Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Alex Brayson

The experimental parliamentary subsidy on knights' fees and freehold incomes from lands and rents of 1431 was the only English direct lay tax of the Middle Ages which…

Abstract

The experimental parliamentary subsidy on knights' fees and freehold incomes from lands and rents of 1431 was the only English direct lay tax of the Middle Ages which broke down. As such, this subsidy has a clear historiographical significance, yet previous scholars have tended to overlook it on the grounds that parliament's annulment act of 1432 mandated the destruction of all fiscal administrative evidence. Many county assessments from 1431–1432 do, however, survive and are examined for the first time in this article as part of a detailed assessment of the fiscal and administrative context of the knights' fees and incomes tax. This impost constituted a royal response to excess expenditures associated with Henry VI's “Coronation Expedition” of 1429–1431, the scale of which marked a decisive break from the fiscal-military strategy of the 1420s. Widespread confusion regarding whether taxpayers ought to pay the feudal or the non-feudal component of the 1431 subsidy characterized its botched administration. Industrial scale under-assessment, moreover, emerged as a serious problem. Officials' attempts to provide a measure of fiscal compensation by unlawfully double-assessing many taxpayers served to increase administrative confusion and resulted in parliament's annulment act of 1432. This had serious consequences for the crown's finances, since the regime was saddled with budgetary and debt problems which would ultimately undermine the solvency of the Lancastrian state.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-880-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Paweł Ziółkowski and Janusz Badur

The purpose of this paper is the theoretical presentation of tensorial formulation with surface mobility forces and numerical verification of Reynolds thermal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is the theoretical presentation of tensorial formulation with surface mobility forces and numerical verification of Reynolds thermal transpiration law in a contemporary experiment with nanoflow.

Design/methodology/approach

The velocity profiles in a single microchannel are calculated by solving the momentum equations and using thermal transpiration force as the boundary conditions. The mass flow rate and pressure of unstationary thermal transpiration modeling of the benchmark experiment has been achieved by the implementation of the thermal transpiration mobility force closure for the thermal momentum accommodation coefficient.

Findings

An original and easy-to-implement method has been developed to numerically prove that at the final equilibrium, i.e. zero-flow state, there is a connection between the Poiseuille flow in the center of channel and counter thermal transpiration flow on the surface. The numerical implementation of the Reynolds model of thermal transpiration has been performed, and its usefulness for the description of the benchmark experiment has been verified.

Research limitations/implications

The simplified procedure requires the measurement or assumption of the helium-glass slip length.

Practical implications

The procedure can be very useful in the design of micro-electro-mechanical systems and nano-electro-mechanical systems, especially for accommodation pumping.

Originality/value

The paper discussed possible constitutive equations in the transpiration shell-like layer. The new approach can be helpful for modeling phenomena occurring at a fluid–solid phase interface at the micro- and nanoscales.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Nancy J. Mezey, Lori A. Post and Christopher D. Maxwell

This study examines the relationship between age, physical violence and non‐physical abuse within the context of intimate partner violence (IPV). It tests the hypothesis…

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between age, physical violence and non‐physical abuse within the context of intimate partner violence (IPV). It tests the hypothesis that while the prevalence of physical violence is lower among older women, other forms of intimate partner violence are not related to age. The study uses data from the Michigan Violence Against Women Survey to measure physical violence and two forms of non‐physical abuse: psychological vulnerability and autonomy‐limiting behavior. Findings support the hypothesis that the rate of physical abuse is negatively related to age but the rate of nonphysical abuse is not. By expanding the definition of IPV to include other forms of abusive behavior, the study finds that older women have IPV prevalence rates similar to younger women. This raises the question of whether batterers alter their means of power and control by emphasizing non‐physical abuse rather than continuing to use physical violence that exposes them to formal and informal social controls and sanctions.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Anja Gibson

Recently, the public and academic discussion on elite education and the selection of top performers in Germany has led to a renewed controversy about social exclusion and…

Abstract

Recently, the public and academic discussion on elite education and the selection of top performers in Germany has led to a renewed controversy about social exclusion and inequality. Consequently, the use of terms such as ‘elite’, ‘excellence’ and ‘intellectual giftedness’ have provoked a debate about the necessity, opportunities, and rejection of educational distinctions. This chapter takes a comparative perspective to examine a private boarding school with a rich tradition, and a relatively new state-run public boarding school, examining their status as exclusive educational institutions, including their selection processes, elite aspirations and educational philosophies. The analysis focusses on how the schools construe themselves as elite and how exclusive membership is created and negotiated within the boarding school context. Using a multilevel qualitative approach and empirical data, this chapter offers findings on mechanisms of elite formation in boarding schools between two poles: the reproduction of an existing elite status and the production of elites from scratch. The analyses show the establishment of a distinct composition of students – either selected by milieu affiliation or by cognitive abilities – resulting in specific processes of coherence and distinction within the school communities. Thus, this chapter makes a contribution to a differentiated observation of new educational hierarchies in Germany.

Details

Elites and People: Challenges to Democracy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-915-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Kayla Allison

Purpose – The overall purpose of this chapter is to discuss what is known about serious forms of bias violence, obstacles to studying bias violence, and how alternative…

Abstract

Purpose – The overall purpose of this chapter is to discuss what is known about serious forms of bias violence, obstacles to studying bias violence, and how alternative theoretical and methodological approaches can advance our understanding of bias violence in the twenty-first century.

Design/methodology/approach – Following a review of the literature, the applicability of identity fusion theory for explaining bias violence is considered and applied to the anti-racial mass shooting at an historically Black church in Charleston, South Carolina. Data come from an innovative open-source project known as the United States Extremist Crime Database.

