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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Timothy G. Hawkins, Michael J. Gravier and C. Michael Wittmann

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a sourcing professional arrives at a decision to use an electronic reverse auction (eRA) to source a particular requirement by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a sourcing professional arrives at a decision to use an electronic reverse auction (eRA) to source a particular requirement by examining eRA appropriateness.

Design/methodology/approach

Past eRA research findings are synthesized into a summary table. From a comprehensive review of the literature, theories of technology adoption, social influence, referent‐dependence theory, and planned behaviour are discussed and synthesized into a model that explains the antecedents of eRA appropriateness. A case study methodology using structured interviews resulted in a refined model that sheds light on some of the controversial findings regarding electronic reverse auction appropriateness.

Findings

Expected savings, buyer confidence, and prior eRA sourcing satisfaction are identified as new constructs that help explain the decision to source via eRAs. Additionally, perceived eRA appropriateness is proposed as a new construct that mediates the influence of external, strategy factors on the decision to source via eRAs.

Research limitations/implications

Recent literature suggests that the benefits of reverse auctions are overstated and reverse auctions constitute a fundamentally coercive use of buyer power. Reconciling the conflicting supplier perceptions of reverse auctions as use of coercive power with buyer perceptions of cost savings requires an explanation for the factors that lead to the decision to source via eRAs.

Practical implications

The modern competitive supply chain environment entices businesses to explore all avenues for cost savings. Explaining the drivers of reverse auction use illuminates the advantages and pitfalls of reverse auctions as a strategic sourcing venue.

Originality/value

From an extensive review of the eRA literature and eight case studies, the authors propose a model that integrates and extends previous eRA research. Key insights from the model are the mediating effect of perceived eRA appropriateness and the integration of individual level variables with the strategic decision to source via eRA. Additionally, a table is provided summarizing the findings from relevant eRA research that reveals key insights into the phenomenon.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2014

C. Michael Wittmann, David R Nowicki, Terry L Pohlen and Wesley S Randall

Research suggests that service-dominant logic (SDL) is well suited to support supply chain management (SCM) research and practice. Qualitative research has shown that SDL…

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests that service-dominant logic (SDL) is well suited to support supply chain management (SCM) research and practice. Qualitative research has shown that SDL is particularly consistent with an outcome-based supply chain strategy known as performance-based logistics (PBL). The purpose of this paper is to extend theory and practice by exploring the degree to which SDL is utilized in practice. Specifically, PBL is examined for consistency with the underlying fundamental premises (FPs) of SDL. In doing so, this paper answers the positive question, “what exists”, at the intersection of SDL and SCM.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a mixed methodological approach. First, the FPs of SDL are operationalized using the language of PBL. The PBL FPs are tested quantitatively through an online survey of 52 supply chain PBL experts. A qualitative analysis is conducted using comments associated with each premise.

Findings

The survey results suggest that PBL is consistent with SDL. These results indicate that PBL is a supply chain context of SDL.

Originality/value

This is one of the first works to examine the degree to which SDL concepts are being utilized in practice.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

M. Theodore Farris, C. Michael Wittmann and Ron Hasty

To examine supply chain competences necessary to efficiently and/or effectively succeed in aftermarket support.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine supply chain competences necessary to efficiently and/or effectively succeed in aftermarket support.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the aerospace industry as a context, this paper provides a brief overview of aftermarket support practices and trends and discusses the broader implications for aftermarket supply chain managers.

Findings

There are multiple approaches to aftermarket support. Which approach should be used depends on key variables including: technology, need for visibility and/or traceability, and need for collaborative product commerce.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a general review. Future research should examine resources necessary in individual industries, other forms of relationships, and the influence of new technologies.

Practical implications

In many industries, there are significant opportunities for incremental profit in aftermarket support. Collaborative product commerce, alliances, a number of new technologies (e.g. web commerce), and security needs may play critical roles in determining whether or not a company's aftermarket support practices will be profitable. Firms without competences in these areas should seek help from trusted partners to fill competence gaps.

