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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-616-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

MENGXIONG LIU

The use of bibliographic citation is a crucial aspect in the creation and dissemination of information. Numerous studies have been done ranging from simple citation counts…

Abstract

The use of bibliographic citation is a crucial aspect in the creation and dissemination of information. Numerous studies have been done ranging from simple citation counts to more complex bibliographic coupling studies, and from citation classifications to citation motivation studies. This review focusses on the citation studies that have explored the complexities and the underlying norms of the citation process. The major emphasis is placed upon the studies which have dealt with citation functions, citation quality, citation concepts and citation motivation. The international perspectives of citation practice are also discussed.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 1996

Robert A. Seal

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-879-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

Cynthia A. Kehoe

This paper reviews the history of separate online system interfaces, leading to efforts to develop expert systems for searching databases, particularly for end users, and…

Abstract

This paper reviews the history of separate online system interfaces, leading to efforts to develop expert systems for searching databases, particularly for end users, and introduces the research in such expert systems. Appended is a bibliography of sources on interfaces and expert systems for online retrieval.

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Online Review, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Book part
Publication date: 6 November 1992

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-616-8

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2006

Danuta A. Nitecki and Eileen G. Abels

The honor of editing the 30th volume of Advances in Librarianship posed a challenge of how to acknowledge changes in the profession over three and a half decades, while…

Abstract

The honor of editing the 30th volume of Advances in Librarianship posed a challenge of how to acknowledge changes in the profession over three and a half decades, while continuing a tradition of identifying new trends and innovations. The series aims to present a variety of aspects of the field of librarianship through the publication of critical articles and surveys, based on the published literature, research in progress, and current developments, relating to all segments of the profession and related topics. Contributing authors are encouraged to address provocative and stimulating topics that will ensure that trends are identified and research results of interest are made available quickly in a rapidly changing profession. Though authors in the past have been encouraged to add an historical perspective, those contributing to this volume were invited especially to celebrate the history of the past 36 years by reflecting, as appropriate, on advances made in their topic since the first volume of the series was published in 1970.

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-007-4

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

S.M. Zabed Ahmed, Cliff McKnight and Charles Oppenheim

The purpose of this article is to review the research on human‐computer interfaces for library‐based commercial online information retrieval (IR) systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to review the research on human‐computer interfaces for library‐based commercial online information retrieval (IR) systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The review first focuses on basic interface issues for information retrieval such as interface style, end‐user searching, query formulation, relevance feedback and browsing. The second part deals with cognitive engineering in IR including mental models and individual differences. Finally, the topics on user interface engineering are covered. These include user interface guidelines, usability evaluation methods and interface engineering techniques.

Findings

The review shows that user interface design has received a limited attention from IR researchers. There is a need for adopting human‐computer interaction (HCI) techniques into IR interface designs, but this issue has not yet been fully recognised by the commercial database vendors and distributors. The paper recommends that applying HCI techniques could help in developing more usable IR interfaces.

Practical implications

The review identifies the main activities of a user‐centred design methodology and suggests that IR interface designers should use this method in future. This could have major implications in IR interface design for end‐user searching.

Originality/value

The review is the first to offer an overview of empirical research on IR interface design and IR usability engineering. Both IR researchers and practitioners may benefit from the description of previous research and the user‐centred design advocated by the current research.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

Lutz Bornmann and Hans‐Dieter Daniel

The purpose of this paper is to present a narrative review of studies on the citing behavior of scientists, covering mainly research published in the last 15 years. Based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a narrative review of studies on the citing behavior of scientists, covering mainly research published in the last 15 years. Based on the results of these studies, the paper seeks to answer the question of the extent to which scientists are motivated to cite a publication not only to acknowledge intellectual and cognitive influences of scientific peers, but also for other, possibly non‐scientific, reasons.

Design/methodology/approach

The review covers research published from the early 1960s up to mid‐2005 (approximately 30 studies on citing behavior‐reporting results in about 40 publications).

Findings

The general tendency of the results of the empirical studies makes it clear that citing behavior is not motivated solely by the wish to acknowledge intellectual and cognitive influences of colleague scientists, since the individual studies reveal also other, in part non‐scientific, factors that play a part in the decision to cite. However, the results of the studies must also be deemed scarcely reliable: the studies vary widely in design, and their results can hardly be replicated. Many of the studies have methodological weaknesses. Furthermore, there is evidence that the different motivations of citers are “not so different or ‘randomly given’ to such an extent that the phenomenon of citation would lose its role as a reliable measure of impact”.

Originality/value

Given the increasing importance of evaluative bibliometrics in the world of scholarship, the question “What do citation counts measure?” is a particularly relevant and topical issue.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Simona Juvan, Tomaz Bartol and Bojana Boh

The article seeks to address a methodological procedure based on keyword analysis and the structuring of data into information systems in the field of functional foods, a…

Abstract

Purpose

The article seeks to address a methodological procedure based on keyword analysis and the structuring of data into information systems in the field of functional foods, a newly‐emerging scientific field within the broader scope of food sciences and technology.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was undertaken by selection of a research field or research subject, selection of search profile, selection and processing of relevant databases, keyword analysis, and the arrangement of data (keywords) according to tree‐structures. Keyword analysis was employed to identify narrower research fields within the broader scientific field. The structuring of data into systems was used to classify the terms within the particular narrow field. Keywords with higher and lower frequency were identified. A classification tree was set up, based on keywords (thesaurus‐based descriptors) extracted from the FSTA (Food Science and Technology Abstracts) database available online. The tree was supplemented and upgraded with some additional topical terms that have not as yet been included in the existing thesaurus. To serve as a comparison a completely new classification tree was designed, based on online full‐text data.

Findings

Comparison of the two trees suggests that the previous existing tree is sufficiently accurate in representing the field of functional foods, provided that it is upgraded with some additional terms. A more accurate classification should improve thesauri and consequently enhance retrieval in international databases.

Originality/value

Presents a methodology of database analysis which may serve to improve database patterns, especially with regard to information retrieval.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Abstract

In this chapter, I investigated how challenges (life events) are negotiated within families according to gender roles and their effect on marriage quality, life satisfaction, and psychological resilience in a nonclinical sample of heterosexual couples (N=159), age 23–78 (M=45.4, SD=11.2), with children (n=127) or childfree (n=32). Specifically, I accounted for the individual’s ability to share “hurt feelings” and foster intimacy within the couple, thus strengthening resilience and improving life satisfaction and hypothesized that the impact of negative life events on both relationship quality and life satisfaction could depend on the resilience levels of each partner and their ratio according to gender roles. Results confirmed the hypothesis and showed significant gender differences in the impact of negative life events on relationship quality, life satisfaction, ability to share hurt feelings, fear of intimacy, and resilience levels. Moreover, the ratio of the partner’s individual resilience affected the dependent variables differently by gender, its level interacted with the age of the couple’s first child (range: 2–54, mean: 21.4, SD: 10.4) and strongly depended on the occupation of the parents.

Details

Visions of the 21st Century Family: Transforming Structures and Identities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-028-4

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