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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

CHOTCHAI CHAROENNGAM and EKNARIN SRIPRASERT

The most important function that facilitates construction organizations to accomplish profit maximization is cost control. However, the absence of a well‐established cost…

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1562

Abstract

The most important function that facilitates construction organizations to accomplish profit maximization is cost control. However, the absence of a well‐established cost control system has caused failures to many Thai contractors especially during the current economic recession period. To comprehensively understand cost control systems in practice, this study theoretically assessed effectiveness as well as the deficiencies of the ‘traditional’ systems vis‐à‐vis the ‘effective’ systems. In addition, by contrasting what are found in ‘effective’ systems but not found in ‘traditional’ systems, critical attributes most contributing to the systems' successfulness were identified so that the improvement steps can be suitably prioritized. The validated findings indicated remarkable contrasts between ‘traditional’ and ‘effective’ systems. Two critical aspects, including advancement of cost control framework and systematic participation of site personnel in cost control, were found to be the major differences. Interestingly, similar conditions were encountered in various countries such as Greece, Pakistan and Australia; hence suggestions from this study could be internationally useful.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2019

Boris David Idler and Konrad Spang

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relevant determinants of IT project decision making and their relevance in corporate practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relevant determinants of IT project decision making and their relevance in corporate practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The empiric analysis used in-depth expert interviews (n=18) as method for data collection and qualitative content analysis using evaluative categories for analysis.

Findings

Corporate practice is strongly influenced by descriptive decision making. There is only little use of normative decision models in decision making. In corporate practice little use is made of evaluations to analyze achieved project outputs and impacts to improve decision-making practice. This is the result of several evaluation barriers in organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is restricted to IT projects as the experts are responsible for IT project portfolio management. Also, an industry comparison is not included in the study.

Practical implications

The analysis shows that IT project decision making in corporate practice should include results from descriptive decision theory into project decision processes in corporate practice. More effort should be made in challenging project input data which is relevant for project decision making. By systematically including evaluations for relevant projects, the deviations between planned and achieved project impacts offer valuable feedback for estimators and decision makers.

Originality/value

The paper presents detailed analysis on decision variables and their relevance for IT project decision making in corporate practice. Critical aspects of decision making become clear, such as the aspects of evaluation barriers and the need to incorporate descriptive decision-making aspects into corporate decision processes.

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International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

C. Charoenngam, S.T. Coquinco and B.H.W. Hadikusumo

A change order is an order from an employer authorizing a variation. Success in managing change orders results in uninterrupted construction operations and an agreed final…

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1306

Abstract

A change order is an order from an employer authorizing a variation. Success in managing change orders results in uninterrupted construction operations and an agreed final project cost as well as duration. One of the methods to manage change orders is to establish good communication and cooperation among project team members. Success of this method can be enhanced by developing and utilizing a web‐based change order management system that supports documentation practice, communication and integration between different team members in the change order workflow. This paper discusses our web‐based project management system, change order management system (COMS), to manage change orders using the Internet. In order to show COMS’ potential benefits, a test case was conducted for comparing the COMS with the conventional practice of change order management.

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Construction Innovation, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Neema Kavishe, Ian Jefferson and Nicholas Chileshe

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to identify and rank the challenges influencing the delivery of the housing public-private partnership (HPPP) in Tanzania; and…

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1055

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to identify and rank the challenges influencing the delivery of the housing public-private partnership (HPPP) in Tanzania; and second, to suggest solutions in the form of a conceptual public-private partnership (PPP) framework model that will address the identified challenges and boost the chances of success.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a convergent parallel (concurrent) mixed method approach, data were collected from 28 stakeholders involved with HPPP projects in Tanzania using a hand-delivered and e-mail survey and 13 semi-structured interviews with public and private sector respondents. The quantitative data included subjecting the 19 challenges as identified from the literature to parametric tests such as one-sample t-tests and descriptive statistics tests such as measures of central tendencies and frequency analysis through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 22.0). Qualitative data employed content analysis. The research was further underpinned by a number of theoretical perspectives such as Gidden’s structuration theory, contingency theory, relational and equity theory.

Findings

The top five ranked challenges influencing the delivery of HPPP were “inadequate PPP skills and knowledge”; “poor contracting and tendering documents”; “inadequate project management”; “inadequate legal framework”; and “misinformation on financial capacity of private partners”. The least six ranked and most significant challenges based on the one-sample (single) t-tests were as follows: “Poor risk allocation”; “inexperienced private partner”; “unequal qualification and contributions of expertise”; “poor enabling environment to attract competent partners”; “inadequate mechanisms for recovery of private investors’ capital”; and “high costs in procuring PPP projects”. The qualitative study further confirmed the challenges and cited the reason for the failure of joint venture projects as the lack of motivation for undertaking similar PPP projects. Despite the increased awareness of PPP projects and associated marginal benefits, the main impediment to the uptake and delivery of PPP housing projects remained the lack of skills and expertise.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework model is not yet tested, but since this paper is part of the ongoing research, the next stage involves the testing and validation of the model. Future studies could test the applicability of the proposed framework in other HPPP projects in Tanzania, and in other similar developing countries. Second, the validated framework can contribute towards addressing similar challenges as well as providing guidance. The proposed framework model is not yet tested, but since this paper is part of the ongoing research, the next stage involves the testing and validation of the model. Furthermore, recommendation for future research is to test the alignment of the identified challenges to the proposed remedial solutions across the five phases within the proposed PPP framework with a number of case studies.