Originality/value

This paper explores an often ignored but significant line of business – aftermarket support. Lessons demonstrated in this paper may be used in a number of industries that rely on aftermarket support for incremental profit.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Ellen Pullins, Monideepa Tarafdar and Phuoc Pham

This article evaluates the effect of technostress due to implementation of sales technologies on sales professionals in terms of changes in job satisfaction and role…

Abstract

Purpose

This article evaluates the effect of technostress due to implementation of sales technologies on sales professionals in terms of changes in job satisfaction and role stress and potential mitigation strategies including technostress inhibitors and job commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilizes a survey data collection from sales professionals in B2B consultative roles selling to business customers from construction, industrial supply and business service firms, including items that explore before and after factors around a customer relationship management implementation.

Findings

Technostress results in a decrease in job satisfaction and an increase in role stress of sales professionals. Job commitment moderates the decrease in job satisfaction, i.e. the higher the job commitment the less significant the decrease in job satisfaction.

Practical implications

Sales forces need to implement technostress inhibitors to help mitigate the effects of technostress in exacerbating other sales professional stressors. These inhibitors should be contextualized to the unique situation of the sales organization.

Originality/value

The study examines the dark side of sales technologies. Our research expands current understanding by considering new relations among technostress-creating conditions and two work-related outcomes that are salient to sales professionals, namely role stress and job satisfaction. Further, we investigate the change in these outcomes before and after the implementation of sales technologies rather than only considering them at one point of time, after the fact.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Elizabeth Tricomi and Samantha DePasque

Performance feedback about whether responses are correct or incorrect provides valuable information to help guide learning. Although feedback itself has no extrinsic…

Abstract

Performance feedback about whether responses are correct or incorrect provides valuable information to help guide learning. Although feedback itself has no extrinsic value, it can produce subjective feelings similar to “rewards” and “punishments.” Therefore, feedback can play both an informative and a motivational role. Over the past decade, researchers have identified a neural circuit that processes reward value and promotes reinforcement learning, involving target regions of dopaminergic input (e.g., striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex). Importantly, this circuit is engaged by performance feedback even in the absence of reward. Recent research suggests that feedback-related brain activity can be modulated by motivational context, such as whether feedback reflects goal achievement, whether learners are oriented toward the informative versus evaluative aspect of feedback, and whether individual learners are motivated to perform well relative to their peers. This body of research suggests that the brain responds flexibly to feedback, based on the learner’s goals.

Details

Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-474-7

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Chi Nguyen Thi Khanh, Le Thai Phong and Kien Dinh Cao

This paper aims to analyze the effects of organizational factors on electronic customer relationship management (e-CRM) successful implementation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the effects of organizational factors on electronic customer relationship management (e-CRM) successful implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a structured questionnaire survey conducted in Vietnam. The dataset consists of 241 valid responses by individuals working at Vietnamese airlines. Correlation analysis and structural equation modeling were used to examine the causal relationships among organizational factors, customer orientation, knowledge management, data quality and CRM strategy.

Findings

The result shows that organizational factors have influence on e-CRM success. However, there are other factors needed to be more considered that are customer orientation having the most influence, following by knowledge management and technology. Still other factors have indirect effect on e-CRM success such as data quality and CRM strategy.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to examine an integrated model depicting the direct and indirect effects of organization factors on e-CRM success. From this perspective, this paper provides an improved understanding of how customer orientation and organizational factors, technology and knowledge management influences airlines applying e-CRM. This study also provides several implications for practice. The paper suggests airline providers and marketing managers, especially those in Vietnam, focus more on customer orientation activities. The paper also recommends that airlines should pay attention to its organizational structure in line with its customer-orientation strategy.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1933

Carl Wittmann

THE Deutsche Versuchsanstalt für Luft‐fahrt—known for short as the D.V.L.—at Berlin‐Adlershof, is the central establishment for aeronautical research in Germany. Hitherto…

Abstract

THE Deutsche Versuchsanstalt für Luft‐fahrt—known for short as the D.V.L.—at Berlin‐Adlershof, is the central establishment for aeronautical research in Germany. Hitherto the D.V.L. had as its special prerogative the testing of aircraft and aero‐engines for certificates of airworthiness. Since April 1, 1933, the Inspection Department has passed under the authority of the “Reichsamt für Flugsicherung” (Air Security Board), but it has not actually been separated from the D.V.L., continuing to have its premises at the D.V.L. establishment. (Further details of the Inspection Department are given later.)

