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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Shahnaz Nayebzadeh and Maryam Jalaly

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the nature of emotion, self-esteem and life satisfaction tendencies amongst Iranian Muslim consumers when making impulse purchases.

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1420

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the nature of emotion, self-esteem and life satisfaction tendencies amongst Iranian Muslim consumers when making impulse purchases.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed amongst female Muslim participants at a shopping centre in Yazd, Iran – each of which were selected using cluster and random sampling methods. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and structural equation modelling techniques, where LISREL software was used to measure the direct and indirect relationships between variables.

Findings

Within the sample, there was a direct causal relationship between impulse buying tendencies, impulse buying behaviour and purchasing. Second, there was a negative relationship between self-esteem and life-satisfaction within impulse buying tendencies. Finally, a positive relationship exists between emotion and impulse buying tendencies, which elicits impulse buying behaviour culminating in purchases. Emotion drives these consumers towards dissonance-reducing behaviour, which mediates low self-esteem and life satisfaction – through consumerism as a form of retail therapy. Some of the items purchased on impulse, that fulfilled this role, were hijabs (headscarves) and mantos (a type of tunic/shirt-dress/coat common in Iran).

Research limitations/implications

The hijab is worn by Muslim females across the globe. However, the manto is an item of clothing worn almost exclusively by Iranian females. Therefore, it is likely that Muslim females in different geographies may exhibit similar behavioural traits, but their consumption patterns would substitute this item with a different one, such as an abaya or jilbab, for example.

Originality/value

Whilst the notion of retail therapy is widely understood, the novel contribution of this study lies in highlighting that the purchase of clothing such as hijabs and mantos by Iranian Muslim females is not just driven by rational and emotional decision-making seeking to fulfil religious obligations. There are cases where these religious artefacts are used to raise feelings of self-esteem and life satisfaction within the same individuals.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Mohammad Mominul Islam

This study aims to reveal how consumers and shoppers are negative toward alcohol, animal fat, producers and certification issues concerned with halal cosmetics products.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reveal how consumers and shoppers are negative toward alcohol, animal fat, producers and certification issues concerned with halal cosmetics products.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 527 students of 4 public universities and a medical college across Bangladesh took part in a survey and 150 shoppers from 2 cities participated in the face to face interview with the structured questionnaires. Frequency distribution was used for categorical and numerical data, and the chi-square test with a binary logistic regression model has tested the association between gender and attitudes toward halal cosmetics. Besides, narratives of Sharīʿah regarding alcohol, meat, fat and halal certification have helped understand the halal issue.

Findings

In total, 83% of the respondents perceived negative attitudes against haram animal fat followed by alcohol (74%) and animal fat (64%). The chi-square test shows that consumers held a significant association toward haram animal fat, (p-value 0.000) alcohol, (p-value 0.000) non-Muslim producers (p-value 0.000) and non-Muslim countries (p-value 0.026). Imperatively, the binary logistic regression model has found a significant negative association to haram animal fat (ß2 −0.295) and alcohol (ß1 −0.200).

Practical implications

Marketers ought to avoid haram animal fat in halal cosmetics besides focusing on alcohol freeness. Also, non-Muslim marketers need to be extra cautious in showcasing their identities. However, Islamic marketers will enjoy a competitive advantage in the halal market because of their demographic factors.

Social implications

Islamic principles on alcohol, meat, fat and certification potentially can help other stakeholders sense the halal norms.

Originality/value

This study has blended the elements of Sharīʿah with empirical evidence to shed light on the fundamental and trust factors for the marketing of halal cosmetics products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Shaizatulaqma Kamalul Ariffin, Ishak Ismail and Khairul Anuar Mohammad Shah

This paper aims to view the role of religiosity in moderating the relationship between ego-defensive function of Muslim consumers’ and attitude toward advertising of…

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1346

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to view the role of religiosity in moderating the relationship between ego-defensive function of Muslim consumers’ and attitude toward advertising of controversial product. There is a rising concern among Muslim consumers’ with regards to the halal status of many food outlets in Malaysia. This came out because many food operators do not understand what halal really means. Many of them are from Kopitiams food and beverages industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey method was used for the purpose of data collection in April 2014, and quantitative approach has been used as well. This study applied functional theory of attitudes to support this framework. Respondents consisted of 375 Muslim consumers’ in Malaysia.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about how religiosity moderates the relationship between ego-defensive function and consumer attitude toward advertising. Consumers with a high level of religiosity are more likely to respond less favorably toward the advertising, while consumers who have a low level of religiosity are more likely to respond more favorably toward the advertisement. In addition, it can be postulated that religiosity reduces negative effects of ego-defensive function.

Practical implications

The fact that religious groups are more organized, equipped and motivated to register their concern, demands better understanding of such groups by marketers. To avoid any controversies, or potential business loss, a better understanding of what could ignite their reaction seems to be an appropriate preventive strategy.

