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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Melanie C. Brooks, Jeffrey S. Brooks, Agus Mutohar and Imam Taufiq

The purpose of this study was to investigate how socio-religious dynamics influence (and are influenced by) principals in Islamic schools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate how socio-religious dynamics influence (and are influenced by) principals in Islamic schools.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study took place in Semarang, Indonesia. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews with school leaders along with school site observations. To frame the study, we drew from both Indonesian and international scholarship to understand extant perspectives on the context and on the ways that principals influence socio-religious thinking and practices in schools.

Findings

Findings suggested that principals' personal experiences and beliefs are central to the ways that socio-religious thinking and practices are manifest in their school. Principals practice more progressive or conservative leadership by influencing the degree to which the school is (a) an open or closed system, (b) inclusive or exclusive in their practices and (c) plural or unitary in their teaching. In making decisions along each of these continua, principals in Islamic schools “curate” a socio-religious educational environment.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on principals and socio-religious dynamics in schools by discovering specific continua of practice that collectively suggest a more conservative or progressive interpretation of Islam. As this area is understudied in educational leadership, the study makes a foundational empirical contribution, suggests theoretical constructs heretofore unexplored, and advances the notion of principal as curator of educational practice.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 58 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Abstract

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Education, Immigration and Migration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-044-4

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Book part
Publication date: 15 March 2021

William J. Scarborough, Deborah Fessenden and Ray Sin

Research on gender attitudes has consistently found that younger generations have more gender egalitarian views than older generations. Less attention, however, has been…

Abstract

Research on gender attitudes has consistently found that younger generations have more gender egalitarian views than older generations. Less attention, however, has been directed toward examining whether the generation gap has grown or shrunk over time and whether it differs across dimensions of gender attitudes. Using data from the General Social Survey for years 1977–2018,the authors examine the generational gap in gender attitudes across three components: views toward women in leadership, working mothers, and the gendered division of family labor between public and private spheres. The results show that differences between generations vary significantly across these dimensions. Attitudes have converged over time in support for women’s leadership, yet Baby Boomers espouse slightly higher levels of support than other generations, including the younger Generation Xers and Millennials. In contrast, consistent generation gaps are observed in support for working mothers, where younger generations hold more supportive views than respective older generations. Attitudes toward the gendered division of public/private sphere labor have converged between Millennials, Generation Xers, and Baby Boomers, with only Pre-Baby Boomers holding significantly more traditional views. Collectively, these trends highlight how cultural change through cohort replacement does not uniformly advance gender egalitarian ideologies. Instead, these shifts vary across specific dimensions of gender attitudes.

Details

Gender and Generations: Continuity and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-033-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

CHRIS BROOKS and GITA PERSAND

It is widely accepted that equity return volatility increases more following negative shocks rather than positive shocks. However, much of value‐at‐risk (VaR) analysis…

Abstract

It is widely accepted that equity return volatility increases more following negative shocks rather than positive shocks. However, much of value‐at‐risk (VaR) analysis relies on the assumption that returns are normally distributed (a symmetric distribution). This article considers the effect of asymmetries on the evaluation and accuracy of VaR by comparing estimates based on various models.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Abstract

Details

Education, Immigration and Migration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-044-4

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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2007

David Shinar

Abstract

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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Jeffrey S. Brooks, Anthony H. Normore and Jane Wilkinson

The purpose of this paper is to explore theoretical connections between educational leadership for social justice and support for immigration. The authors seek to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore theoretical connections between educational leadership for social justice and support for immigration. The authors seek to identify strengths, weaknesses and opportunities for further study and improved practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a theoretical research paper that introduces, evaluates and expands two frameworks for understanding leadership and immigration.

Findings

Findings suggested that there is a need for educational leadership scholars to more purposefully investigate issues related to social justice and immigration.

Originality/value

This study offers a novel theoretical perspective on leadership, social justice and immigration.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

CHRIS BROOKS, ANDREW D. CLARE and GITA PERSAND

This article investigates the effect of modeling extreme events on the calculation of minimum capital risk requirements for three LIFFE futures contracts. The use of…

Abstract

This article investigates the effect of modeling extreme events on the calculation of minimum capital risk requirements for three LIFFE futures contracts. The use of internal models will be permitted under the European Community Capital Adequacy Directive II and will be widely adopted in the near future for determining capital adequacies. Close scrutiny of competing models is required to avoid a potentially costly misallocation of capital resources, to ensure the safety of the financial system. The authors propose a semi‐parametric approach, for which extreme risks are modeled using a generalized Pareto distribution, and smaller risks are characterized by the empirically observed distribution function. The primary finding of comparing the capital requirements based on this approach with those calculated from both the unconditional density and from a conditional density (a GARCH(1,1) model), is that for both in‐sample and out‐of‐sample tests, the extreme value approach yields superior results. This is attributable to the fact that the other two models do not explicitly model the tails of the return distribution.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2007

Simon C. Darnell and Robert Sparks

This paper critically examines the processes of meaning creation and transfer in sports celebrity endorsements. It uses findings from a qualitative case study that…

Abstract

This paper critically examines the processes of meaning creation and transfer in sports celebrity endorsements. It uses findings from a qualitative case study that investigated how Canadian journalists covered Simon Whitfield's gold medal win in the inaugural men's triathlon Sydney Olympic Games in 2000, and how sponsors subsequently capitalised on his media image. The results highlight key factors that influence Olympic sports reporting and their implications for leveraging an Olympic athlete's media image as part of a product endorsement strategy.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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