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Michael W Hill

Despite their daunting reputation, patent documents, or copies of them, are in fact remarkably easy to acquire. Although some million patent specifications are published…

Abstract

Despite their daunting reputation, patent documents, or copies of them, are in fact remarkably easy to acquire. Although some million patent specifications are published each year for approximately half that number of new inventions, confusion is in general avoided because of the influence of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), which enables the 40 patent offices to work together in the cause of universal availability, to standardize their documents and to designate them uniquely. The somewhat complicated publication sequence and numbering systems of patents, both in the UK and overseas, are explained. There are many sources of supply for published patent specifications, both national and international, public and private sector, to meet varying needs, whether document or information‐centred. Amongst these are the patent offices (both national and international), regional sub‐offices, national technical libraries, depository centres and various private sector services. Finally, a reminder is given that the Science Reference and Information Service is itself a specialist both in the supply of patent documents and in information about them.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Rozenn Perrigot, Begoña López-Fernández, Guy Basset and Olivier Herrbach

As franchisees are independent entrepreneurs, one important part of the business format that franchisors are not allowed to impose on their franchisees is resale prices…

Abstract

Purpose

As franchisees are independent entrepreneurs, one important part of the business format that franchisors are not allowed to impose on their franchisees is resale prices. They are only allowed to indicate a recommended or a maximum price. This study aims to look further into the capabilities underlying the calculation of resale prices and suggests that price-setting is part of both the “business know-how” transferred to franchisees and the “organizational know-how,” that is, capabilities developed and kept at the franchisor level.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative methodology with a total of 65 interviews, 19 with franchisors and 46 with franchisees, all operating in the French market.

Findings

The findings show that resale pricing is a process that involves know-how. The complexity of pricing leads to develop specialized and broad capabilities. The first type of know-how, i.e., business know-how transferred to franchisees, deals with operational implementation of recommended resale prices in the stores. The second type, i.e., organizational know-how, not transferred as a safeguard against opportunism, connects across other functions of the franchise chain such as R&D and communication.

Originality/value

This study confirms the existence and relevance of another kind of know-how apart from the business know-how that is transferred to the franchisees. Organizational know-how at the chain level, though often neglected, is a necessary determinant of sustaining a competitive advantage. This know-how is not transferred to the franchisees but contributes to the success and sustainability of the franchisor/franchisee relationship. Franchisors should thus work on improving their capabilities to better support their franchisees. Moreover, this study highlight the complexity and extreme importance of setting the right resale price.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Rozenn Perrigot, Dildar Hussain and Josef Windsperger

The purpose of this paper is to explore independent small business owners’ perceptions of franchisees relationships with their franchisors, their fellow franchisees within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore independent small business owners’ perceptions of franchisees relationships with their franchisors, their fellow franchisees within the chain, their employees and their customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a qualitative approach and, more specifically, 26 in-depth interviews conducted with independent small business owners from various business sectors.

Findings

These independent small business owners perceive that franchisees have a dependency-based relationship with their franchisors; a competition-based relationship with their fellow franchisees; a rather complicated relationship with their employees; and a superficial relationship with their customers.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the franchising literature by presenting an outside-chain view of franchisees’ relationships with their franchisors, other franchisees, employees and customers.

Practical implications

The findings may have practical implications for franchisors, enabling them to better understand the concerns of independent small business owners as potential franchisee candidates.

Originality/value

The outside-chain view of franchisees’ relationships is innovative.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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