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1 – 10 of 11
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

C. Cryss Brunner, W. Nick G. Hitchon and Rachel Brown

We discuss beneficial uses of imaging technologies in higher education that advance social justice. Misuse and ineffectiveness of shared decision making, specifically as related…

373

Abstract

We discuss beneficial uses of imaging technologies in higher education that advance social justice. Misuse and ineffectiveness of shared decision making, specifically as related to power relationships and the redistribution of decision‐making authority, are addressed through the development of technologically delivered experiential simulations (ES). We outline ways in which ES can change higher education preparation programs to meet and adapt to the challenges of the future. ES entails using computer technology to modify a person’s appearance and thereby evoking an atypical response from an audience. The key to our proposal, however, is having the person with the modified persona learn lessons pertinent to democratic cultures and social justice from their experience of immersion in that response.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Yong‐Lyun Kim and C. Cryss Brunner

The purpose of this study is to investigate differences and/or similarities between women's and men's career mobility toward the superintendency in terms of career pathways and…

1966

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate differences and/or similarities between women's and men's career mobility toward the superintendency in terms of career pathways and movement patterns, with specific attention to women's career pathways as they correspond with their aspiration to the superintendency.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study of upper level educational administrators in the USA, typical career pathways were identified for four targeted groups of the study: men superintendents; women superintendents; women central office administrators who aspire to the superintendency; and women central office administrators who do not aspire to the superintendency. Four pathways for each group were drawn by analyzing data related to survey respondents' professional experiences. In the analysis, descriptive methods including frequencies and percentages were used in drawing pathways.

Findings

One of the major findings from confirmed that career pathways for women in educational administration are different than those of men who typically become superintendents. While many men administrators had worked in line‐role positions and moved vertically up to the superintendency, women generally traveled to the superintendency through staff roles and their career mobility patterns were more often horizontal. In addition, significant differences were found between the career patterns of aspiring and non‐aspiring women central office administrators. The results of the study raise the question of whether particular career pathways actually create higher quality superintendents.

Originality/value

The study includes data from women central office administrators (aspiring and non‐aspiring), a large and recent data set that has been missing from most studies of career mobility. The inclusion of this data set allows one to identify: differences between women who do and who do not aspire; differences between seated women superintendents and aspiring and non‐aspiring central office administrators; and the potential added value that women bring to the role of superintendent of schools.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

C. Cryss Brunner

Despite widespread concern about the need to ensure that women succeed in superintendency positions, there is woefully little relevant literature. This paper presents the results…

1068

Abstract

Despite widespread concern about the need to ensure that women succeed in superintendency positions, there is woefully little relevant literature. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study of female superintendents focused on identifying their strategies for success. In broad strokes, the study draws on the insights of 12 women superintendents and 24 people who knew them. Interpretations are presented as they find expression in seven “strategies for success”.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2024

Marya Tabassum, Muhammad Mustafa Raziq, Matthew Allen, Naukhez Sarwar and Owais Anwar Golra

Leadership research has traditionally focused on formal leadership; however, leaders may emerge in informal settings in self-managed teams, and little is known about who emergent…

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership research has traditionally focused on formal leadership; however, leaders may emerge in informal settings in self-managed teams, and little is known about who emergent leaders are and what their characteristics are. This study investigates emergent leaders' behaviors, roles, skills, and leadership style, drawing on a multi-method approach.

Design/methodology/approach

We first identify emergent leaders using social network analysis and aggregation approaches. Second, we investigate emergent leaders' characteristics using interviews with forty agile team members in five organizations.

Findings

Results indicate different roles of emergent leaders (i.e. coach, liaisons), leadership styles (i.e. supportive), skills (i.e. culturally intelligent, strategist), and influencing factors (i.e. personality, technical knowledge, social circle).

Originality/value

We contribute by identifying emergent leaders through multiple identification methods (i.e. network analysis, aggregation), and then through identifying their various characteristics, we contribute to leadership literature as well as idiosyncrasy-credit theory. We also add to agile-leadership theory, showing that multiple informal leaders may emerge within agile teams. Finally, our findings have practical implications for self-managed teams, informal group settings, organizational change professionals, and organizations with horizontal structures.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Content available
102

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Janice Wallace and PhD

144

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2024

Marya Tabassum, Muhammad Mustafa Raziq and Naukhez Sarwar

Agile project teams are self-managing and self-organizing teams, and these two characteristics are pivotal attributes of emergent leadership. Emergent leadership is thus common in…

Abstract

Purpose

Agile project teams are self-managing and self-organizing teams, and these two characteristics are pivotal attributes of emergent leadership. Emergent leadership is thus common in agile teams – however, how these (informal) emergent leaders can be identified in teams remains far from understood. The purpose of this research is to uncover techniques that enable top management to identify emergent agile leaders.

Methodology/design

We approached six agile teams from four organizations. We employ social network analysis (SNA) and aggregation approaches to identify emergent agile leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

We approached six agile teams from four organizations. We employ SNA and aggregation approaches to identify emergent agile leaders.

Findings

Seven emergent leaders are identified using the SNA and aggregation approaches. The same leaders are also identified using the KeyPlayer algorithms. One emergent leader is identified from each of the five teams, for a total of five emergent leaders from the five teams. However, two emergent leaders are identified for the remaining sixth team.

Originality/value

Emergent leadership is a relatively new phenomenon where leaders emerge from within teams without having a formal leadership assigned role. A challenge remains as to how such leaders can be identified without any formal leadership status. We contribute by showing how network analysis and aggregation approaches are suitable for the identification of emergent leadership talent within teams. In addition, we help advance leadership research by describing the network behaviors of emergent leaders and offering a way forward to identify more than one emergent leader in a team. We also show some limitations of the approaches used and offer some useful insights.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Paul Matthews and Rob Stephens

This paper seeks to outline a social epistemological and ethical warrant for engaging in knowledge exchange on the social web, and to emphasise socio‐cognitive and emotional…

1700

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to outline a social epistemological and ethical warrant for engaging in knowledge exchange on the social web, and to emphasise socio‐cognitive and emotional factors behind motivation and credibility in communities supported by social software. An attempt is made to identify positive and negative patterns of interaction from this perspective and to argue for more positive intervention on the part of the information profession.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines social epistemological and related theory, cognitive and social drivers of behaviour and then draws together evidence to justify the definition of patterns that will be important to the project.

Research limitations/implications

A programme of evaluating online knowledge exchange behaviour using a social epistemological framework is needed. In order to do this, methodological development coupling formal epistemological with interpretive techniques for examining belief formation are also necessary.

Practical implications

Considerations for the design and deployment of knowledge platforms and for engagement with existing communities are outlined.

Social implications

The ideas presented attempt to define an important role for the information profession within a new paradigm of participation and social interaction online.

Originality/value

The connection between social epistemology theory and LIS has long been appreciated, but social epistemology is rarely applied to practice or to online social platforms and communities.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 62 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Edward P. San Nicolas

254

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

513

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

1 – 10 of 11