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Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article

C. Brooke Dobni and Mark Klassen

This article aims to highlight the results of a Global Innovation Survey from 407 organizations representing 33 countries. This was the third of three surveys conducted by…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to highlight the results of a Global Innovation Survey from 407 organizations representing 33 countries. This was the third of three surveys conducted by the researchers since 2011. Ten key insights were formulated to gauge the progress of innovation in organizations as well as the practice and success of nine innovation methods (data analytics, design thinking, innovation metrics, etc.) used to support innovation execution.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data was bifurcated into two groups, high and low innovators, by analyzing their innovation scores using a K-means cluster analysis. This was followed by correlational analysis with the innovation practices by these groups. Qualitative survey data was also collected and used to interpret the results.

Findings

Overall innovation scores have improved over the decade. Organizations are still struggling with process drivers such as idea management and innovation measures. High innovators are pervasively using innovative methods to advance innovation execution much more than low innovators. The two methods that showed the highest correlation to an innovative culture were design thinking and open innovation.

Originality/value

Comparing the Global Innovation Survey to two other surveys, 2011 Canadian Executives (n = 605) and 2013 US Fortune 1000 (n = 1,203) that use the same innovation measurement scale, provides a unique longitudinal perspective. The nine innovation methods investigated in the Global Innovation Survey provide original insight into how high and low innovative organizations are using methods to advance innovation execution.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article

C. Brooke Dobni, Mark Klassen and Drummond Sands

The purpose of this paper is to offer an opinion of current strategic thinking in North American organizations. By doing so, the paper presents a strategic model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer an opinion of current strategic thinking in North American organizations. By doing so, the paper presents a strategic model organizations can use that focuses on clarity.

Design/methodology/approach

The opinion and strategic framework was informed by authors’ research and consulting experiences over the past 10 years with leading companies across a variety of sectors.

Findings

Many organizations struggle with the strategic tradeoff between control, agility and risk and end up with complicated bureaucratic strategies. The strategic framework of clarity poses five questions that provides clear guidance for achieving focus.

Practical implications

Business leaders can apply the clarity framework to their existing strategic processes. By doing so, they can re-assess strategy and optimize their actions and outcomes to re-focus their strategic thinking in light of the new economy.

Originality/value

The paper offers a fresh perspective and opinion on strategy using familiar examples to executives. The clarity strategy framework provides executives with a simple but focused alternative to avoid strategic traps and learn from success and failure examples.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

C. Brooke Dobni, Mark Klassen and W. Thomas Nelson

The USA is the world’s largest economy, but is it a leading innovation nation? As economies mature and slow in growth, innovation will prove to be a key driver in…

Abstract

Purpose

The USA is the world’s largest economy, but is it a leading innovation nation? As economies mature and slow in growth, innovation will prove to be a key driver in maintaining transient advantage. This article presents a pulse on innovation in the USA as F1000 C-suite executives weigh in on their organization’s innovation health. It also compares the US score with proxy benchmark measures in other countries, and provides operational and strategic considerations to advance innovation platforms in US organizations. Managers will gain insight into common hurdles faced by some of America’s most prominent companies, as well as how to improve innovation practices in their own organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This current article reports on findings of innovation health in the USA based on responses from 1,127 F1000 executives (manager level and higher). F1000 executives report their innovation culture through completion of an innovation culture model survey developed by the authors. The F1000 is a listing created by Fortune magazine detailing the 1,000 largest companies in the USA based on revenues. This survey is considered one of the largest surveys on innovation culture in the USA to date.

Findings

One of the leading questions that this survey set out to answer is the current measure of innovation orientation amongst America’s largest organizations. Our findings suggest that US business is just beginning to catch the wave of innovation. Other major findings include: innovation amongst the F1000 is average at best; innovation is random and incremental; innovation strategy is missing in most organizations; there is an executive/employee innovation perception gap; innovation governance is missing; employees can not be blamed for a lack of innovation; and companies that fail to innovate will struggle even more.

Practical implications

There are a number of operational and strategic considerations presented to support the advancement of innovation in organizations. These include considerations around the leadership, resources, knowledge management and execution to strategically support innovation.

Originality/value

This is an original contribution in that it uses a scientifically developed model to measure innovation culture. It is the largest survey of innovation to date amongst the US Fortune 1000, and the finding present considerations to advance the innovation agendas of organizations.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article

C. Brooke Dobni

Academic and practitioner interest has focused on innovation as a method of competitive differentiation and as a way to create customer value. However, less attention has…

Abstract

Purpose

Academic and practitioner interest has focused on innovation as a method of competitive differentiation and as a way to create customer value. However, less attention has been devoted to developing a measure of innovation culture. The purpose of this paper is to develop an empirically‐based comprehensive instrument for measuring an organization's innovation culture.

Design/methodology

This paper describes a procedure which explicates the innovation culture construct, and proposes a multi‐item measure of innovation culture predicated on exploratory factor analysis. These descriptors were derived from extant literature, key informant interviews, and a survey of over 282 employees from the financial services industry.