Practical implications

The identified challenges were used to form the basis of the framework presented in this paper. Furthermore, these provide useful information, thus leading to increased awareness to enable successful delivery of HPPP in Tanzania. Similarly, both the government and policy makers could use the findings as the basis for re-examining the existing PPP policy and regulations, and reflecting on the existing situation with a view to improving the delivery of future HPPP projects.

Originality/value

The empirical study is among the first that identifies and ranks the challenges of PPP for housing projects delivery within the Tanzanian context. The identification of the challenges enabled their ranking, resulting in the mapping out of the most critical challenges. Furthermore, using the Gidden’s structuration theory, the study illustrates how institution mechanisms (structures) address these delivery challenges, thus influencing the implementation of HPPP in Tanzania, and how individual stakeholders (human agents or agency) are able to make choices (advocated solutions) in dealing with the challenges. More so, these constraints (challenges) as identified and viewed through the contingency and equity theoretical lenses form the foundation for developing the PPP conceptual framework. The proposed framework would thus serve as a mechanism for providing practical solutions as well as reducing the level of severity of the identified challenges.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Neema Kavishe, Nicholas Chileshe and Ian Jefferson

The purpose of this paper is to identify and rank policy and regulatory framework factors and inherent pitfalls in the delivery of Tanzanian public–private partnerships…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and rank policy and regulatory framework factors and inherent pitfalls in the delivery of Tanzanian public–private partnerships (PPPs) affordable housing schemes. The strength of interactions between pitfalls is established, with practical solution proposals offered.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected from questionnaires administered to 28 Tanzanian stakeholders. Semi-structured interviews with public and private sector respondents then complemented survey findings with proposed solutions. The quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, mean scores, parametric tests and correlation analyses. Directed content analysis was used for the interview transcripts.

Findings

Results show that “current PPP policy and guidelines need further improvement” and “Tanzania has a PPP policy and clear regulatory framework” were rated higher as policy and regulatory factors. In contrast, “poor planning skills and analytical capacity”, “high cost of building materials” and “inadequate access to housing finance” were the critical pitfalls. Most practical solutions were broadly financial in nature, or related to training, project management or PPP-enabling environment.

Originality/value

The paper provides solutions that can be tailored to international practitioners interested in understanding the effects of PPP policy, regulatory issues and pitfalls on Sub-Saharan Africa and other similar developing economies.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Chau Ngoc Dang, Long Le-Hoai and Soo-Yong Kim

This study aims to identify key knowledge enabling factors (KEFs) which can enable construction companies to improve various organizational effectiveness outcomes (OEOs).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify key knowledge enabling factors (KEFs) which can enable construction companies to improve various organizational effectiveness outcomes (OEOs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a questionnaire, data are collected from construction companies in Vietnam. Mean score method is used to calculate the mean values of KEFs. In addition, regression analysis is used to identify KEFs which significantly affect OEOs.

Findings

A list of 32 KEFs, whose ranking orders of importance are provided according to different types of construction companies, is presented. In addition, different lists of specific KEFs which could significantly affect different OEOs are identified. Furthermore, seven key KEFs which could have a significant impact on many OEOs are highlighted.

Practical implications

The findings of this study could help construction companies to know the controllable KEFs, on which they should focus more. Hence, they could perform these KEFs properly to improve various aspects of organizational effectiveness.

Originality/value

This study identifies 32 KEFs and 10 OEOs specifically for knowledge management in construction companies. This study also provides construction companies with a better understanding of the impact of KEFs on various aspects of organizational effectiveness. Hence, they could develop effective KEFs-based management strategies to enhance various aspects of organizational effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Ahmadullah Hilali, Chotchai Charoenngam and Ankita Barman

For construction and management, the existing codes of practice of international organizations such as US Army Corps of Engineers, the Asian Development Bank, the World…

Abstract

Purpose

For construction and management, the existing codes of practice of international organizations such as US Army Corps of Engineers, the Asian Development Bank, the World Bank, the United Nations Office for Project Services, etc., often prove ineffective when applied in post-war countries like Afghanistan. Domestic contractors faced maximum challenges in contractual scope management, which was implemented by such organizations based on their existing codes of practice. The purpose of this paper is to understand these barriers in scope management as faced by the domestic contractors of Afghanistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a mixed methodology to cater to its objectives. Face-to-face structured interviews of 14 industry experts and extensive literature review were conducted to identify unique barriers pertaining to Afghanistan construction industry. Further, quantitative assessment of these barriers through the statistical tools of “mean score ranking,” “Kendall’s test” and “independent sample t-test” was carried out to understand the severity of the barriers.