Originality/value

Only a few studies directly examined the influence of religion on marketing communication. The effects of religion on the advertising of controversial products remain largely unstudied to date. Therefore, this paper fills the gap in the research area.

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

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524

Abstract

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Adem Uysal and Abdullah Okumuş

The purpose of this study is to identify the impact of ethical judgements, depending on religiosity level of consumers, on decisions of buying or not buying products from

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the impact of ethical judgements, depending on religiosity level of consumers, on decisions of buying or not buying products from supermarkets selling alcoholic beverages.

Design/methodology/approach

The scope of this study covers consumers from province of Mus in Turkey who indicate they go shopping at supermarkets. Accordingly, data are collected from 362 consumers via face-to-face survey and the results are evaluated through regression analysis.

Findings

According to analysis, it was found that the internal and external religiosity of the consumers positively affected their ethical judgement towards the markets selling alcoholic beverages. Besides, it is concluded that the ethical judgements of consumers have a positive impact on boycott decisions against supermarkets selling alcoholic beverages.

Originality/value

The survey contributes to relevant literature by putting forth the impact of ethical judgements of consumers, associated with their level of religiosity, on their decisions as to preference of supermarkets. Moreover, this study is consistent with the previous studies and supports the conclusion that the ethical decisions are affected by the extrinsic and intrinsic levels of religiosity; however, they are more affected by the intrinsic levels of religiosity.

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Fawzi Dekhil, Hajer Jridi and Hana Farhat

This research aims to analyze the effects of religiosity on the decision to participate in a boycott and the effect of a boycott on attitudes toward the boycotted brand…

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1181

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to analyze the effects of religiosity on the decision to participate in a boycott and the effect of a boycott on attitudes toward the boycotted brand. It also aims to measure the moderating effect of brand loyalty on the different models the authors discuss.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment involving 165 Tunisian individuals during a call for a boycott of products of the Coca-Cola Company, which supports the Israeli army against Palestine, was conducted. Data analyses were conducted via two principal stages using SPSS 20.0 and Smart PLS 2.0.

Findings

The findings show that degree of religiosity was one of the antecedents of decision to participate in a boycott, and this decision has a negative effect on the attitude toward the brand being boycotted. The paper also has been able to show that brand loyalty moderates the relation of the present model. It diminishes the effect of religiosity on boycotting.

Research limitations/implications

Among the limits of the study is the fact that the authors relied on the investigation of only one product/brand (namely, Coca-Cola). In addition, the samples subjected to inquiry by the authors were chosen for their convenience.

Practical implications

Besides, the presentation of boycotted products in stores has a negative effect on the sales of the surrounding “non-boycotted” products (Friedman, 1999a). The authors note here that marketers can derive huge benefits from the exploration of boycott, for many reasons. The company must insist on the satisfaction and trust of their consumers, which are the bases of the loyalty. They must define the marketing strategy to increase the loyalty. This will diminish the effect of religiosity on the decision to participate in the boycott.

Social implications

The results allow us to assert that the decision to participate in a boycott has a negative effect on the attitude of the consumer and on the brand to be boycotted. Investigating the moderating effect of loyalty on the relation between religiosity and the decision to participate in a boycott is very interesting.

Originality/value

This research has shown that religiosity has a positive effect on boycotting. Also, it was found that a boycott has a negative effect on attitudes toward the boycotted brand. Therefore, brand loyalty moderates negatively the effect of religiosity on the decision to participate in the boycott and moderates the effect of the boycott on brand attitude.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Asmat-Nizam Abdul-Talib and Mohd Muttaqin Mohd Adnan

The purpose of this study is to examine the willingness to boycott among Malaysian consumers towards the surrogate products associated with Israel. The present study was…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the willingness to boycott among Malaysian consumers towards the surrogate products associated with Israel. The present study was based on the previous and an ongoing war and conflict in the Middle East.

Design/methodology/approach

Several surrogate products associated with Israel were selected. A total of 468 respondents from various backgrounds participated in this study. Analysis was performed using multiple regression analysis (MRA).

Findings

Results showed that three factors were significant in predicting the willingness to boycott. They were animosity, subjective norms and product judgments. Anticipated emotions (both positive and negative emotions) were found to be insignificant in predicting the willingness to boycott the surrogate products.

Originality/value

The present study addresses the boycott intention in Malaysia where multi-races and multi-religions exist, in the context of the ongoing war and oppression by Israeli government toward the Palestinians. The results have some implications to multinational firms, especially those perceived to have direct links with the aggressors.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Michael Shaw

Sydney road in Melbourne is a multicultural experiment where Hipster youth culture contests the street space with a variety of immigrants from the Middle East and Indian…

Abstract

Purpose

Sydney road in Melbourne is a multicultural experiment where Hipster youth culture contests the street space with a variety of immigrants from the Middle East and Indian subcontinent who consumer Halal food. This paper explores the relationship between these through an examination of their respective cuisines and negative online restaurant reviews. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of conflict as it expresses itself in this way and to consider the wider political context in passing.

