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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Semir Ibrahimovic and Ulrik Franke

This paper aims to examine the connection between information system (IS) availability and operational risk losses and the capital requirements. As most businesses today…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the connection between information system (IS) availability and operational risk losses and the capital requirements. As most businesses today become increasingly dependent on information technology (IT) services for continuous operations, IS availability is becoming more important for most industries. However, the banking sector has particular sector-specific concerns that go beyond the direct and indirect losses resulting from unavailability. According to the first pillar of the Basel II accord, IT outages in the banking sector lead to increased capital requirements and thus create an additional regulatory cost, over and above the direct and indirect costs of an outage.

Design/methodology/approach

A Bayesian belief network (BBN) with nodes representing causal factors has been used for identification of the factors with the greatest influence on IS availability, thus helping in investment decisions.

Findings

Using the BBN model for making IS availability-related decisions action (e.g. bringing a causal factor up to the best practice level), organization, according to the presented mapping table, would have less operational risk events related to IS availability. This would have direct impact by decreasing losses, related to those events, as well as to decrease the capital requirements, prescribed by the Basel II accord, for covering operational risk losses.

Practical implications

An institution using the proposed framework can use the mapping table to see which measures for improving IS availability will have a direct impact on operational risk events, thus improving operational risk management.

Originality/value

The authors mapped the factors causing unavailability of IS system to the rudimentary IT risk management framework implied by the Basel II regulations and, thus, established an otherwise absent link from the IT availability management to operational risk management according to the Basel II framework.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Abstract

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 62 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Ian Ellingham

The first authorized property unit trusts in the UK were created inSeptember 1991, and have operated unspectacularly since then, as thecurrent property climate has not, in…

Abstract

The first authorized property unit trusts in the UK were created in September 1991, and have operated unspectacularly since then, as the current property climate has not, in general, been encouraging. Similar Canadian investment vehicles first appeared in the early 1980s, and experienced significant growth through the property boom of the mid‐1980s. Since then, with decreasing property values many of these funds have been forced to reorganize. Yet, the structure of the Canadian funds would have complied with the most significant aspects of the UK regulations. The consideration of the nature of the manifold difficulties of the Canadian funds suggests that the regulations established in the UK may not prevent similar problems. Accordingly, the specifics of the Canadian funds and the manner in which their structure added further levels of risk to that inherent in their underlying assets should be considered relative to the possible future performance of similar vehicles in the UK.

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Journal of Property Finance, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0958-868X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2015

James Vines

The purpose of this chapter is to examine selected state laws regarding cyberbullying. The advances in technology have allowed bullying to take an online form, where…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to examine selected state laws regarding cyberbullying. The advances in technology have allowed bullying to take an online form, where bullies can remain anonymous and access their targets 24 hours a day. The online bullying has left school leaders in a legal dilemma as to how and when to address an incident that occurs off school grounds. The laws which guide school leaders are found at the state level. The major inconsistencies between state laws are illustrated in this chapter. The findings in recent research reveal that some state bullying laws define specific terms such as electronic communication, and intimidation, and harassment. Some state laws provide a detailed protocol for how teachers and administrators should report and handle online bullying that has an impact on the school environment. However, some states leave developing a protocol up to individual school districts. The varying school cyberbullying laws and policies mean that leaders across the United States do not have a unified way to handle issues originating off-campus. However, school leaders should have a comprehensive policy which helps to address cyberbullying issues. This chapter includes a critical examination of current laws in the states and a review of proposed federal statutes presently stalled in the U.S. Congress.

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Legal Frontiers in Education: Complex Law Issues for Leaders, Policymakers and Policy Implementers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-577-2

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2017

Riccardo Bellofiore and Scott Carter

Resurgent interest in the life and work of the Italian Cambridge economist Piero Sraffa is leading to New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship. This chapter introduces readers…

Abstract

Resurgent interest in the life and work of the Italian Cambridge economist Piero Sraffa is leading to New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship. This chapter introduces readers to some of these developments. First and perhaps foremost is the fact that as of September 2016 Sraffa’s archival material has been uploaded onto the website of the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge University, as digital colour images; this chapter introduces readers to the history of these events. This history provides sharp relief on the extant debates over the role of the archival material in leading to the final publication of Production of Commodities by Means of Commodities, and readers are provided a brief sketch of these matters. The varied nature of Sraffa scholarship is demonstrated by the different aspects of Sraffa’s intellectual legacy which are developed and discussed in the various entries of our Symposium. The conclusion is reached that we are on the cusp of an exciting phase change of tremendous potential in Sraffa scholarship.

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Including a Symposium on New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-539-9

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Sofia Kjellström, Gunilla Avby, Kristina Areskoug-Josefsson, Boel Andersson Gäre and Monica Andersson Bäck

The purpose of this paper is to explore work motivation among professionals at well-functioning primary healthcare centers subject to a national healthcare reform which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore work motivation among professionals at well-functioning primary healthcare centers subject to a national healthcare reform which include financial incentives.

Design/methodology/approach

Five primary healthcare centers in Sweden were purposively selected for being well-operated and representing public/private and small/large units. In total, 43 interviews were completed with different medical professions and qualitative deductive content analysis was conducted.