Findings

In total, 39 unique barriers were identified under the groups of “scope formulation,” “scope completeness,” “scope pricing,” “scope implementation” and “scope change control.” The consequential impacts of these barriers and their existence at different stages of the project were illustrated. The most severe barriers were identified as the “inadequacy of site investigation reports” and the “unavailability of resources in local markets.”

Originality/value

The understanding of the challenges faced by local stakeholders, as highlighted by this study, can be utilized by these international organizations in their strategy and planning to ensure successful projects while also propagating the adoption of sustainable construction practices.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Chau Ngoc Dang and Long Le-Hoai

This study aims to relate knowledge creation factors (KCFs) to construction organizations’ effectiveness, which can be measured by different effectiveness outcomes (EOs).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to relate knowledge creation factors (KCFs) to construction organizations’ effectiveness, which can be measured by different effectiveness outcomes (EOs).

Design/methodology/approach

Data with regard to KCFs and EOs are collected from construction organizations in Vietnam using a survey questionnaire. Regression analysis is used to relate KCFs to EOs.

Findings

Various lists of specific KCFs that may significantly affect EOs are identified. Furthermore, several key KCFs that could play a vital role in enhancing different EOs are highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the use of data collected from construction organizations in Vietnam, the results of this study cannot be directly applied to other types of organization in other countries without using any other extra data.

Practical implications

Based on the results of relating KCFs to different EOs, construction organizations would know which specific KCFs are vital to their organizational effectiveness. Hence, they may enhance different organizational effectiveness aspects by focusing more on such KCFs.

Originality/value

In this study, 16 KCFs and 10 EOs which may be useful for organization-level knowledge management practices in construction are introduced. Furthermore, the specific controllable KCFs vital to different EOs are identified. Hence, construction organizations would establish KCFs-based strategies for their management activities to improve various organizational effectiveness aspects.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Wasan Teerajetgul and Chotchai Charoenngam

This research is aimed at examining the relationships between knowledge factors and the knowledge creation process in construction projects, paying particular attention to…

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1904

Abstract

Purpose

This research is aimed at examining the relationships between knowledge factors and the knowledge creation process in construction projects, paying particular attention to on‐site work.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of this research is cross‐sectional and uses a blended methodological approach of both quantitative and qualitative methods. The research model includes the following variables; six knowledge factors: vision of leadership, trust, collaboration, incentives, information technology (IT) support, and individual competencies; and four knowledge creation processes: socialization, externalization, combination, and internalization. Survey data from 70 construction projects in Thai construction firms, obtained by means of a questionnaire developed by the researcher, were collated and analyzed. As a means of testing the model, regression analysis techniques were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Consistent with previous empirical evidence, three knowledge factors affected the knowledge creation process: incentives, IT, and individual competencies. It was noted that these factors overlay the knowledge creation process at all execution stages of on‐site construction.

Originality/value

This research is expected to contribute to a better understanding of important knowledge factors and knowledge management research in Thai construction that is still at an infancy stage. In order to build a knowledge creative culture, construction project executives need to support and maximize the value of human assets (individual competencies). Furthermore, facilitating IT‐supported knowledge management in construction projects needs to be considered and emphasized needs to be placed on productive work and gain a competitive advantage.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Hassan Fazliani and Chotchai Charoenngam

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the factors affecting the claim negotiations in Iranian oil and gas construction projects. The findings of this paper give…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the factors affecting the claim negotiations in Iranian oil and gas construction projects. The findings of this paper give better understanding of claim negotiations in Iranian oil and gas projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology for this study involved the use of Delphi technique, conducted with non-Iranian stakeholders being involved in Iranian oil and gas construction projects more than five years and determined the major factors, affecting claims negotiations. Subsequently, factors’ weightings were derived using analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

Findings

In total, 13 affecting factors identified in three categories of: external, cultural and personal behavioral. Finally, the weights of factors were identified.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in the context of Iranian oil and gas projects. This industry has high standards and its employees are well chosen and have frequent in job training. All these affect the organization, working and people’s culture and behavior compared to other sectors of construction business. Therefore, the results of this research are specific to the oil and gas industry.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper can be considered as a practical guide for dealing with Iranian counterparts during claims negotiations to ensure amicable settlement. Also, it is useful for Iranian stakeholders to have better understanding of concerns of non-Iranian stakeholders.

Originality/value

The paper is the original work of the authors, and to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper has for the first time introduced the factors affecting claims negotiations. The findings of this paper provide useful insight into effective claims negotiations of Iranian oil and gas projects.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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