Findings – Drawing from identity fusion theory, information from open-source data on the Charleston church shooting suggests that the perpetrator was a highly fused individual who perceived African Americans as a threat toward his social identity group and committed an act of extreme behavior (i.e., bias homicide) as a means for stabilizing his self-views.

Originality/value – This chapter builds upon prior studies of bias violence by demonstrating how (1) publicly available open sources (e.g., court documents and media reports) may be systematically compiled and used as reliable data for studying serious forms of bias violence, and (2) the use of social psychological theories, specifically identity fusion theory, can help to explain the role of personal and group identities in discriminatory violence.

Details

Homicide and Violent Crime
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-876-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

C.A. Maxwell‐Armstrong, M. Jonas, S. Hussein, J. Wright and J.H. Scholefield

Twenty‐four hour pH monitoring is an expensive, time‐consuming and uncomfortable investigation only necessary in a small proportion of patients with gastro‐oesophageal…

Abstract

Twenty‐four hour pH monitoring is an expensive, time‐consuming and uncomfortable investigation only necessary in a small proportion of patients with gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease. Guidelines have been published by the British Society of Gastroenterology, in order to clarify those patients likely to benefit. Aims to assess whether these guidelines are being followed in a large teaching hospital. A random selection of the notes of all patients referred for 24‐hour pH monitoring at the Queens Medical Centre were assessed for the appropriateness of referral. A total of 114 patients were referred for pH monitoring, and the notes of 77 of them reviewed. This audit shows that in the majority of cases guidelines are being followed. Referrals from non‐gastrointestinal specialties accounted for 50 per cent of cases where they were not. In addition, 40 per cent of all referrals from non‐gastrointestinal specialties failed to follow guidelines, suggesting that this group is either educated further as to their contents, or that all patients referred for 24‐hour pH monitoring see a medical or surgical gastroenterologist prior to the investigation.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2017

Vincent H. Smith and Joseph W. Glauber

In the United States, successive farm bills and the 2007 Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) have largely defined domestic subsidy and conservation programs and U.S. food-aid…

Abstract

In the United States, successive farm bills and the 2007 Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) have largely defined domestic subsidy and conservation programs and U.S. food-aid initiatives over the past decade. This chapter examines the effects of the current mixture of U.S. agricultural policies and international food-aid programs on domestic and global food-insecure populations. A detailed research-based examination is carried out with respect to the impacts of U.S. subsidy programs on agricultural production, domestic and global agricultural commodity prices, and their implications for food-insecure populations. The impacts of the RFS are assessed along with the effects of current and potentially reformed U.S. international food-aid programs.

This study concludes that current U.S. agricultural subsidy programs have small or negligible impacts on the aggregate level and mixture of U.S. agricultural output, U.S. domestic prices and global prices, and domestic and global food insecurity among poor households. The RFS has increased prices for food and feed grain and oilseeds with adverse implications for the urban poor in developing countries and some poor U.S. households. The portfolios of U.S. food-aid programs are managed inefficiently because of congressional mandates designed to aid special interest groups that waste 30% of the current budget. While U.S. subsidy programs likely should be moderated for other reasons, they have few impacts on domestic and globally food-insecure households. However, in relation to global and domestic food insecurity, the RFS should be discontinued and major reforms to U.S. international food aid implemented.

Details

World Agricultural Resources and Food Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-515-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2012

Abstract

Details

The Impact of HIV/AIDS on Education Worldwide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-233-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Edna Pasher, Otthein Herzog, Mor Harir, Yaara Turjeman-Levi and Wu Zhiqiang

Cities, like other ecosystems, are changing and evolving at a growing pace. Therefore, innovation has become a critical success factor in the creation of ‘smart cities’. A…

Abstract

Cities, like other ecosystems, are changing and evolving at a growing pace. Therefore, innovation has become a critical success factor in the creation of ‘smart cities’. A smart city is one that uses technology as a platform to serve its citizens’ needs and foster innovative processes that enhance their quality of life. In this chapter, the authors present two case studies of urban open innovation processes in, respectively, Haifa in Israel and Bremerhaven in Germany, which demonstrate the engagement of all stakeholders, motivated by passion, altruism and the desire to cooperate. The first case concerns open innovation with the young, and the second open innovation with the elderly. Both case studies demonstrate how passion led to altruism which encouraged citizens to volunteer to contribute and co-create a better future for all the city’s residents by enabling better communication among stakeholders in the context of a complex urban environment.

Details

Exploring the Culture of Open Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-789-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2015

Dragan Miljkovic

This chapter proposes a novel nonnormative approach to evaluating quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of food security.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter proposes a novel nonnormative approach to evaluating quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of food security.

Methodology/approach

On the demand side, we consider the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of the food security system, whose mechanisms should be evaluated by their impact on the quality of life of an endangered population. On the supply side, the motives of food aid donors and food security providers (directly and via policy mechanisms) are discussed in the context of the deservingness heuristic.

Findings

The model illustrates three problems with measuring food security-related quality of life: peoples’ different expectations, the different points at which people stand on their food security trajectory, and the potential for an evolving reference value of peoples’ expectations. The deservingness heuristic is the mechanism behind the domestic and international food security aid that occurs via evolutionary forces, or cultural, institutional, and ideological forces.

Social implications

Food security is a problem that requires a humanistic approach rooted in the evolutionary process/development of the human race. Food security can be misused by the food aid/welfare recipients for their own purposes. Likewise, food security programs by food aid/welfare donors can be targeted unethically when used to achieve the ideological, institutional, and political goals of the donors. Differentiating between the behavioral causes of providing food security may be helpful in predicting whether aid/welfare will be provided to the needy at all.

Details

Food Security in an Uncertain World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-213-9

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000