Findings

Work motivation exists for professionals when their individual goals are aligned with the organizational goals and the design of the reform. The centers’ positive management was due to a unique combination of factors, such as clear direction of goals, a culture of non-hierarchical collaboration, and systematic quality improvement work. The financial incentives need to be translated in terms of quality patient care to provide clear direction for the professionals. Social processes where professionals work together as cohesive groups, and provided space for quality improvement work is pivotal in addressing how alignment is created.

Practical implications

Leaders need to consistently translate and integrate reforms with the professionals’ drives and values. This is done by encouraging participation through teamwork, time for structured reflection, and quality improvement work.

Social implications

The design of the reforms and leadership are essential preconditions for work motivation.

Originality/value

The study offers a more complete picture of how reforms are managed at primary healthcare centers, as different medical professionals are included. The value also consists of showing how a range of aspects combine for primary healthcare professionals to successfully manage external reforms.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Antoinette Pole and Archana Kumar

– The purpose of this paper is to seek to segment CSA members based on their motivations to join a CSA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to segment CSA members based on their motivations to join a CSA.

Design/methodology/approach

Data obtained from an online survey of 565 members belonging to a New York state CSA were analyzed using a combined hierarchical and non-hierarchical cluster analysis.

Findings

Based on their motivations to join a CSA results reveal four distinct types of segments among CSA members: No-Frills Member, Foodie Member, Nonchalant Member, and Quintessential Member. Results show all four clusters differ statistically across demographic characteristics including gender, political affiliation, and household income. The clusters differed across psychographic characteristics such as attitudes toward the treatment of animals, treatment of farm workers, pesticide use, the environment, food miles, and limiting factory farm purchases. Quintessential Members emerge as most concerned with food purchasing decisions while No-Frills Members are least concerned.

Research limitations/implications

The study employs a non-random purposive sample of CSAs in New York state. Respondents were recruited indirectly to participate in an online survey. The length and complexity of the survey, absence of an email address for respondents, levels of digital fluency, and technical glitches may result in lower participation rates.

Practical implications

This paper offers recommendations to farmers for retaining and attracting different types of CSA members.

Originality/value

This is the first study that segments CSA members in the USA based on their motivations to subscribe to a CSA, and it differentiates CSA member clusters based on their demographics, psychographics, and food purchasing decisions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Gabriel Antonio Mendible, Jack A. Rulander and Stephen P. Johnston

This study aims to evaluate the performance of injection molding inserts produced via rapid and conventional manufacturing techniques considering the mechanical and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the performance of injection molding inserts produced via rapid and conventional manufacturing techniques considering the mechanical and thermal performance of the tools as well as the resulting molded part quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Three insert materials and manufacturing techniques were evaluated, jetted photopolymer (PolyJet) 3D printing using digital ABS, direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) using bronze and machining using stainless steel. Molding trials were performed, and the insert surface temperature, longevity and part properties were evaluated. Complementary information was acquired using computer simulation.

Findings

Similar behavior and part quality were observed in machined and DMLS inserts. The latter were used for 500 cycles without any signs of failure. PolyJet inserts had increased cycle time and slower rate of cooling which increased shrinkage and crystallinity in the molded parts. PolyJet inserts could be produced quickly at a lower cost than machined or DMLS inserts.

Research limitations/implications

Cooling within the insert was not studied; inserts were cooled indirectly by the mold plates behind them. Subsequent studies will incorporate cooling lines directly into the inserts.

Originality/value

Little research has been done to understand the thermal behavior of inserts manufactured via rapid tooling techniques. This study provides a direct comparison between rapid tooling techniques, which is supported by simulation results and analysis of the actual molding properties.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Shan Cao, Faqing He and Jinwei Gao

Important reserves of oil and gas, which are left to be discovered and produced, are mainly concentrated in challenging locations and under severe conditions such as high…

Abstract

Purpose

Important reserves of oil and gas, which are left to be discovered and produced, are mainly concentrated in challenging locations and under severe conditions such as high pressure (HP)/high temperature (HT). The presence of aggressive environments including H2S, CO2 and chlorides plus HP/HT causes a series of corrosion problems, which cost the oil industry billions of dollars a year. Thus, there is an increasing challenge for tubes (i.e. oil country tubular goods, for short, OCTG) used in producing oil and gas. The purpose of this study is to summarize different kinds of corrosion problems and their mitigation, to more efficiently protect OCTG from corrosion.

Design/methodology/approach

To effectively select proper mitigation methods, the mechanism of corrosion must be understood, which can be classified into four categories: sweet corrosion, sour corrosion, galvanic corrosion and microbiologically induced corrosion. Also, the effects of environmental and material factors on the corrosion rate are presented. Subsequently, current technology of mitigating these corrosion problems has been discussed, including the development of materials, application of chemical inhibitors and application of protective layers.

Findings

It is stressed that limits exist for each individual mitigation method; therefore, a careful balance between economic life of OCTG and safety in operation is required.

Originality/value

The main purpose of this essay is to give a brief review and detailed introduction and analysis about those technologies.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 64 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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