Design/methodology/approach

Google online restaurant reviews for all food outlets in the area were tabulated and then the percentage of negative reviews was calculated. Restaurants were split into categories by area and by ethnicity. The results were then discussed with reference to other research in this area.

Findings

Hipster, Middle Eastern Halal and pubs enjoyed the lowest levels of negative online reviews. Indian, Pakistani and chain restaurants had the highest levels of negative online reviews. This could be due to many undetermined causes.

Research limitations/implications

More powerful analytical tools were not used. Also, the text of the reviews was not examined or discussed.

Practical implications

Restaurants who attract larger percentages of negative reviews should try to improve their service offerings. This can be achieved by the standardisation of market offering.

Social implications

The local municipality, which is Moreland council should consider focussing on promoting and expanding this precinct and encouraging the emergence of several zones so that Islamic tourism and way of life can be facilitated.

Originality/value

This is a simple and interesting approach, which encapsulates the paradoxes and dynamics of the Australian attitude to multiculturalism by focusing on a single aspect of customer response in a consumption setting. As such it is an antidote to excessive theorising and empiricism. Readers will enjoy this study and may use the approach to guide their own choice of dining venues.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Phattharatharaporn Singkheeprapha, Zulfiqar Ali Jumani and Sasiwemon Sukhabot

In southeast Asia, international companies are growing to serve customers with multiple faiths. This study aims to focus on Thailand and it is one of Southeast Asia’s…

Abstract

Purpose

In southeast Asia, international companies are growing to serve customers with multiple faiths. This study aims to focus on Thailand and it is one of Southeast Asia’s nations and it has Muslim minority customers. To represent Thai Muslim companies, Thai Muslims are marketing their goods by bearing the tagline “we are Islamic”. Scholars described it as “Islamic brands”. This research describes the significant feature of Islamic brands between Thai Muslim people. It examines, which of the Islamic brand dimensions motivates Thai customers towards buying Islamic brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study’s conceptual model was the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and 281 Thai Muslims responded via a standardised survey. The data was collected from four southern Thailand provinces (Narathiwat, Pattani, Satun and Yala) and the statistical application Smart-partial least-squares 3 was used for data analysis.

Findings

The most significant factor motivating Thai Muslims towards purchasing Islamic brands is the customer’s Islamic brand. The second factor was the Islamic brands by compliance and Islamic brands by country of origin.

Research limitations/implications

Three regions in Thailand have been researched, as well as the results concentrate only on three Islamic brand attitudes as independent variables and the development of behavioural expectations of TPB. This research also presents a model that could help understand the consumer perceptions about Islamic brands and established brands amongst various consumers.

Practical implications

The present research applies to small companies and multi-national businesses, as it illuminates and recognises the image of Islamic brands and suggests the preferences of customers in selecting the brand of Islamic brand.

Originality/value

The current study aims to explain Thai Muslim customers’ buying behavioural intentions while purchasing Islamic brands in Thailand.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2020

Zulfiqar Ali Jumani and Sasiwemon Sukhabot

Multi-national corporations (MNC) are investing in Malaysia to serve Malay Muslims by carrying the tag line “we are Islamic” for their products. Academicians defined it…

Abstract

Purpose

Multi-national corporations (MNC) are investing in Malaysia to serve Malay Muslims by carrying the tag line “we are Islamic” for their products. Academicians defined it, as “Islamic brand/s”. Islamic brand/s further divided into three subcategories, namely, Islamic brand/s by compliance, Islamic brand/s by the customer and Islamic brand/s by country of origin. This study aims to identify the important aspect of the Islamic brand/s among the Malaysian Muslims, and it identifies, which Islamic brand aspect motivate Malay consumers to buy Islamic brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model takes on in the current study was the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). The data was collected from three states of Malaysia (Penang, Kuala Lumpur and Johor Baharu) from 236 Malaysian Muslims through a structured survey instrument. Smart-partial least squares 3 statistical software was used for analyses.

Findings

Among Malaysian Muslims, the most important attitude is the Islamic brand/s by origin (country of origin) followed by the Islamic brand/s by the customer and Islamic brand/s by compliance.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in three states of Malaysia, and the results are based on three attitudes of Islamic brands as independent variables and buying behavioural intentions (BI) construct of TPB.

Practical implications

Current study valuable for local businesses, MNCs, other Islamic and halal institutes. This study put light and give awareness of the positioning of the Islamic brand/s. Plus the intentions of users in selecting Islamic brand/s.

Originality/value

This research pursues to clarify consumers’ buying BIs in buying Islamic brand/s in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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