Findings

Findings suggest that an innovation culture scale may best be represented through a structure that consists of seven factors identified as innovation propensity, organizational constituency, organizational learning, creativity and empowerment, market orientation, value orientation, and implementation context.

Practical implications

The seven‐factor model can be used both descriptively and diagnostically. Among other things, it presents a practical way to measure an organization's innovation culture, and could initially be used to establish a baseline level of innovation culture. From there, it could be used as a metric to chart the organization's efforts as it moves to engender innovation.

Originality/value

More effort should be devoted to developing measures to assess innovation culture specifically. This model presents an innovation culture construct that is complimentary to work that has preceded it. The findings combined with the suggestions provide an alternative perspective as a measure of innovation and extends a basic framework for further investigation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article

C. Brooke Dobni

A survey by Gary Hamel's company (Strategos) identified that over 80 percent of senior managers agreed that innovation creates a strong source of competitive advantage

Abstract

Purpose

A survey by Gary Hamel's company (Strategos) identified that over 80 percent of senior managers agreed that innovation creates a strong source of competitive advantage, and 90 percent indicated that innovation is highly valued. Yet these same companies rated themselves poorly at innovation. This paper sets out to consider behaviors and traits that will help organizations to successfully innovate.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent articles have attempted to use the concept of scientific DNA as a metaphor to describe characteristics of an organization. Many of these are descriptive and refer to basic core activities that managers need to concern themselves with. This article presents an analogy of DNA for the business perspective. There are certain behaviors and traits – call them innovation genes – that are foundational to innovation. It is believed that the sequence presented is this paper represents the basic building blocks for organizational innovation.

Findings

The paper finds that the innovation DNA sequence includes employee centric traits of knowledge management, cluster management, value management, and alignment. The context shaping innovation includes employee constituency and empowerment. The outcomes include strategic architecture to support innovation, innovation mapping of strategic initiatives, and value creation. There are competitive and positioning advantages of innovation DNA that promote a sustainable competitive advantage.

Originality/value

Embedding innovation DNA into the organization's fabric elevates organizations to being innovative in everything they do ‐ from knowledge management to value creation, and execution. Its application is universal as it elevates the least common denominator respecting how employees think and act; behaviors which lend life to innovation. As a result, the innovation imperative will only be as good as the organization's lowest common denominator in this respect.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article

C. Brooke Dobni and George Luffman

Organizational performance is greatly influenced by employee behaviours and the resulting market orientation that they possess. Market orientation is a behavioural culture…

Abstract

Organizational performance is greatly influenced by employee behaviours and the resulting market orientation that they possess. Market orientation is a behavioural culture that affects strategy formulation and strategy implementation, and how an organization interacts with its environment and adjusts to changes within that context. The relationship between market orientation and performance is robust across several environmental contexts that are characterized by varying degrees of market turbulence, competitive intensity, and products/services introduction rates. This study identifies co‐aligned market orientation and strategy profiles corresponding to unique competitive contexts that represent best practices for an organization seeking to maximize performance in a high technology environment. This relationship becomes dynamic when one considers the assertion that organization culture is synonymous with strategy and the evidence that the external environment affects organizational culture. As a result, the ability to profile ideal orientations will have significant strategic and performance implications for organizations that will contribute to the development of a sustainable competitive advantage.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

An organization that boasts effective strategies is best positioned to optimize its performance. Putting such strategies in place is only the start though. Companies must also regularly evaluate their impact and ensure that they remain relatively uncomplicated. However, many operators fail in these respects while others become complacent. Author and inspirational speaker Steve Maraboli once argued that “a lack of clarity could put the brakes on any journey to success”. Such sentiments have become increasingly relevant in the current business environment where change seems the only certainty. As industries splinter and competition intensifies further, clearly defined strategies are undoubtedly more critical still.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the worlds leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article

Sana El Harbi, Alistair R. Anderson and Meriam Amamou

– The research aims to ask whether, in the absence of overarching innovative conditions, a small firm can have an innovative culture and what its scale and scope is.

Abstract

Purpose

The research aims to ask whether, in the absence of overarching innovative conditions, a small firm can have an innovative culture and what its scale and scope is.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs four exploratory case studies. This methodological choice is justified in that a case study approach allows the use of the existing literature without inhibiting the detection of any unique characteristics in the Tunisian context. This context of a developing economy is likely to be different from established economies.

Findings

The study finds evidence of a learning environment within the firms and a good fit with the concepts of an innovative culture. Internal knowledge sharing is evident for all companies. However, this culture faces inwards, so that the paucity of linkages and weak socialisation combines with institutional thinness to isolate the firms. Local competitive advantages are not amplified but rather are dampened by the relative absence of interaction.

Research limitations/implications

Most research about innovation in the ICT sector is conducted in the context of developed countries. This paper shows the specificities and uniqueness of innovation culture in the context of a developing country.

Practical implications

The findings imply that despite recent improvements, Tunisia lacks many of the regional “institutions” that produce the synergic benefits of an innovative milieu.

Originality/value

The context of a developing country is novel. The value of the findings may, however, be extended to other similar countries. This is important given the role of ICT in “catching up”.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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