long‐held views of Japan as “regional leader”, of the significance of the geographic situation of any one nation, of cross‐border initiatives as planned phenomena and of the factors influencing regional collaboration in academia are reassessed. As such, this paper moves beyond traditional “polar” conceptualizations to the new reality of “multilateral” relationships, concluding with an urgent call for consensus on key policy issues.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2021

Bifeng Zhu, Gebing Liu and Jing Feng

This paper aims to make a comparative study on the latest version of green campus evaluation standard between China and America: Green Campus Evaluation Standard…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to make a comparative study on the latest version of green campus evaluation standard between China and America: Green Campus Evaluation Standard (GB/T51356-2019) and the sustainability tracking, assessment and rating system (STARS 2.2). The differences of evaluation methods and contents are analyzed and their respective characteristics and advantages are sorted out, so as to promote the development of sustainable campus evaluation standards.

Design/methodology/approach

The research mainly adopts the method of comparative study, which is carried out from three dimensions, namely, the related policies development of campus construction and world university sustainable rankings; the content of evaluation standards (including evaluation methods and evaluation categories and scores); the characteristics and current application of standards.

Findings

There are great differences between the evaluation standards of China and America in organization and participation mode, evaluation method and content. Public engagement, energy and campus engagement are the hot spots. Buildings, energy, food and dining and investment and finance will become the focus of sustainable campus in the future. Specific optimization strategies of key points, evaluation method and content and organization and participation mode of Chinese standard are put forward.

Practical implications

This paper clarifies the advantages and disadvantages of the current global sustainable campus, and provides the basis for the next stage of construction policy. At the same time, it is helpful for all countries, especially China, to formulate construction guidelines that not only meet their own actual needs but also conform to the trend of global sustainable campus development.

Social implications

The connotation of sustainable campus is enriched, and the evaluation standards of sustainable campus are improved. The development of sustainable campus is promoted, so as to realize the sustainable development goals.

Originality/value

This research expands the scope of the study to the whole campus, rather than just one aspect of campus buildings. It compares the evaluation standard of green campus in China with STARS in the USA, and no longer compares leadership in energy and environmental design for schools. It discusses the campus building’s energy conservation while paying attention to the campus green consciousness, green management and green planning. Based on the relevant data currently used by STARS in the global evaluation, this paper analyzes the hot spots and shortcomings of the current global sustainable campus construction and puts forward some optimization suggestions for China’s green campus evaluation system.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Jae-Eun Jon and Sung-Sang Yoo

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the policy trends for the internationalization of higher education in Korea, and suggest a future direction toward the pursuit of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the policy trends for the internationalization of higher education in Korea, and suggest a future direction toward the pursuit of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study of Korea focusing on its internationalization in higher education. In order to analyze the government policy trends and institutional strategies for internationalization, the relevant literature and documents were analyzed.

Findings

The government policy for the internationalization of higher education in Korea has consisted of three stages: first, controlled outbound mobility; second, a major shift and focus on inbound mobility, recently along with intraregional cooperation for both directions of mobility in Asia and third, the beginning of efforts toward the pursuit of the SDGs, which needs to be expanded and systematized further.

Originality/value

This paper shows presents the comprehensive review of internationalization policies in Korean higher education, including the recent programs and changes at both the governmental and institutional levels. There has been a notable lack of discussion on the SDGs in relation to the internationalization of Korean higher education, which is addressed in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Vanessa Quintal and Ian Phau

The purpose of this paper is to explore student perceptions of the internationalised learning environment across a particular university's home and offshore campuses. It…

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1575

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore student perceptions of the internationalised learning environment across a particular university's home and offshore campuses. It addresses three research questions namely: what constitutes the internationalised learning environment for students? Can a university offer an internationalised learning environment that is equitable for students across its home and offshore campuses? And what differences exist in the internationalised learning environment for students in a university's home and offshore campuses?

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 484 completed responses were collected from the university's six campuses in Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia.

Findings

Findings suggested significant differences in the way students perceived of teaching reputation, context-specific curriculum, resources, student-support staff interaction and their attitude towards their university.

Practical implications

These insights could help a university's teaching staff and administrators to focus on specific attributes in marketing the internationalised learning environments of each of its campuses. This could give the university better opportunity for improving the learning process and its outcomes for students.

Originality/value

This paper sets out to define the parameters of the internationalised learning environment and conducts an audit of this environment from the student perspective. Findings suggested significant differences in the way students perceived of teaching reputation, context-specific curriculum, resources, student-support staff interaction and their attitude towards their university. In the market of fierce competition for international students, it is crucial that these positive attributes be part of the marketing messages in any promotion campaigns for universities.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Eelis Rytkönen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of spatial transformation in the Network Society on facilities management principles in the context of an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of spatial transformation in the Network Society on facilities management principles in the context of an interdisciplinary university campus.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reports a holistic case study with eight embedded units in one interdisciplinary university campus in Finland through a business model approach.

Findings

The findings propose that spatial development projects should be examined holistically on three facilitation layers, namely, social, physical and virtual, through five business model lenses of Offering, Customers, Revenue Streams, Resources, and Cost Structure. Based on the findings, four main business model types can be identified and distinguished mainly in terms of collaborating with different partners and supporting a different core task of the university.

Research limitations/implications

The cases are highly context-dependent, and their business models are ever evolving, which is why the dynamics of the development processes should be studied in more detail. The types of business models differ fundamentally, which is why their evaluation criteria could be tailored accordingly.

Practical implications

The results suggest that the spatial transformation requires multiple supporting processes and principles, expanding the roles of the campus managers: finding a balance between localization and globalization, and individualism and communalism; collaborating with internal and external parties; identifying potential grass root spatial development projects to be supported; and engaging users in their expertise. The strengthening impact of social facilitation is capable of opening new business opportunities.

Originality/value

This study indicates that the spatial transformation is happening in practice and offers guidelines for dynamically reacting to it from the facilities management perspective.

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