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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

C.J. Strugnell

Briefly describes the effect recent food safety scares have had onthe UK food‐processing industry and outlines recent food legislationbrought in both to increase consumer…

Abstract

Briefly describes the effect recent food safety scares have had on the UK food‐processing industry and outlines recent food legislation brought in both to increase consumer confidence and to strengthen existing regulations. Also addresses the matters of BS 5750, HACCP and Total Quality Management, as they relate to the food industry, and concludes with the benefits which such an approach can have both for the industry in general and the consumer in particular.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 92 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Christopher Strugnell

Outlines some of the reasons behind the development of vegetableoil cheese and critically questions the whole basis and need for suchcheese‐type or substitute products…

Abstract

Outlines some of the reasons behind the development of vegetable oil cheese and critically questions the whole basis and need for such cheese‐type or substitute products. Evaluates two of these new products and compares them with mild and low‐fat Cheddar cheese by using a semi‐trained sensory panel. Finds no significant differences between the appearance of the cheeses but finds differences for texture and flavour. Finds the vegetable oil cheeses to have a flavour similar to mild Cheddar, while the product made with sunflower oil has a soft and crumbly texture compared with that of cheese made from rapeseed oil.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Christopher Strugnell and Gail McGuigan

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Zandra Reed and Christopher Strugnell

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Christopher Strugnell

Fermented dairy products are increasing in consumer acceptance;discusses two such examples – yogurt and fromage frais – indetail. Also refers to the creative side to…

Abstract

Fermented dairy products are increasing in consumer acceptance; discusses two such examples – yogurt and fromage frais – in detail. Also refers to the creative side to product development and how fermented products in general have been managed creatively. Also mentions the different starter cultures used in yogurt fermentations and the potential health benefits, if any. Uses cone penetrometry to assess the different textural properties of fermented dairy products such as yogurt and fromage frais.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 95 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

James Kelly, Jason J. Turner and Kirsty McKenna

Aims to investigate parental perspectives of the influence of the media, peers and parents on a child's perceptions of healthy food products.

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to investigate parental perspectives of the influence of the media, peers and parents on a child's perceptions of healthy food products.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative analysis was conducted, using the results from 143 questionnaires, collected through a randomly selected primary school in Dundee.

Findings

A positive significant relationship was found (p=0.006) between parents being aware of the health impact of fatty foods and purchasing healthy food products both for themselves and for their children. With regard to the influence of the media the research found a positive significant relationship (p=0.004), between the influence of adverts on children and the pestering and giving in of parents in the supermarket. The aspects of the influence of peers found that 44 per cent of parents believed that peer pressure influenced a child's demands for healthy food with 60 per cent of parents stating the influence of peers on a child's demands for junk food. No significant relationship was found, however, on peer influence and parental yielding. In the final aspect, that of parental influence, no significant relationship was found between pester power and parental yielding.

Research limitations/implications

This was an exploratory study and carries the limitation of generalisability as it was conducted solely in one primary school in Dundee. Any further research should contrast perspectives from other UK cities and develop research into the family dynamics and education.

Practical implications

It is suggested that the media have a significant influence on a child's demands for junk food, which emphasises the importance of using the media to encourage children to eat more healthily. Further the paper provides insight into influencing factors, suggesting that advertising can play a prominent role in influencing children's eating habits.

Originality/value

This paper is helpful to both academics and practitioners in the field of marketing and food marketing. The paper provides some insight into parental perspectives of the influence of the media, peers and parents themselves on a child's healthy eating habits.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Lesley Douglas

Given free choice in a school cafeteria 12‐year‐olds were found to prefer foods which were high in fat and sugar. Their knowledge regarding differences between healthy and…

Abstract

Given free choice in a school cafeteria 12‐year‐olds were found to prefer foods which were high in fat and sugar. Their knowledge regarding differences between healthy and less healthy foods was better than their knowledge of specific nutrient‐rich foods. However, while this knowledge is a prerequisite to understanding the role of diet to health, knowledge alone has been insufficient to bring about healthier dietary choice. In the long term if positive dietary change is to be achieved, the role of factors such as social and economic background in modifying food choice must be considered.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 22 January 2018

Gerald Oeser, Tanju Aygün, Claudia-Livia Balan, Thomas Corsten, Christian Dechêne, Rolf Ibald, Rainer Paffrath and Marcus Thomas Schuckel

The purpose of this paper is to gain a general holistic view of implications of the growing and highly relevant customer segment of elder consumers for the food demand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a general holistic view of implications of the growing and highly relevant customer segment of elder consumers for the food demand chain (food retail, production, logistics, and business informatics) in Germany.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a holistic demand-chain approach that is based on interviews with 36 German food consumers aged 65-87 and with 50 experts from manufacturing, trade, logistics, and business informatics as well as a survey with 1,288 consumers above 64 years of age and 682 consumers below 65 years of age.

Findings

Physical, statistical, psychological, social, and behavioural characteristics of elder German consumers may influence location, services, and layout of food retail, food variety, sizes, packaging, and labelling, food production, transportation, and storage volumes and capacities, as well as facility location, route, and inventory planning. The social function of grocery shopping especially for single consumers, intergenerational products and services, home-delivery services especially to rural areas, as well as decentralisation and regionalisation are expected to gain importance. Logistics and industry 4.0 can facilitate the efficient and effective supply of food.

Originality/value

This research is the first to investigate the needs and wants of elder German food consumers and their implications for the German food demand chain in a more holistic demand-chain approach.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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